Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 3:00am

A federal law barring the awarding of federal financial aid to students with drug convictions negatively affected the college-going rates of affected students, in many cases delaying their enrollment in college after high school and in other cases appearing to deter enrollment altogether, a study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research concludes. The researchers, from Cornell University, use evidence from the temporary ban on aid for those with drug offenses to make the case that "eligibility for federal financial aid strongly impacts college investment decisions."

 

 

 

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 3:00am

A former president of Valdosta State University should be held personally liable for the wrongful expulsion of a student, a federal jury said Friday. The jury found that Ronald M. Zaccari violated the student’s due process rights and must cover the $50,000 due to Hayden Barnes, who was expelled after Zaccari claimed he had been indirectly threatened by a collage Barnes posted on Facebook to protest the construction of two parking garages. In forcing Barnes to withdraw, Zaccari ignored the advice of his staff and circumvented normal procedure that should have awarded Barnes with notice and a hearing before being removed. Zaccari also went to questionable lengths to find information that could be used against Barnes, such as medical records. Although the jury found Zaccari personally liable, the university could choose to pay the fine for him.

It's highly unusual and perhaps unprecedented for a president to be found personally liable in such a situation, said Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which helped Barnes litigate his case. Lukianoff, who wrote about the case in his recent book Unlearning Liberty, said this was one of the worst violations of due process he's seen.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013 - 3:00am

When word spread this weekend that a massive open online course about online education had to be suspended due to technology problems that left many students angry, officials from Coursera and the Georgia Institute of Technology were not available for comment. In interviews Monday, however, officials of both Coursera and Georgia Tech confirmed that the major issue concerned the ability of the 41,000 students to discuss topics in small groups, and that the technology for that feature indeed was not working. The officials also said that they were confident that fixes would be made in a short time period, and that the course would then continue.

Richard A. DeMillo, director of Georgia Tech's Center for 21st Century Universities, said that officials were "not seeing any insurmountable problems" with the technology. There wasn't enough time to test the features for group discussions, he said. Asked if such testing should have taken place, DeMillo said that it was important to put the issue in perspective. "In a bricks and mortar course, it would have taken months to identify and make changes." DeMillo said it was important to let instructors experiment. "If we tell people to just do safe things, we'll stifle innovation," he said.

Andrew Ng, a co-founder of Coursera, said that the experiment using Google Docs for small group discussions "didn't work well enough," but was "really innovative." He said Coursera is continuing to work on quality control mechanisms that can be used before course launches. But he added that "I'm proud we let instructors experiment with different formats."

DeMillo added that he believed that the small group discussion feature, when it works, will be useful in many MOOCs.

 

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

The Department of Homeland Security on Friday announced a new pilot program in which the agency will work with six colleges and universities to assess and improve their campus emergency and resilience plans. More information about the program and how to apply may be found here.

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Rutgers University will announce today a new center that will focus on research and education to help vulnerable young people making the transition to college. The center will be named for Tyler Clementi, the gay Rutgers freshman who killed himself two years ago after his roommate recorded his meeting with a man, and broadcast it to others. The center will focus on issues of cyberbullying and the challenges facing young gay people, but will not be limited to those issues. Clementi's parents are backing the new effort and working on it with Rutgers.

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Officials of the Palestinian Authority, which does not control Gaza, are criticizing Al-Aqsa University, which is located there, for adopting a dress code for female students, Ma'an reported. Women will be required to wear "Islamic" attire, but officials said that need not be a full body or head covering, but must involve modesty. The university says that the vast majority of women on campus already dress appropriately, and that lectures would be used to encourage others to change their attire. Palestinian Authority officials said that the rules conflict with guarantees of personal freedom that are part of Palestinian law.

 

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Curry College waited almost a week to tell the campus that a student had reported a "group rape" in a dormitory, The Boston Globe reported. The victim reported the attack on January 22, three men were arrested on January 25, and the college notified students and others on January 28. A college spokeswoman said that Curry's policy is to notify the campus if alleged assailants are unknown and that in this case they were known. (Two of them are former students.) Curry is now reviewing its policies. A summary of federal reporting requirements -- by the Clery Center for Security on Campus -- notes that colleges are required to report incidents based on whether a threat may be posed to students, and based on the seriousness of a crime.

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

More than half of the 125 students investigated in a cheating scandal at Harvard University have been told to withdraw for up to a year, Bloomberg reported. Half of those remaining were placed on probation. The investigations and punishments have drawn considerable attention, and some have questioned whether cheating really took place. Critics have said that students were not given clear guidance on the forms of collaboration that were permitted and those that were banned.

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Moody's Investors Service downgraded 34 higher education institutions in 2012 while upgrading only 3, the ratings agency reported Friday, an indicator of ongoing financial challenges facing colleges and universities. Analysts chalked up the downgrades to problems raising net tuition revenue, continued state budget cuts, and enrollment troubles. "Of the seven public universities whose ratings were downgraded in the fourth quarter, five had declines in total full-time equivalent student enrollment," the report notes. Prominent downgrades included the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education and Pennsylvania State University.

Monday, February 4, 2013 - 3:00am

Chinese authorities have blocked Ilham Tohti, a leading scholar from China’s Turkic Uighur ethnic minority, from leaving the country to start a fellowship at Indiana University at Bloomington, the Associated Press reported. Tohti said he was questioned for hours at the airport before being sent home. Tohti has spoken out about the treatment of Chinese minority groups, and been criticized for doing so by Chinese authorities. A spokesman for Indiana told Inside HIgher Ed that Tohti was scheduled to start as a visiting scholar in Central Eurasian studies at the university.

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