Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

October 4, 2013

The Council of Independent Colleges has launched a new online campaign on the value of liberal arts colleges. The website features data, testimonials from educators and alumni, and information on the careers and lives of graduates of the colleges.

 

October 4, 2013

Officials of the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation on Thursday announced plans to create a tribal college in California, opening near Sacramento next year, The Sacramento Bee reported. Supporters of the project noted that California has the largest population of Native Americans in the United States, but lacks a tribal college. D-Q University was a tribal college in the state, but was shut down in 2005.

 

October 4, 2013

Pasadena City College has asked Hugo Schwyzer, professor of women’s studies and so-called “Internet feminist,” to resign or face disciplinary action, the Pasadena Star News reported. The request comes on the heels of Schwyzer’s arrest last week for suspicion of driving under the influence following an accident that left a woman injured. The professor told the Star News he would not resign until January, when he is scheduled to begin receiving his disability retirement benefits.

Schwyzer has been on leave this semester for mental health issues, which he’s discussed openly on social media. He’s called himself a fraud for “conning” his way into teaching women’s studies, although he did not study it in graduate school, and for having multiple affairs with students. Last month, he said he had continued to sleep with students, even though he’d previously claimed that he stopped doing so in 1998. That admission launched a college investigation into his conduct. Gail Cooper, general counsel for the college, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

October 4, 2013

University of Mississippi officials are investigating an incident in which 20 or so football players and other athletes “from various sports” reportedly heckled theater students performing The Laramie Project, a play about the 1998 killing of the University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard, with gay slurs. In a statement sent to Inside Higher Ed, Chancellor Dan Jones and Athletics Director Ross Bjork apologized on behalf of the university, and said that after meeting with athletes to talk about what happened, they would work with student affairs officials and the campus Bias Incident Response Team “to determine the facts and appropriate next steps.” Football coach Hugh Freeze also tweeted Thursday that “We certainly do not condone any actions that offend or hurt people in any way. We are working with all departments to find the facts.”

The faculty member who directed the play told The Daily Mississippian student newspaper, which first reported the incident, that audience members disrupted the play repeatedly with derogatory terms like “fag” and other “borderline hate speech.” Sources also told the paper that the football players attended the play as part of a requirement for a freshman-level theater course.

“I am the only gay person in the cast,” the paper quoted Garrison Gibbons, a student and theater major, as saying. “I played a gay character in the show, and to be ridiculed like that was something that really made me realize that some people at Ole Miss and in Mississippi still can’t accept me for who I am.”

October 4, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Alicia Melis of the University of Warwick explores the similarities of cooperation between humans and chimpanzees. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

October 4, 2013

The Department of Defense has suspended a program that provides members of the military with money to attend college because of the federal government shutdown. Branches of the armed forces will not authorize tuition assistance for new classes during a government shutdown, a Pentagon official wrote in a blog post this week.

In addition to rejecting new requests for the benefits, the Army said in a statement that it could not process some existing requests that were received before the shutdown began on October 1.

The Department of Veterans Affairs, meanwhile, said it is continuing to process veterans’ education benefits, but that could stop if the shutdown drags on longer than several weeks. The agency has already closed its education call center because of the shutdown. 

October 4, 2013

A University of Alabama assistant strength and conditioning coach was placed on administrative leave for loaning an athlete money in violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules, The Tuscaloosa News reported. The football safety, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, was suspended from the nation’s top football team Wednesday for an unspecified violation of team rules. Corey Harris apparently loaned Clinton-Dix “an amount less than $500” during the summer.

Under the new NCAA enforcement structure, head coach Nick Saban, whose $5.3 million annual salary makes him the highest-paid coach in college football, could be punished for the violation. The new model presumes the head coach responsible for violations committed by his or her staff, unless the coach can overcome that presumption by demonstrating active promotion of an environment of compliance.

October 3, 2013

California Governor Jerry Brown, a Democrat, signed legislation Wednesday that will tighten the rules on the kinds of bonds that community colleges and school districts can use, The Los Angeles Times reported. The legislation will bar the use of bonds that allow entities issuing them to delay repayment by decades, providing a short-term gain for districts, but creating long-term debt obligations and much more debt than would be the case with shorter term bonds. The new rules limit repayment periods to 25 years (down from 40) and require that interest payments total no more than $4 for every dollar borrowed.

October 3, 2013

Boston College is investigating a student who claimed anonymously on a Facebook "confessions" page that he had raped three women while at the college, The Boston Globe reported. "Confessions" pages are popular on many colleges with students posting anonymously about their hook-ups, crushes or traumas. But the confession to three rapes quickly upset many people on the campus. College officials said that the student who wrote the post turned himself in to authorities and said that it was all a hoax. Paul J. Chebator, dean of students, sent an e-mail to the campus calling the post "very disturbing." Students have organized an event for tonight to discuss the implications of the incident.

 

 

 

October 3, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Shermali Gunawardena of the State University of New York at Buffalo explains how traffic moves along the neuronal highways in the brain. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

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