Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

October 25, 2013

A new survey of how domestic Canadian students experience the internationalization of the campus by a Toronto-based consultancy finds mixed results. 

Of the 1,398 students surveyed by Higher Education Strategy Associates, 43 percent counted at least one international student among the five closest friends they made at university. Overall, the study found that students generally have positive attitudes toward the diversity that international students bring to their social lives and the classroom. 

However, the study also identified a number of tensions. Roughly half of respondents agreed with the statement that the presence of international students has considerably enriched their classroom learning experience. However, roughly a third said there have been occasions in which having international students in class hindered their learning experience.

Students in business and the STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields – which attract large numbers of students from overseas – were least likely to agree that international students had enriched their learning experience. Across all fields of study, students who had a close international friend were more likely to say that international students enriched the classroom experience.

As for the issue of international instructors and teaching assistants, 70 percent of students said they took a course with an international instructor or T.A. who was difficult to comprehend because of his or her English or French ability (the survey is of domestic Canadian students, recall). And 32 percent said an instructor's language level had negatively impacted their ability to succeed in a course.

“None of this should be taken as an argument against internationalization,” the report concludes. “Rather, it suggests two things: first, that the values of internationalization are still in many ways adopted only superficially by Canadian students, and require strengthening. And second, that not enough attention is being paid to the dislocations caused by internationalization, particularly with respect to instructors’ official language abilities. Mitigating those problems is likely key to sustaining students’ support for internationalization over the long run; without it, the large minorities who have had less than positive experiences with campus internationalization could turn into majorities, and the resulting discontent could imperil the entire process."

October 25, 2013

The teaching assistant at the University of Iowa who mistakenly sent nude photographs of herself to her class is no longer leading the section, the Associated Press reported. The photos were sent as an attachment that was apparently meant to be a file with the answers to homework problems. The university said that the TA is still employed, but is performing non-teaching duties.

October 25, 2013
Faculty members housed in several main academic buildings at the University of Dayton were surprised Thursday to receive an e-mail from the institution telling them to take down "homemade" and "personal" signs on their office doors and in hallways, lest they be removed by maintenance personnel. Some faculty members said it was a violation of academic freedom, fearing they were being censored. "This includes information about campus events (e.g. a talk) and photos of historic figures (Nelson Mandela or Adrienne Rich), articles from newspapers, as well as anything that would note advocacy (and safe place) for any group/individual who needs it," one professor wrote in an e-mail to an academic listserv. "Is this happening at other universities you work at? How do I fight back?"
 
But Cilla Shindell, university spokeswoman, said the e-mail, sent at the request of campus maintenance, was merely a reminder of existing guidance that faculty members should install small bulletin boards instead of hanging things directly on doors or walls in those buildings, which were refurbished several years ago. Greg Scholtz, director of tenure, academic and governance for the American Association of University Professors, said the organization has no policy related to wall or door hangings, and a university policy against them would violate academic freedom only if it was a form of censorship. Still, said Carolyn Roecker Phelps, associate professor of psychology and president of Dayton's Academic Senate, "Personally, I do think it detracts from what we consider the life of the university. ...You can see it when you walk down the hallways. Where there are things posted on doors there are exchanges happening. Even without the person being [in his or her office], it adds a richness I think will be lost."
October 25, 2013

Career Education Corporation, a major for-profit higher education chain, on Thursday announced the sale of its European education properties to a private equity firm. The company said it expects to receive $277 million in cash for the deal, which includes all of the for-profit's international schools division. Career Education's share price shot up 51 percent after it announced the news.

October 25, 2013

The University of Kansas has ended the suspension of a professor whose Twitter comment about the National Rifle Association angered many -- but the professor will not be returning to class this year. David Guth "has been assigned additional non-classroom responsibilities in the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications for the remainder of the semester, including various service and administrative assignments," said a statement from the university. "Those assignments will be completed away from campus to the greatest extent possible. The decision, made by Provost Jeffrey Vitter and approved by Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little, is based on the recommendation of a seven-member committee of faculty and staff, assembled at the chancellor’s request. The committee was asked to assess the current environment and recommend whether Guth could return from administrative leave without disrupting the student learning environment."

