Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Because expected state revenues did not materialize, the University of California and California State University systems must each cut an additional $100 million from their operating budgets, California Governor Jerry Brown announced Tuesday. The cuts come on top of $650 million each system had to cut after the budget was finalized this summer. The community college system, also facing new cuts, will probably increase tuition $10 per unit, starting with the summer 2012 session, on top of a $10 increase imposed this fall. In total, the cuts to higher education and other services will total about $1 billion.

The cuts are not entirely unexpected. When Brown signed the state budget in June, many said revenue projections were too optimistic. The Davis Enterprise quoted a University of California spokesman as saying that the system planned to absorb the additional cut and would not ask campuses to contribute.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 4:38am

The Illinois prepaid tuition program is short by about 30 percent -- or nearly $560 million -- to meet the obligations it has made to families, The Chicago Tribune reported. The article is based on a new report by actuarial accountants. The state stopped selling new contracts in the program in September, but has yet to figure out how to meet the commitments the program has already made.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Two of the men who say that they were molested as boys by Bernie Fine while he was associate head coach of the basketball team at Syracuse University on Tuesday announced a suit against the university and Jim Boeheim, the team's head coach, The Syracuse Post-Standard reported. The suit is not over the abuse, but for defamation, based on statements Boeheim made after the allegations became public in which the head coach expressed doubt about the reliability and motives of those coming forward. While Boeheim has since apologized, the men say that they were defamed. They are being represented by Gloria Allred, who is known for her advocacy for victims of sex crimes.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 4:41am

A University of Oklahoma professor has been placed on paid administrative leave following his arrest on two charges of rape and one of lewd acts with a child, The Oklahoman reported. The faculty member, Dwain Pellebon, teaches social work and has been active in local groups that work with children in the juvenile justice system. He has not yet been formally charged in court. A lawyer for Pellebon told a local reporter that he denies all charges.

 

 

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

Jerry Sandusky, whose alleged molestation of boys has created a mammoth scandal at Pennsylvania State University, applied and was rejected for a volunteer football coaching job at Juniata College in 2010, the Associated Press reported. The rejection followed a background check that turned up an investigation into his conduct at a high school where he had volunteered. All this occurred after he left his Penn State job, but before the allegations about him became public. Juniata officials said that, even after he was rejected, he showed up at football events, and that the athletics director had to tell all football officials that Sandusky could not play any role with the football program.

 

Wednesday, December 14, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Michael Schuckers of St. Lawrence University undertakes a statistical analysis of hockey’s most exciting feature. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 3:00am

The top Democrat on the House of Representatives oversight committee announced an inquiry Monday into the pay of chief executive officers at for-profit colleges, saying it was part of a larger questioning by his panel of "excessive" compensation for corporate executives. Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, said in a speech to a consumer group today (see video below) that he had sent letters to the CEOs of 13 for-profit education companies, asking for the compensation agreements to help "determine whether salaries, bonuses, and other compensation are appropriately tied to the performance of students they educate, the vast majority of whom pay for their education with federal tax dollars."

Officials of several of the companies targeted by Cummings issued statements defending the compensation they pay as appropriate; a statement by the Association of Private Sector Colleges and Universities declared the lawmaker's inquiry to be "more politics."






 

 

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 4:27am

An arrest warrant has been issued for the former Dean College freshman who was seen on video attacking a student in a fight over a pair of sneakers, The Boston Herald reported. Images from the video -- in which other students watched and cheered, but did not intervene -- stunned many, prompting many to wonder why no arrests had been made. (The college expelled a total of nine students in the incident.) Authorities said other arrest warrants may be issued, but that the former freshman being charged was the "primary aggressor" in the case.

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 3:00am

While many business schools are struggling with decreased interest in M.B.A. programs, those business schools that are at the top of the prestige lists are spending much more to attract top students, Fortune reported. Among "top 20" programs, at least four business schools -- those of Harvard, Northwestern and Yale Universities and the University of California at Los Angeles -- have increased average scholarship values by more than 100 percent since 2004-5, the magazine reported. "It is an arms race," said Alison Davis-Blake, dean of the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business. "The race has gotten so hot, so fast that schools are using operating money to pay for a lot of these scholarships. No one had ever, ever done that in M.B.A. land. Almost everybody is doing it now."

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - 4:30am

The reactions haven't been positive to a new ad to recruit top science students to the University of Ottawa. The Ottawa Citizen reported that the Canadian institution is embarrassed because the ad features bad chemistry. Students are portrayed with beakers or test tubes, apparently engaged in science. One woman is seen standing in front of images of molecules. The problem is that the images of the molecules would be obviously flawed to even a high school chemistry student. Some of the superscripts in the ad should be subscripts, some of the subscripts should be superscripts, some atoms have too many bonds and some don't have enough bonds, professors told the newspaper. Also, the woman seen studying chemistry is actually studying occupational therapy. Another professor reported that colleagues at the University of Montreal were making jokes about chemistry at the University of Ottawa.

 

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