Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, November 14, 2011 - 3:00am

The Citadel on Saturday issued a statement in which it said that it investigated but did not report an allegation it received in 2007 that a summer camp counselor who was a cadet had inappropriate sexual activity with a camper in 2002 in a Citadel summer program. The statement said that the charges could not be corroborated and that the family of the camper was very concerned about its privacy. Nonetheless, the Citadel statement said, the institution has "regret that we did not pursue this matter further." The statement noted that the cadet -- Louis ReVille -- "was a highly respected cadet whose peers elected him chairman of the Honor Court, and at graduation he was presented the award for excellence in public service."

ReVille went on to become a coach and educator and worked with many schoolchildren in South Carolina until his arrest last month on charges of sexually assaulting five boys, The Post and Courier reported. More charges are expected. The Post and Courier filed an open records request last week for material related to the 2007 Citadel investigation of ReVille.

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 4:41am

The U.S. Education Department is investigating whether Marquette University violated campus crime reporting requirements in its handling of two allegations last year of sexual assaults by athletes against other students, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. Local law enforcement officials have criticized the university's handling of the cases, saying that too much time passed before they were notified of the reports. Marquette officials have since announced reforms of the university's procedures for handling such reports.

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Kurt Piehler of Florida State University discusses the World War II incident that defined the mission and meaning of wartime military chaplains. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 3:00am

A feature article in The Los Angeles Times discusses what it was like in South Korea this week on the day of the College Scholastic Ability Test -- a nine-hour exam that determines students' chances of getting in to top universities. Weeks before the test, mothers start to pray and and to leave wreaths at Buddhist shrines. On exam day, early morning flights are postponed to avoid loud noise, and those monitoring the exams are told not to wear flashy clothing or squeaky shoes.

 

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 3:00am

David L. Soltz, president of Bloomsburg University, wants everyone at that Pennsylvania institution to know that Pennsylvania State University is no role model when it comes to reporting possible incidents of child abuse. Soltz sent a memo to everyone on campus Thursday specifying that anyone who sees possible child abuse on campus must call the police first and only then notify one's immediate supervisor. The policy also states that those supervisors, upon being told of a possible incident of child abuse, also have an obligation to call authorities. "What is essential is that university police are notified immediately," Soltz wrote.

 

Friday, November 11, 2011 - 3:00am

College students’ perceptions of their peers’ drinking habits are over-inflated and could contribute to excessive alcohol consumption, according to new research by a professor at the University of Houston. The five-year study, “Social Norms and Alcohol Prevention,” will kickoff in January 2012, surveying 2,000 students at the University of Houston, Loyola Marymount University and the University of Washington.  Clayton Neighbors, the professor heading up the research, said students “actually drink no more than three or four drinks per week, but most students think their peers are drinking much more,” according to a press release. The study will measure student perception of drinking so researchers may better understand what social and individual factors play a role in binge drinking. Neighbors said he hopes the results will be used to better inform drinking intervention programs on campuses, according to the press release.

Thursday, November 10, 2011 - 4:36am

Universities in Kenya have largely been shut down by faculty strikes, The Daily Nation reported. At some universities, the strikes are disrupting final exams and/or graduation ceremonies.

 

Thursday, November 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Adults aged 18 to 34 are overwhelmingly concerned about the cost of college and levels of student debt, regardless of whether they attended college, and oppose cuts to federal student aid programs, according to survey results announced Wednesday by the Institute for College Access and Success, Young Invincibles and Demos: Ideas and Action, three advocacy groups. The survey found that 73 percent of respondents believe college students graduate with too much debt, while only 21 percent described the average debt as "manageable."

Respondents also said they oppose cutting back on federal student aid programs, including Pell Grants and the in-school interest subsidy for low-income borrowers. Majorities of Republicans, Democrats and independent voters said they opposed cutting Pell Grants: 75 percent of Democrats, 77 percent of Independents and 76 percent of Republicans who were given a short description of the grants said they opposed cuts for deficit reduction. They disagreed at similar rates with a proposal to cut the in-school interest subsidy for some student loans.

The survey was conducted by Lake Research Partners (a primarily Democratic polling firm) and Bellwether Research and Consulting (which describes itself as "center-right").

Thursday, November 10, 2011 - 4:40am

The suicides of two undergraduates at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology this fall have shaken the university and prompted a review of all aspects of student life and student services, The Boston Globe reported. While MIT has had suicides before, these two have been particularly upsetting to many on the campus because of the youth of the students, both of whom were 18.

Thursday, November 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Mark David Milliron, who recently announced his resignation from a high-profile position with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, has been named chancellor of Western Governors University Texas. Milliron was deputy director for postsecondary improvement at Gates. He is among several foundation officials who worked on higher education to depart in recent months. WGU Texas is an online, nonprofit university that was created in August in partnership with the state's government. A former president and CEO of the League for Innovation in the Community Colleges, Milliron was a member of WGU's Board of Trustees from 2004 to 2010.

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