Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4:32am

Chairs are transforming Harvard Yard. The Boston Globe reported that an experiment of placing brightly colored, portable chairs in Harvard University's iconic space has turned into a popular feature of the quad. While initial reaction was that the chairs "did not look very Harvard," students and visitors now use them not only to sit but to block the sun from electronic screens.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 3:00am

A U.S. District Court in Arizona last week approved a $145 million payment by Apollo Group, Inc., to settle a class action lawsuit, according to a corporate disclosure. Originally filed in 2004, lawyers for shareholders had alleged that company officials made misleading statements about a Department of Education investigation of student recruiting practices at the University of Phoenix. The court dismissed the securities-fraud verdict against Apollo and former company officials as a result of the settlement.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, William Wood of Humboldt State University explains the search for natural sources of new antibiotics. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 3:00am

Internet2, the higher education technology consortium, on Tuesday announced new master agreements with 16 companies in what the consortium is calling a major step toward eliminating the “transaction costs” that have made campus-based technology deployments unduly expensive for universities and vendors alike. Instead of negotiating individual contracts, Internet2’s 221 member colleges essentially will be able to opt in to a licensing agreement the consortium negotiated with more than a dozen providers of cloud computing services, including Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Dell and Desire2Learn.

The agreements are part of Internet2’s Net+ Services project, which it unveiled last year. The goal of the project is to work with technology companies to tailor versions of their cloud-computing services to match the needs of colleges and universities, then enable institutions to buy licenses for those services through Internet2, rather than negotiating with companies on an individual basis -- a tedious, redundant exercise that was driving up the cost of doing business for everyone involved, says Shelton Waggener, the CIO of the University of California at Berkeley.

Internet2’s negotiations on behalf of its members do not merely constitute a group discount deal, but a “new operating paradigm for delivering services to higher education,” says Waggener. Campus technology budget makers “cannot trim [their] way to success,” he says. “It’s about creating models that allow us to keep the dollars in the classroom and the labs and not spend them on lawyers for contracts or shipping costs or wasted capacity.”

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 3:00am

President Obama has taken his call for Congress to extend the 3.4 percent interest rate on subsidized student loans to Iowa, North Carolina and Colorado -- all battleground states in this fall's election. But the presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney said during a press event Monday that he agrees with Obama, saying he supports an extension of the low interest rate, which would otherwise double for subsidized loans made after July 1. 

"Particularly with the number of college graduates that can't find work and can only find work well beneath their skill level, I fully support the effort to extend the low interest rate on student loans," Romney said, according to the Huffington Post, which reported that Romney volunteered his position on the interest rate after no reporters asked about it during the news conference, his first since his path to the nomination became all but certain. "There was some concern that that would expire halfway through the year and I support extending the temporary relief on interest rates on students as a result of student loans obviously, in part because of the extraordinarily poor conditions in the job market."

Romney has said little about federal financial aid and other higher education issues so far, although he told college students in March to "shop around" on tuition prices and not expect the government to forgive their debt. He also endorsed Representative Paul Ryan's budget plan, which would have let the interest rate rise.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 4:28am

A proposal released by a research center at the University of California at Berkeley and endorsed by Berkeley leaders on Monday would give individual University of California campuses control over setting their own tuition rates for graduate and out-of-state students, deciding what share of students should come from outside of the state and the ability to decide on construction projects, The Los Angeles Times reported. "The present monolithic structure of governance inadvertently results in lost opportunities for the campuses. The situation calls for many elements of governance to be closer to the local level," says the proposal. While the system's Board of Regents would maintain control over other key issues, the proposal would represent a major shift toward campus autonomy. Campus such as Berkeley, UCLA and the University of California at San Diego -- all major players in research and private fund-raising -- would likely see immediate benefits from such a system, but smaller campuses are expected to raise concerns. Mark G. Yudof, president of the system, said Monday that he could not back the proposal in its current form, but was willing to talk about issues raised by the plan.


Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 3:00am

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Monday that a consortium led by New York University is the second winner in the city’s Applied Sciences NYC Initiative, in which the city sought competitive bids from universities to develop applied-sciences campuses in the city. The larger prize was awarded in December to a partnership of Cornell University and Technion–the Israel Institute of Technology after a highly publicized competition between the pair and Stanford University.

Together with a consortium of academic and corporate partners, NYU and NYU-Poly plan to develop a Center for Urban Science and Progress at a city-owned building in downtown Brooklyn. The center will focus on studying and developing solutions to urban challenges in an interdisciplinary manner. NYU will be responsible for the cost of relocating the city equipment housed at the site, estimated to be about $50 million, though the city is granting the university about $15 million in benefits.

The consortium is composed of NYU and NYU-Poly, Carnegie Mellon University, the City University of New York, the Indian Institute of Technology - Bombay, the University of Toronto, and the University of Warwick, as well as corporate partners including IBM, Cisco, Siemens, and Xerox.

On a related note, a profile of Stanford University published Monday in The New Yorker spelled out some of the tensions that emerged between the city and the university, which was favored by many to win the competition until it pulled out days before Cornell was selected as the winner.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 4:30am

Westminster College, in Missouri, announced plans Monday to open a campus in the fall of 2013 in Mesa, Arizona. The college plans to offer majors in international business, environmental studies and transnational studies. Mesa has been encouraging colleges from elsewhere to set up programs in the area.


Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 3:00am

The Aspen Institute on Monday released a list of 120 community colleges that made the cut to be considered for the second annual Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, which comes with a $1 million payout. The institute changed its criteria for evaluating community college performance, and this year's list includes 40 different institutions, meaning one-third of last year's eligible colleges were bumped. The process is based on graduation rates, degrees awarded, student retention rates and "equity in student outcomes." Josh Wyner, executive director of the institute's College Excellence program, said the formula was tweaked to better reflect steady performance rather than short-term spikes in numbers. The institute plans to name 10 finalists in September.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012 - 4:34am

The University of Wisconsin at Madison has agreed to change the language in a letter it sends to accepted graduate students, following a complaint that one part of the letter was deceptive, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. The letter references a stipend and tuition waivers, and the wording that has been questioned also pledged "an additional year of support" for completing a master's degree. What the letter didn't reference was that the additional year involved a smaller stipend and a requirement to work as a teaching assistant.



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