Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

Lady Gaga on Wednesday announced that she is creating the Born This Way Foundation to focus on youth issues such as preventing bullying and promoting self-confidence in young people. While only a few details have been released, one key player in creating the foundation will be the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, at Harvard University. John Palfrey, faculty co-director of the center, released this statement: "It seems Hollywood launches foundations all the time, but I can't recall an artist of Lady Gaga's reach or caliber who has done the months of due-diligence and behind-the-scenes meetings with the experts before they've launched such a foundation."

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The average student loan debt of the two-thirds of seniors who graduated from college with federal debt in 2010 rose to $25,250, up 5 percent from the previous year, according to a report released today by the Project on Student Debt. The nonprofit group's report shows the debt levels by state and singles out institutions whose students accumulated particularly large and small amounts of debt.

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

WASHINGTON -- An official with the U.S. Department of Labor Wednesday urged community college leaders to steer students to an online career tool the department created earlier this year. Speaking at a policy briefing hosted by Jobs for the Future, Gerri Fiala, the department's deputy assistant secretary of employment and training administration, said the site, dubbed "My Next Move," is particularly helpful for students as they explore potential careers. The briefing was on how nonprofit organizations, high schools and community colleges can help students who drop out of high school get back on track for college. Fiala and other federal policy makers who spoke at the event stressed the need for collaboration between two-year colleges and student employers.

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

The Wisconsin Assembly voted Wednesday to end consideration of race in a state grant program for disadvantaged students attending colleges in the state, The Capital Times reported. The program is for nontraditional students, with eligibility determined by such factors as having a disability, being a first-generation college student, or being black, Native American, Latino or Hmong. The program's authorization was amended in the Assembly to remove minority group membership as part of the criteria. While it is not clear that there is a speedy path for the bill to be enacted, the vote stunned and angered supporters of efforts to recruit more minority students.

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

University of Charleston President Ed Welch announced Wednesday that the university would be cutting tuition for next year's incoming freshman and transfer students by 22 percent, from $25,000 to $19,500. On top of that, the university is guaranteeing at least $5,500 in aid for all returning students, so that no student pays more than $19,500. In a video about the announcement, Welch said the change was made to get away from the high-tuition, high-aid model of financing education there. Several presidents in recent years have started questioning whether such a model is sustainable. The announcement comes on the heels of a similar move by the University of the South, which announced in February that it was cutting its $49,000 tuition about 10 percent for this fall.

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 4:27am

An Ivy Tech Community College faculty member died Wednesday after falling from a tower where he was teaching students wind turbine technology, The Courier and Journal reported. Classes were canceled for the rest of the day. The cause of the fall has yet to be determined.

 

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

A petition calling on Congress to protect Pell Grants, student loans and other financial aid programs from budget cuts has gathered more than 37,000 signatures and will soon be delivered to members of the "super committee," the bipartisan panel charged with cutting $1 trillion from the nation's budget by the end of this month, as well as other Congressional representatives. The "Statement of Support" from the Student Aid Alliance, a group of 74  higher education associations that lobby to protect financial aid programs, was launched Oct. 25. Signers include students, faculty and administrators from all sectors.

"Recent budget deals have already cut $30 billion from the student aid programs, sacrificing some students’ benefits to pay for others. States across the country are cutting higher education from their own budgets," the statement reads in part. "That’s why it’s more important than ever to preserve, protect and provide adequate funding for the core federal student aid programs — such as Pell Grants and student loan benefits. Together, these programs offer students an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills our nation demands for a strong recovery."

Thursday, November 3, 2011 - 3:00am

Career Education Corp. announced Tuesday that its CEO would resign after an outside investigation found "improper" practices in the company's determination of job placement rates. The company's third quarter report to the Securities and Exchange Commission said that the review by an outside law firm had found that some of Career Education's health education and art and design schools did not have sufficient documentation to back up job placements, and that 13 of its 49 schools in those fields had failed to meet the placement rate requirements of the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools. While a news release did not specifically say so, it appeared that those developments had prompted the resignation of Gary E. McCullough as president and chief executive.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 4:24am

Pearson, the e-learning company, is teaming up with the adaptive software developer Knewton to improve its popular line of e-tutoring products. In a release on Tuesday, the company announced that "Knewton’s engine will power Pearson’s digital content, including its popular MyLab and Mastering series." That "engine" is Knewton's learning platform, which uses algorithms "identifies each student’s strengths, weaknesses and unique learning style" and adapts accordingly as he work through problem sets. Pearson and Knewton have both been on the front edge of a trend in e-learning software that emphasizes "personalized" learning experiences, especially for students in developmental programs.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011 - 3:00am

A recent nationwide study found that the shared student experience of the "freshman 15" is nothing more than a myth. In reality, women gain 2.4 pounds and men gain 3.4 pounds on average,  according to the study. The study, conducted by Jay Zagorsky, an Ohio State University researcher, and Patricia Smith, a professor of economics at the University of Michigan at Dearborn, pulled data from National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997, which cataloged statistics, including weight, of more than 7,000 people age 13 to 17. The participants have been interviewed every year since 1997. The study results showed that college students gain weight slowly throughout college, and no more than 10 percent of all college freshman actually gained 15 pounds or more.

"Repeated use of the phrase “the Freshman 15,” even if it is being used just as a catchy alliterative figure of speech, may contribute to the misperception of being overweight, especially among young women," the study states.

 

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