Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:28am

Last year, the Board of Regents in Georgia made it much more difficult for the state's public colleges and universities to admit students who lack the legal documentation to live in the state. Many politicians pushed for the shift. Now the state is discussing an unintended consequence of the new rules: a lost football recruit at the University of Georgia. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that a a 6-foot-5, 340-pound offensive lineman who committed to the university in the summer couldn't be admitted. The university was required by the new state policy to reject the student, the son of Samoan immigrants.

 

Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 3:00am

A lawyer told Michigan lawmakers Wednesday that a proposed bill to pave the way for community colleges to offer four-year degrees might violate the state's constitution. The Grand Rapids Press reports that lawmakers were surprised by the testimony of Leonard Wolfe, in which he said two-year colleges would need to become universities for a legal conversion, which would mean collecting no more property tax revenue. Supporters of the bill have said it would create more affordable degree paths for students in certain programs.

Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Elena Oancea of Brown University explains the similarity in how our eyes and skin respond to UV light. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, January 26, 2012 - 4:30am

The Occupy movement is back at the University of California at Davis, but without the tents that led to the infamous pepper spray confrontation last semester, The Sacramento Bee reported. Students this week occupied an unoccupied building on campus (the facility is being readied to hold different offices and so has been vacant) and have vowed to stay there. A university spokeswoman said that the institution was monitoring the situation.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 3:00am

Government programs aimed at encouraging more students to complete degrees in science, mathematics, education or technology should be better coordinated across agencies, a report issued Friday by the Government Accountability Office recommended. The report, undertaken after a request from the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, found that the 209 STEM programs across 13 agencies frequently overlap but that fewer than half of those programs coordinate with similar efforts. Just because programs overlap doesn't mean they are redundant, the GAO wrote in its report. Still, the office recommended that the Office of Science and Technology Policy create a strategy and plan for STEM programs, including how the programs should share information across agencies, and evaluate the programs based on their outcomes. 

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 3:00am

About one-third of South Korean universities have announced tuition cuts, The Korea Herald reported. The government has been urging the cuts, in a year in which student aid is being increased, to make higher education more affordable for Korean families.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 4:28am

John Chadima resigned suddenly this month as senior associate athletic director at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Tuesday night, the university revealed the reason (which has been the subject of much speculation). According to an investigation commissioned by the university, Chadima made an unwelcome sexual advance on a student employee and threatened to fire him if he reported the incident, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. The advance took place after a Rose Bowl party for students who worked for the athletic program. The student said he was asked to stay after the party to drink with Chadima. Through his lawyer, Chadima released a statement in which he said that the incident "is certainly not reflective of the type of person I am, my lifestyle, my management style or my faith or beliefs.... However I make no excuses and have come to the realization that over the past few months, alcohol had controlled and consumed my life," the statement continued. "I am taking steps to correct that problem in my life at this time."

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 4:29am

An influential New York State senator has introduced legislation to create new felony charges of "facilitation of education testing fraud" and "scheming to defraud educational testing," as well as a new misdemeanor charge of "forgery of a test," the Associated Press reported. While authorities have brought charges against students accused of paying others to take the SAT for them in Long Island, Senator Kenneth LaValle said Tuesday that more tools were needed to combat cheating. LaValle was the prime sponsor of testing legislation in the past that spread to other states, and he said that he hopes New York State will again play that role.

 

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 4:31am

Israel's Higher Education Council has ordered all universities to turn over information about people without bachelor's degrees who have been admitted to graduate programs that require (at least in theory) completion of a bachelor's degree, Haaretz reported. The move follows a report in Haaretz that an anchorman-turned-politician, who lacks a bachelor's degree, was admitted to a graduate program at Bar-Ilan University.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 3:00am

By a vote of 128-58, members of the Faculty Senate at Pennsylvania State University voted down a proposal Tuesday to express no confidence in the trustees of the university, StateCollege.com reported. Many of those who spoke against the motion did so despite frustrations over the way the university's leaders have handled the sex abuse scandal. Jean Landa Pytel, a former Faculty Senate chair, said that it was important for faculty leaders to act in a "meaningful, constructive manner." She said that the vote would have been "seeking revenge for actions which we may not agree with as individuals," and that trustees are already aware of the way professors feel.

 

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