Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

The programs that train special education teachers for K-12 systems will lose up to half of their faculty members to retirements in the next five years, according to the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment, a report being issued today by researchers at Claremont Graduate, Vanderbilt and Western Carolina Universities. These retirements pose a significant danger because special education programs already have a shortage of faculty members. The report outlines ways that programs can produce more Ph.D.'s, who in turn can meet the demand for trained teachers for schools.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues on Tuesday issued its full report on experiments conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in which people in Guatemala were exposed in the 1940s to sexually transmitted diseases, and the conclusions are clear from the report's name: "Ethically Impossible." President Obama charged the panel with studying the research after it became public last year. Amy Gutmann, chair of the commission and president of the University of Pennsylvania, said: “In the commission’s view, the Guatemala experiments involved unconscionable basic violations of ethics, even as judged against the researchers’ own recognition of the requirements of the medical ethics of the day. The individuals who approved, conducted, facilitated and funded these experiments are morally culpable to various degrees for these wrongs."

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

A new federal study shows great variation by race in the degree to which parents of would-be college students are saving for their children's postsecondary costs. The study, which provides data from a longitudinal study of American ninth graders, shows that among those students whose parents expected them to enter postsecondary education and who planned to help pay for their education, 41 percent of the parents of Asian-American ninth graders and 23 percent of the parents of white ninth graders reported saving more than $25,000 for their child's postsecondary education, compared to 12 percent of the parents of black ninth graders and 8 percent of the parents of Latino ninth graders.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Adrian College in Michigan must make broad improvements to its women’s athletics programs – including the addition of at least one sports team and a locker room in its multipurpose stadium – under a settlement between the college and the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights. The Resolution Agreement, which was first reported in the Title IX Blog, would bring the college into compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which Adrian was accused of violating in two separate complaints filed with OCR in 2007.

It’s not unusual for institutions found in violation of the federal legislation prohibiting sexual discrimination to have to make changes in multiple areas, nor are Adrian’s inequities unique.But, as Title IX blogger and Western New England University associate law professor Erin Buzuvis pointed out in an e-mail to Inside Higher Ed, it is “somewhat unusual” that Adrian must remedy inequities in nearly every program area covered under Title IX. By June 1, 2013, the college must survey and evaluate its female students’ athletic interests and abilities, and address several shortages and inequities in women’s equipment and supplies; scheduling of games and practice times; locker rooms, practice times and competitive schedules; coaching; medical and training facilities; publicity and recruitment.

Among the specific requirements, the college must: boost the number of events in which women’s teams compete to equal that of men’s teams; provide each team with complete practice and game uniforms, including warm-ups and rain gear at levels equivalent to men’s teams; provide recruitment funds to teams in proportion to that gender’s participation rate, or at higher levels for women’s teams, because females are underrepresented in Adrian’s athletics programs; and assign the same number of qualified medical and training personnel to teams of each sex based on the needs of the sport.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

The director of the Arkansas Department of Higher Education must have experience working at a college or university and must hold an advanced degree, according to an opinion issued this week by Dustin McDaniel, the attorney general. The opinion largely quotes from statutes that outline those qualifications. In the case of advanced degree, the statutes state that the director should have degrees similar to those who work at colleges and universities. Two Republican legislators requested the opinion after Governor Mike Beebe, a Democrat, recommended that the next director be a former state senator, whose highest degree is a bachelor's degree. While that candidacy was withdrawn, the dispute has continued. A spokesman for the governor told the Arkansas News Bureau that the Republicans who requested the opinion were seeking "a pricey national search at taxpayer expense."

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Students who favor affirmative action took over a press conference on Tuesday that was designed to question the way race and ethnicity are considered in admissions to the University of Wisconsin at Madison, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. The press conference was by the Center for Equal Opportunity, but its officials left when students arrived. The students then proceeded to talk about the value of diversity.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

At Wheelock College, the philosophy of the athletic program is to pay relatively little attention to whether games are won, and to focus on such issues as improvement and character. The Boston Globe reported that while Wheelock may not be a powerhouse, the approach has resulted in its number of athletes -- and wins -- increasing.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Citing a larger number of violations affecting dozens of athletes over a five-year period, the National Collegiate Athletic Association on Tuesday imposed a set of penalties on Boise State University, including barring its women's tennis team from postseason competition for one season. The association's Division I Committee on Infractions found a panoply of violations of different sorts in different sports: free housing given to several dozen freshman football players in the summer before they enrolled, financial benefits given to a men's track athlete who was academically ineligible to receive them, the provision of housing and other benefits to prospective international athletes in women's tennis and men's track before they enrolled at Boise State, and an extra year of eligibility granted to a female tennis player.

In addition, the former women's tennis coach violated the NCAA's ethical conduct standard by knowingly breaking rules and then lying about it, the infractions panel found. Among the penalties imposed on Boise State by the NCAA and the university itself: recruiting and scholarship reductions, a prohibition in the recruitment of international athletes in men's and women's cross country and track and field, limitations on the duties of two former coaches if they are hired at other NCAA colleges, and the vacation of victories in women's tennis.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 3:00am

A small majority of 265 business schools surveyed by Kaplan will now accept the Graduate Record Examination as a standardized test instead of the (still) dominant test, the Graduate Management Admissions Test. The Educational Testing Service has been encouraging business schools to accept the GRE, and the survey suggests success in that effort. However, a spokesman for the Graduate Management Admission Council, which runs the GMAT, noted that just because business schools are offering the GRE option doesn't mean applicants are abandoning the GMAT. The spokesman said that GMAT registrations in the first seven months of 2011 are 174,933, compared to 164,922 in the comparable period of 2010.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011 - 3:00am

Alumni of Cornell University's Africana Studies and Research Center on Monday issued a harshly worded statement denouncing the university's recent decisions about the center as "regressive and colonial in nature." Cornell recently brought the center -- which had been freestanding -- under the College of Arts and Science. While that move was opposed by some at the center as intruding on its autonomy, Cornell officials argued it would allow for better support of the center, and was reflective of the way other interdisciplinary programs were housed at the university. Further, the university announced plans to add new faculty lines and to create a Ph.D. program. In August, the university announced that efforts had failed "to identify a faculty member who was both willing to serve and acceptable to a substantial majority of the Africana faculty...." So the university appointed two administrators from outside the center to jointly lead the program. The Africana alumni group said this amounted to holding "the Africana Center hostage under an externally appointed administrative regime." A Cornell spokesman said that the university was preparing a response to the alumni.

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