Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, June 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Instructure, the learning management provider, today announced a deal with the Cisco Networking Academy, an educational program of Cisco Systems that partners with universities, community colleges and high schools to prepare students for the company’s certification exams. Under the deal, Cisco Networking Academy would use Canvas, Instructure’s open-source learning management system, to deliver its I.T. courses to about 1 million students worldwide, according to a press release. It is a coup for the young company, which captured a modest 1.2 percent share of the LMS market last fall.

Friday, June 15, 2012 - 4:19am

A feature in The Los Angeles Times explores the role of the humanities and social sciences at the California Institute of Technology, which this year will see only one person graduate with a major in the humanities and social sciences who does not also have a major in the sciences. While it is rare to major in the humanities, many humanities courses are popular and Caltech requires students to take the equivalent of a humanities or social sciences course each semester. Warren Brown, who teaches medieval history, said: "These kids are going to become scientists, engineers and mathematicians, and they are going to move out into a world that often doesn't understand what they do, doesn't understand why it is important or tries to manipulate what they do for financial or political reasons.... These kids have to know they are moving out into a human society and have to understand how human society works."

Friday, June 15, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeffrey Marlett of the College of Saint Rose examines how ethnic Catholics have embraced the American spirit of competition. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Statements and rumors of all kinds are flying over the decision of the University of Virginia board to oust Teresa Sullivan as president. The decision, announced Sunday, stunned faculty leaders and many others who thought Sullivan was off to a strong start in her nearly two years in office:

  • The Council of Chairs and Directors released a letter blasting the way events have transpired. The letter said that these academic leaders were "very pleased" with Sullivan's "superb" leadership, and that they were stunned by her ouster, and frustrated by the lack of faculty knowledge of the reasons behind the board's action. The letter called for "a full airing" of the issues.
  • A petition is gathering support calling for the board to reverse itself and to keep Sullivan.
  • Helen Dragas, the rector (board chair) released a letter to the faculty in which she said that "the Board of Visitors understands the serious concern and anxiety raised by the announcement of President Sullivan’s agreement to step down. We comprehend how deeply the entire University family feels a sense of loss and distress at what appeared to be an abrupt turn of events." However, citing confidentiality requirements, Dragas said she could not detail the issues that divided Sullivan and the board. She did, however, say that "there was ongoing dialogue with the President over an extended period of time, regarding matters for which we are responsible. These include ensuring the long-term health and well-being of the University through development of a credible statement of strategic direction and a long-term resource plan."



Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Jennifer Clack of the University of Cambridge reveals how recent discoveries are providing paleontologists with a better understanding of the development of early tetrapods. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


Thursday, June 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Many Greeks are furious with Germany over its stance on the economic crisis in Greece, but Greek students are flocking to German language courses, The Times of London reported. Students are studying at German programs in Greece or traveling to German-speaking countries to learn the language, hoping to stay and find a good job. "I think the situation in Germany and the way they live is of high quality," said Elena Mavromatti, a law student at the University of Athens, who is taking advanced night-classes at the Germanika language school.


Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 3:00am

The City University of New York is making big strides on community college student achievement with its Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) effort, according to a report released today by MDRC, an education and social policy research firm. The program, begun in 2005, is an attempt to improve graduation rates. It is aimed at students with remedial needs, and requires participants to enroll full-time in exchange for enhanced support. The study found that it boosts student retention, credits earned and success in remediation -- with a 15 percent increase in students who successfully finish their remedial coursework.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 3:00am

Career Education Corporation is responding to a new inquiry from a national accreditor related to job placement rates, according to a corporate filing by the company. The Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges has asked the company, which owns 90 for-profit college campuses, to "show cause" for why accreditation should not be withdrawn from 10 of its institutions. The inquiry stems from the company's earlier acknowledgment that it lacked sufficient documentation for some job placement data. That revelation led to a similar inquiry by another national accreditor -- the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools -- which later cleared the company.

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 3:00am

Slate published an analysis of the relative popularity (as topics to academics) of various pop culture topics. Judging popularity by the total papers, books and essays produced by academics, the most popular topic (by far) is "Buffy the Vampire Slayer," followed by "Alien Quadrilogy," and "The Wire." Far behind is "The Simpsons."

Wednesday, June 13, 2012 - 4:23am

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that the University of Cincinnati's limits on protests or political activity outside a "free speech zone" are too restrictive, Cincinnati.com reported. "It is simply unfathomable that a UC student needs to give the university advance notice of an intent to gather signatures for a ballot initiative,” the judge wrote. “There is no danger to public order arising out of students walking around campus with clipboards seeking signatures.” The ruling barred the university from using its existing policy, but permitted the university to propose new rules.


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