Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

A global survey of international students found that only 4 percent of them used social media in deciding to select a university outside of their home country, and only 6 percent were influenced by staff members at various campus fairs, Times Higher Education reported. The survey was conducted by i-Graduate, which conducts research and consults on international education issues. William Archer, director of i-Graduate, presented the results last week at a meeting of the European Association of International Education. He said that the findings suggest that many universities are spending too much money on social media, and in-person fairs.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Colleges and universities face major security flaws with Blackboard Learn, potentially leaving systems vulnerable to students who want to change their grades, or others seeking private information, SC Magazine reported. According to the magazine, which is based in Australia, university officials there had to threaten to issue a security alert to get Blackboard to do so.

Matthew Maurer, a spokesman for Blackboard, told Inside Higher Ed via e-mail that the article was correct that there was a security flaw, and that this problem was not unique to Australian universities. But he said that the article (which has been circulating among some American IT officials) had an "exaggerated fashion" in describing the problem. "There's not a single reported case of exposure, just the theoretical," he said. Maurer said that many of the issues were very quickly fixed, and that the company is now providing information to colleges and universities so they can see that there are not serious problems remaining.

He acknowledged that the magazine article played a role in the timing of an alert that went out last week to colleges that use Blackboard Learn. But he said that the company didn't notify everyone immediately only because the normal practice is that "we would never do so until the investigation is complete lest we spread bad information." He added: "We've had a lot of client questions in the last few days as you can imagine, but once they get their hands on the facts most have acknowledged that these are not huge issues."

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Australian universities have been experiencing major security flaws with Blackboard Learn, potentially leaving systems vulnerable to students who want to change their grades, or others seeking private information, SC Magazine reported. According to the magazine, university officials in Australia had to threaten to issue a security alert to get Blackboard to do so.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

The Internal Revenue Service formally declared last week that employers -- including colleges and universities -- can provide cell phones to workers for business purposes without the worker paying any tax on the benefit. The issue has been raised in IRS audits of several major universities, and colleges had been hopeful that this change was coming in the wake of a provision included in the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 last fall, which removed cell phones from the definition of listed property, a category that normally requires additional recordkeeping by taxpayers. But the IRS declaration provides a formal measure of relief to college officials.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Chris Impey of the University of Arizona explores ancient light in an effort to better understand the lifecycle of supermassive black holes. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

A Canadian scientist has been stripped of a federal research grant after authorities found that his application materials and C.V. included claims that he had conducted research and published findings about the research -- even though the research and publications did not exist, Postmedia News reported. The Canadian research agency that took action against the scientist declined to identify him.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Greg Mortenson has declined this year's Grawemeyer Award for contributions to education. The University of Louisville makes the annual award and selected Mortenson -- author of Three Cups of Tea and a philanthropist who has promoted the development of schools for girls in Afghanistan and Pakistan -- just before questions were raised on "60 Minutes" about his book and about the management of his philanthropy. A university press release quoted Mortenson as saying that the award was a great honor, but that he was declining nonetheless. “I wish to humbly decline the Grawemeyer Award as a way to acknowledge the dedication and sacrifice of all those who have gone before us and those who continue to promote peace through education,” Mortenson said. The scandal over Mortenson's work has put many colleges in an awkward position because they assign his work and he is a popular speaker on campuses.

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

The Department of Homeland Security on Friday unveiled a new website to assist international students interesting in studying in the United States. Secretary Janet Napolitano said it will be a "one-stop shop" for questions about visas, visa renewals and qualification requirements for students looking to come to the United States to study. She said it is part of the department's initiative to encourage international involvement in higher education. John Morton, director of immigration and customs enforcement, said. "We want to be welcoming and to encourage the best and the brightest with a system marked by integrity."

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Today was supposed to be the day when the next big shoe dropped in the frenzied free-for-all over conference affiliations in big-time college football, with the governing boards of the Universities of Oklahoma and Texas scheduled to meet to discuss expected moves by those institutions. But the Atlantic Coast Conference sent another set of shock waves through the industry by announcing Sunday that Syracuse University and the University of Pittsburgh had decided to bolt the Big East Conference and join the ACC.

The moves by Pitt and Syracuse appeared to take other members of the Big East Conference by surprise, and angered some, who questioned whether Pitt's chancellor, Mark Nordenberg, was shooting straight when, as chair of the league's board, he called for Big East solidarity on several key issues. The defections appear to put the Atlantic Coast league on a path to becoming the first 16-member Football Bowl Subdivision league and to threaten the viability of the Big East as a football conference.

Developments later today, meanwhile, could put another existing league at similar risk, if Texas and Oklahoma, as expected, say they are leaving (or considering leaving) the Big 12 Conference for the Pacific-12 Conference (or perhaps another league, in Oklahoma's case).

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Italian authorities announced Friday that they had discovered a fake university operating in Verona, AFP reported. About 10 students were paying $9,600 for courses that they were falsely told told would be recognized elsewhere. The university was called Carolus Magnus (Charlemagne).

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