Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Friday, October 28, 2011 - 4:26am

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board on Thursday approved the elimination of undergraduate programs in physics at Prairie View A&M University and Texas Southern University, rejecting appeals from the historically black institutions, The Houston Chronicle reported. The board has identified hundreds of programs for elimination, based on low enrollment. But advocates for those two physics programs questioned why the state would be cutting off opportunities to produce more black scientists at a time that many experts say that the only way the United States will achieve its goals in science education is with more participation from all racial and ethnic groups.

 

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Purchase College's Paul Siegel discusses how facing your fears can help you overcome them, even if you don’t know you are facing them. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Several Republican presidential candidates (but not Mitt Romney or Rick Perry) spoke about education on Thursday at a forum sponsored by the College Board and News Corp. Herman Cain, who is currently leading in some polls of Republican voters, said that helping students afford a higher education is not a federal responsibility, Politico reported. "I believe that if a state wants to help with college education, that they should do that," he said. "Secondly, you have people living within communities within states that are willing to help fund those kinds of programs. So I do not believe that it is the responsibility of the federal government to help fund a college education because herein, our resources are limited and I believe that the best solution is the one closest to the problem. The people within the state, the people within the communities, ultimately, I believe, are the ones who have that responsibility."

Representative Michele Bachmann used the forum to criticize President Obama for his plan to reduce the size and duration of some payments on student loans. The Associated Press reported that she said the president was exceeding his authority with the plan, and that there was a "moral hazard" in relieving people of debts that they have accumulated.

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 3:00am

David Barnard, president of the University of Manitoba, on Thursday became the first Canadian university president to formally apologize for the residential schools that were formerly used in the country to educate many Native Canadians, with the goal of assimilating them into the dominant white culture. Barnard made his apology in a statement to Canada's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. He noted that the university did not run the schools, but said that did not remove all responsibility for the system. “We did not live up to our goals, our ideals, our hard-earned reputation or our mandate," said Barnard. "Our institution failed to recognize or challenge the forced assimilation of Aboriginal peoples and the subsequent loss of their language, culture and traditions. That was a grave mistake. It is our responsibility. We are sorry."

Friday, October 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Trustees at Shorter University, a Baptist institution in Georgia, have voted to add a formal faith statement for the first time, as well as a "personal lifestyle statement" for all university employees that requires them to be members of a local church and and reject all sexual activity "not in agreement with the Bible, including, but not limited to, premarital sex, adultery and homosexuality."

Such requirements are not uncommon at Christian colleges, and have been a policy at Shorter for many years, vice president for public relations Dawn Tolbert wrote in an e-mail to Inside Higher Ed. Still, the written statements are a first for Shorter, which also added a document on "the integration of faith and learning" that requires faculty and staff members to submit annual plans on how they will integrate their faith with their working life, as well as a philosophy on Christian education. They are part of an effort to brand the college as a more "intentionally Christian university," Tolbert said.

Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 4:40am

In the year since a student at the University of Notre Dame died when the aerial lift on which he was making videos of practices for the football team fell, many colleges and universities have changed their policies on the use of such lifts, the Associated Press reported. Some universities -- including Notre Dame -- have stopped using the lifts, which were designed for construction sites, not football fields. Others have continued their use but have issued new policies, such as barring their use on particularly windy days.

Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Mary Beth Norton of Cornell University explains why the Salem witchcraft crisis was statistically more dangerous for men who found themselves accused than it was for women. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 3:00am

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Skolkovo Foundation and the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (known as SkTech) announced Wednesday that they would jointly create a new graduate research university in Russia. The new university will offer graduate degrees in these fields:

  • Energy science and technology
  • Biomedical science and technology
  • Information science and technology
  • Space science and technology
  • Nuclear science and technology
Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 3:00am

A federal judge on Wednesday extended a restraining order barring Linn State Technical College from going ahead with its plan to test all new students for illegal drugs, the Associated Press reported. Judge Nanette Laughrey, while not issuing a final ruling on the legality of the plan, suggested it will run into trouble. Students, backed by civil liberties groups, are challenging the drug-testing plan.

Thursday, October 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Israel is experiencing a growth in private master's programs -- which receive no government support -- at otherwise government-funded universities, Haaretz reported. In the last six years, the number of such programs has increased from 26 to 51. The programs charge much higher tuition than the rest of the universities that house them, and proponents say that these offerings help provide funds for the rest of higher education. But critics say the growth of these programs is creating a two-tiered system, where those who can afford to pay more get better access to high-demand programs than do other students.

 

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top