 

October 25, 2013

As his lawyers warned he would, Evan S. Dobelle sued Westfield State University trustees and other officials Thursday challenging his being placed on leave a week ago, Masslive reported. Dobelle's lawsuit -- which follows Westfield State's decision last week to push him out amid allegations of misspending of state money -- accuses several trustees and the state's commissioner of higher education, Richard M. Freeland, and others of conducting a "guerrilla war" to force him from his job.

October 25, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Stephanie Pau of Florida State University explains why tropical forests may already have all the heat the ecosystem can tolerate. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

October 25, 2013

A major bank is seeking to dismiss a lawsuit filed against it by the University of Arizona Foundation and a major university donor that blame the bank for its role in an offshore tax shelter they all had stake in and the federal government later cracked down on.

The foundation and Karl Eller, a major donor who is the namesake of the university’s business school, claim in federal court they were duped by a number of financial advisers, including UBS, into investing in a “sham tax shelter.”

Eller and his wife invested more than $30 million in Cayman Island’s tax shelters and then donated part of their stake to the university foundation. Now, the Ellers and the foundation are seeking unspecified damages from UBS after the I.R.S. cracked down on the deal. Tax documents introduced into the court file by UBS show federal tax officials sought a tax adjustment from the foundation, but it's unclear what the foundation lost in the deal, if anything, because the foundation earlier this month declined to comment or to specify what sort of monetary damages it is claiming to have suffered.

In a federal court filing Thursday, UBS said the lawsuit should be dismissed because, among other things, the Ellers have failed to make their case. UBS also notes that the Ellers were told there was a 30 percent chance the I.R.S. would frown on the deal before the Ellers made their multimillion-dollar investment.

UBS's court filing also said the University of Arizona Foundation has failed to make any claim against UBS in the litigation. 

At the heart of the deal is the a complex financial instrument known as a contingent deferred swap, which the Ellers opted to use in an effort to reduce their tax liability and free up money they could turn over to the university foundation. A U.S. Senate investigation described the swaps as ways to generate “phony paper losses for taxpayers, using a series of complex, orchestrated transactions, structured finance, and investments with little or no profit potential.” The “phony paper losses” could then be used to reduce an investor’s tax burden.

The Ellers have given university or the foundation more than $23 million over the years. 

October 25, 2013

Students at the University of Rochester have been having an intense debate over a Confederate flag placed by one student in his residence window, The Democrat and Chronicle reported. A graduate assistant asked the student to take the flag down, but the university now says he had the right to have it up. But that doesn't mean everyone thinks he should have displayed the flag. The student says he is trying to reflect his cultural heritage, but many other students say that the flag is an insult to black students and others for whom Confederate symbols are viewed as hostile.

 

October 25, 2013

Application and enrollments rates at medical colleges are steadily increasing, but the Association of American Medical Colleges said the number of graduates could surpass the number of spots available in residency training programs in the next two years.

AAMC released data Thursday about application and enrollment rates and called for Congress to increase federal support for residency training programs to avoid a projected physician shortage.

In 2006, the association called for a 30 percent increase in enrollment at medical colleges to avoid projected physician shortages. Medical colleges are on track to meet that goal by 2017, said Darrell Kirch, AAMC's president and CEO. This year, 14 medical colleges increased class sizes by more than 10 percent. Now, the number of medical students has exceeded 20,000 for the first time. About half of the growth is attributed to the opening of medical colleges at the University of California at Riverside, University of Arizona at Phoenix, Central Michigan University and Quinnipiac University.

“Medical schools are doing their job, but this will not alleviate the doctor shortage unless we have a corresponding increase in residency training positions,” Kirch said.

Currently, there are about 25,500 first-year residency positions, he said. But, it’s likely that the number of medical college graduates will surpass the number of residency positions available in the next two years as enrollment rates are increasing at both allopathic and osteopathic medical colleges.

The total number of applicants for medical colleges grew by 6.1 percent and the first-time enrollment rate increased by 2.8 percent in 2013, according to the report. The rate of increase in both applicants and first-time enrollees doubled in the past year. In 2012, the total number of applicants increased by 3.1 percent and the first-year enrollment rate increased 1.5 percent.

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