Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

During 2011, a record 800,000 people took the GRE, an increase of 13 percent, the Educational Testing Service announced today. ETS officials noted that this increase came in the year that the test featured numerous redesigned features. While not all GRE test-takers end up applying to graduate programs, increases in volume on the test are usually reflected in subsequent applications to graduate schools. If these figures do predict subsequent trends, look for major increases from outside the United States. The increase in the United States was 10 percent, while test-taking in other countries was up by nearly 25 percent. The two largest providers of foreign students to the United States both saw substantial gains, with the numbers from China up 28 percent, and the figures from India up 43 percent.

 

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 - 3:00am

A majority of more than 800 bankruptcy lawyers in a survey say they have seen an increase in clients with student loans over the past few years and that most of those debtors are unlikely to be able to discharge their loans due to "undue hardship." The survey, published by the National Association of Consumer Bankruptcy Attorneys, found that 62 percent of the lawyers have seen bankruptcy cases involving student loans increase at least 25 percent since 2008. A paper published with the survey warns of a "Student Loan ‘Debt Bomb,' " and calls for restoring the ability to discharge student loans in bankruptcy.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Monday was the 101st anniversary of Ronald Reagan's birth -- and Young America's Foundation marked the occasion with release of a national poll suggesting that professors have yet to give the Gipper his rightful place in history. "Americans rate Ronald Reagan as the greatest president, but try telling that to professors on our nation’s campuses. In a recent survey, 60 percent of college professors did not even rank President Reagan among the top ten presidents," said a press release on the poll results. Further, not one of the 284 faculty members surveyed named Reagan as the top president. (President Lincoln had the most support for that spot.) At the same time, the foundation noted that 61 percent of professors said Reagan had been successful, a level of praise that the foundation said was significant give that "the leftist tilt of college professors is well known."

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00am

A student at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside has confessed to writing the racial threats (including a hit list of students) that terrified the campus last week, TMJ4 News reported. The student had discovered a grouping of rubber bands that she took to be a noose and reported that discovery. The student told authorities that she was not satisfied with the investigation of the reported noose, so she made the threatening notes. Those notes prompted heightened security and several meetings on the campus.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 4:21am

The National Endowment for the Humanities on Monday named Wendell Berry -- a poet, novelist and essayist with a focus on conservation issues -- as the 2012 Jefferson Lecturer. Berry will deliver the lecture on April 23 in Washington. The lecture, "It All Turns on Affection," will discuss human interaction with nature, as depicted in history, philosophy, and literature.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00am
  • Paul M. Bobrowski, associate professor and former dean of the College of Business at Auburn University, in Alabama, has been named dean of the School of Business Administration at the University of Dayton, in Ohio.
  • Jack Cline, assistant vice president for federal relations at the University of Massachusetts System, has been chosen as director of federal relations at the University of Kansas.
  • Thomas W. Durso, senior director of marketing and communications at Holy Family University, in Pennsylvania, has been appointed as associate vice president for college relations and marketing at Albright College, also in Pennsylvania.
  • Tracie MacMahon, vice president for marketing and client relations at the National Student Clearinghouse, in Virginia, has been promoted to chief operating officer there.
  • Chip Paucek, president and chief operating officer at 2tor Inc., in New York, has been named chief executive officer there.
  • Robert J. Pietrykowski, assistant vice president for human resources and chief negotiator at Cleveland State University, in Ohio, has been selected as vice president of human resources at Nova Southeastern University, in Florida.

The appointments above are drawn from Inside Higher Ed's job changes database. To submit news about job changes and promotions, please click here.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Elizabeth Gershoff of the University of Texas at Austin examines long-term outcomes among children subjected to spanking. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 4:23am

Nearly half of the for-profit colleges in California are being kicked out of a state student aid program because of their default rates, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Under a California law, those with three-year loan default rates of 24.6 percent or higher are barred from having their students receive Cal Grants. About 4,900 Cal Grant recipients were enrolled at this colleges when the law took effect in the fall. Those who had been previously enrolled were allowed a partial grant.

 

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 4:28am

Every bowl season features pundits debating a playoff for big-time college football. But a more serious challenge may be emerging from the Big Ten. The Chicago Tribune reported that Big Ten officials are talking about a plan in which the top four football teams would be removed from the Bowl Championship Series, and would instead have a playoff. The semifinal games would be played at the higher seeded institution of the two pairs. The site of the championship would be bid out. The Big Ten idea emerges amid concern among many in college football about low ratings for this year's championship game and a noted lack of excitement among fans about many bowl games.

 

 

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 3:00am

Protests against Sallie Mae's $50 "forbearance fees," which the lender charges to borrowers who cannot pay their loans and opt to let the funds accumulate interest, unpaid, rather than defaulting, have spread to Facebook. Thursday, Sallie Mae changed its policy after a petition to end the fees gained more than 75,000 signatures: after the borrowers have begun repaying the loan, the $50 fee will be applied against the loan's balance rather than pocketed by the company.

But that wasn't enough for many who wanted to see the fees vanish entirely, and many commented on the Facebook page for Sallie Mae's Upromise accounts asking that the policy be changed. The company later removed the Facebook posts, according to before and after screenshots. The "before" screenshot was provided by Change.org, the website where the petition started. (By Monday evening, more comments had appeared. Sallie Mae representatives did not respond to a request for comment from Inside Higher Ed.)

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top