Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

The faculty at Brooklyn College of the City University of New York has passed a resolution condemning the New York Police Department for infiltrating Muslim student groups, the Associated Press reported. The AP earlier revealed the strategy, which professors said threatened the civil rights of their students. "The use of undercover police agents and the cultivation of police informers on campus has a chilling effect on the intellectual freedom necessary for a vibrant academic community," the resolution said. A spokesman for the college said that Karen Gould, the president, shared the professors' concerns.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

Harvard University welcomed the Navy's Reserve Officers Training Corps program back to its campus after 40 years on Tuesday, as the Obama administration formally ended the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy regarding gay service members in the military, The Boston Globe reported.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

The playwright Tom Stoppard has joined a campaign in Scotland against what humanities professors say is the gradual elimination of university programs in Russian, Czech and Polish, The Scotsman reported. Stoppard, who is Czech, said he does not speak the language and that his reaction is based not on his personal ties, but his view of the intellectual contributions of a broad language program. A proposal by Glasgow University to eliminate its Slavonic studies department has set off the latest efforts on behalf of language and culture programs.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Education Department on Tuesday published a report on the status of military service members and veterans in higher education just before the Post-9/11 GI Bill took effect, providing a baseline from which the growth in veterans' involvement in higher education can be measured. The report offers a statistical portrait of the service members and veterans enrolled as undergraduates and graduate students in 2007-8 and compares them to their non-military peers. In total, service members and veterans made up about 4 percent of all enrolled students at that point, they were more likely to be male than were other students, and they were more likely than others to study at private nonprofit four-year institutions, pursue bachelor’s degrees, take a distance education course, and study computer and information sciences.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

  • Dennis Dougherty, interim dean for graduate and professional studies at Cabrini College, in Pennsylvania, has been named dean of the School of Graduate and Professional Studies at Rosemont College, also in Pennsylvania.
  • Ashley Garr, chemistry instructor at Augsburg College, in Minnesota, has been appointed as instructor of chemistry at Central College, in Iowa.
  • Nancy Hensel, CEO of the Council on Undergraduate Research, in Washington, has been chosen as president of New American Colleges and Universities, in Massachusetts.
  • Daniel Lawson, assistant to the coordinator of graduate teaching assistant education at Virginia Tech, has been named director of the writing center at Central College, in Iowa.
  • Patricia N. LeDonne, director of admissions and development and director of enrollment and marketing at Holy Cross Regional Catholic School, in Virginia, has been appointed as director of admissions at Roanoke College, also in Virginia.
  • Christine Picard, a postdoc at Texas A&M University, has been hired as assistant professor in the department of biology and the forensic and investigative sciences program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.
  • Lorelle Semley, instructor of history at Wesleyan University, in Connecticut, has been hired as an assistant professor of history at College of the Holy Cross, in Massachusetts.
  • The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 - 3:00am

    In today’s Academic Minute, Matthew Cain of the University of Notre Dame reveals how a thrill-seeking personality translates into the business world. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 3:00am

    The Boston Globe today explores what The Harvard Crimson has called U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren's "Harvard Problem." The issue is that being a Harvard professor may impress academics, but Republicans hope to use the Cambridge connection to suggest that she is out of touch with voters. Last month the National Republican Senatorial Committee’s communications director called Warren “someone who has spent many years ensconced in the hallways of Harvard.’’ And a Twitter account linked to an adviser to Senator Scott Brown, whom she is challenging, called her a “typical Harvard elitist." If you doubt that such attacks can be effective, ask the academic who thought he could become prime minister of Canada.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 3:00am

    Cornell University and New York University were the top education employers in this year's analysis of the best places to work for people who adopt. The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption examines policies of large workplaces for the annual ratings. Both Cornell and NYU provide their employees with up to $6,000 per adoption and six weeks of paid leave.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 3:00am

    The law school at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has posted correct data about the class of 2014, replacing inflated data that were online previously. The university continues to investigate how the incorrect data were placed there. While the data had not yet been reported to the American Bar Association when the errors were discovered, they were visible to prospective applicants. And had the data not been corrected, they likely would have boosted the law school's rankings in various systems that use ABA data. The accurate data, which the university had independently verified, said that the class had a median score of 163 on the Law School Admission Test and a grade-point average of 3.7. The earlier data had the LSAT median at 168, and the G.P.A. as 3.8.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 - 3:00am

    Donors who believe in social media have pledged $1 for each person (up to $50,000) who either friends the University of Wisconsin at Madison or its alumni association on Facebook, or who becomes a Twitter follower. Will Hsu, who graduated from UW-Madison in 2000 and is one of the donors, said that he views social media as "a powerful way for younger alums and current students to get connected and stay connected with the university.”

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