Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 10, 2013

The Denver public school district is trying a new approach to deal with the problem of high school graduates who aren't ready for college-level work. A new summer program will offer free remedial education in mathematics and science, The Denver Post reported. More than 60 percent of Denver graduates who enroll in college need remediation of some sort, and the school system wants to bring that number down.

 

June 10, 2013

Phyllis Richman has had a successful career in journalism, and she recently came across a letter she received from a Harvard University professor in 1961, when she was applying to a graduate program there. "[O]ur experience, even with brilliant students, has been that married women find it difficult to carry out worthwhile careers ...  and hence tend to have some feeling of waste about the time and effort spent in professional education," said the letter. It went on to ask Richman to explain how she could balance career and family goals. She didn't answer at the time. But in The Washington Post, she now has done so -- and women of her generation and many of younger generations are praising the response.

 

 

June 10, 2013

Parker Executive Search, currently in the news because of its role in the controversial selection of a new athletic director at Rutgers University, has grown considerably in its influence, and also has been involved in a number of botched searches, The Indianapolis Star reported. The search firm has been involved in 12 executive searches for the National Collegiate Athletic Association, so many searches that one consultant is quoted in the article as saying the NCAA relationship "looks a little incestuous." The article cited examples of Parker-led searches for athletics positions in which the eventual selections had short-lived careers due to failure to win games, arrests for driving under the influence, and an arrest for domestic violence. The article also said that critics say the firm "pushes certain candidates regardless of their fit for a position." At the same time, the search firm has many fans and repeat customers.

June 10, 2013

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has penalized Mississippi State University with reductions in football scholarship and recruiting privileges, the Division I Committee on Infractions announced Friday. In the “serious case,” detailed in the public infractions report, a booster called a star prospect more than 100 times and provided him with impermissible benefits, including a car at $2,000 below its actual value and an offer of $6,000 if the recruit turned down a visit to another university. Additionally, a former assistant coach was cited for unethical contact for failing to report the rules violations and then lying to NCAA and Mississippi State officials during the investigation.

“This is a classic case where a booster inserts himself into the recruiting process in an effort to help his school land the prize recruit so they’ll be better positioned to win more games,” Britton Banowsky, chair of the infractions committee and commissioner of Conference USA, said on a call with reporters. “That’s always a problem. When the school, through an employee, has knowledge of it and doesn’t act, it becomes a more serious problem, obviously.”

However, Banowsky praised the cooperation of Mississippi State, which self-imposed nearly all of the penalties it received. Those include two years’ probation, a reduction in official recruiting days and visits, a football scholarship reduction last year and this year,  and a one-year show-cause order for the former assistant coach, meaning any institution that wants to hire him must persuade the NCAA why the penalties against him (prohibition from recruiting and booster interaction) should not apply to him at the new institution.

June 7, 2013

WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted 224-201 on Thursday to end the Department of Homeland Security's "deferred action" program, which allows young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally should this be "whose parents came to the United States illegally"? otherwise it makes it sound like it was the bringing of the children that was illegal ... to avoid deportation and get work authorization. The provision, an amendment to the department's budget for the 2014shouldn't this be 2014? fiscal year, is unlikely to become law -- the White House vowed it would not in a statement Thursday night -- but illustrates the conflict over immigration as Congress prepares a comprehensive reform.

June 7, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Tim Blackburn of the University of Birmingham reveals the connection between human migration and the extinction of tropical birds. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 7, 2013

An article in The New York Times’s China edition explores the vast scope of Chinese commercial espionage following the arrest of three New York University researchers who are accused of accepting bribes to share secret research findings with Chinese government and industry entities. (The researchers were studying magnetic-resonance imaging technology on a National Institutes of Health-funded grant.) The article quotes a May report from The Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property, which states, “National industrial policy goals in China encourage IP theft, and an extraordinary number of Chinese in business and government entities are engaged in this practice.” The article also quotes China’s Commerce Ministry, which denies being weak on the enforcement of intellectual property rights. 

June 7, 2013

The California Federation of Teachers and other employee unions have filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education over the actions of a regional accreditor, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. The unions had previously lodged their concerns directly with the commission, which accredits California's two-year colleges and is an arm of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. They alleged that the accreditor had acted improperly in slapping a severe sanction on City College of San Francisco -- which faces possible closure -- as well as in its oversight of other community colleges. The commission last week rejected those claims, saying it has followed procedures. So the unions this week asked the Education Department to force the commission to respond more fully to the complaint.

June 7, 2013

Leslie Berlowitz will remove herself from day-to-day activities at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which she leads, during investigations into how grant applications falsely described her as having a doctorate, The Boston Globe reported. The National Endowment for the Humanities is examining three grant applications that listed Berlowitz as having a doctorate. Now the Massachusetts attorney general is also investigating a range of issues, including Berlowitz's compensation package of $598,000.

June 7, 2013

WASHINGTON -- The National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity, a federal panel that meets twice a year to evaluate accreditors and recommend them for Education Department recognition, asked the American Bar Association on Thursday if it was doing more to ensure that law schools were providing good data on whether their graduates have found jobs. Those job-placement rates have been contentious in the past few years in a difficult job market for new lawyers; some graduates have sued their law schools for not providing good data. Representatives of the bar association said they were meeting with firms soon to consider an independent audit of job placement data, beginning with the class of 2014. About 15 institutions are currently not complying with the job placement disclosure requirements of the association's accrediting arm.

The panel voted to recommend that the Education Department renew its recognition of the A.B.A. for three years.

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