Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, September 26, 2012 - 3:00am

Colorado Technical University improperly awarded financial aid dollars to dozens of students, the U.S. Education Department's inspector general said in an audit this month. The audit, whose findings were challenged by the for-profit college, a unit of Career Education Corp., recommended that the university be required to reimburse the government for $173,000 in improper payments and to examine the records of thousands of other students in its CTU Online unit to see if similar improprieties occurred.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 3:00am

The 10-person commission charged with plotting the future of the University of North Texas at Dallas released its recommendations Monday, largely backing a consultant's advice that the university focus on hybrid learning, minimizing the time to degree, and aligning courses of study with regional needs.

In 2011 the university commissioned 10 leaders from higher education, business, and local government, including Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, to develop a strategy to expand the university from 2,000 students to 16,000 students while decreasing the cost of education and improving graduation rates. The Commission on Building the University of the 21st Century reviewed reports from the consulting firm Bain & Company, brought in on a pro bono basis in 2011 to suggest long-term plans for the 11-year-old institution, and from a group of faculty and staff who, critical of Bain’s analysis, drew up their own recommendations. While Bain advised increasing teaching loads and freshmen enrollment while decreasing the array of majors and integrating online courses, the faculty plan proposed focusing on transfer and underprepared students, developing a liberal arts core, and emphasizing research.

The commission’s recommendations, which its members will vote on a vote of who? dl Tuesday, largely fall in line with Bain’s suggestions. The 10 strategies the commission lists include developing hybrid courses that blend in-person and online instruction, increasing freshman enrollment, providing students with the option for year-round instruction, and working with local business leaders to develop degree programs that mesh with local workforce needs. The report states that the university will have a student focus and will value teaching over research, but acknowledges as one of its guiding principles, “Faculty play a key role in the success of students and UNT Dallas,” and suggests a comprehensive development program to engage faculty and staff in this “new model.”

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 3:00am

Bridgepoint Education Inc. announced Monday that its Ashford University has eliminated 450 positions in admissions and reassigned 400 other admissions employees, half to student services and half to a new department of "student inquiry." The moves are aimed at improving student success, the company said. Ashford is facing a two-pronged accreditation challenge. It is attempting to comply with compliance requests from its current regional accreditor, the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, following a rejected bid for accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges senior college commission.

Ashford says the department of student inquiry will "work with prospective students to ensure they are sufficiently prepared for the demands of a university education."

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jodi Magness of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill discusses an ongoing archaeological dig in Israel that recently unearthed an ancient mosaic floor. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 3:00am

An associate dean at the University of San Francisco’s School of Management resigned from her post due to concerns about the recruitment of large numbers of Chinese students with low levels of English language proficiency and the effect of this on the overall educational experience, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

The former associate dean for undergraduate studies, Dayle Smith, remains on USF’s management faculty; she did not return messages seeking comment on Monday. The university’s provost, Jennifer E. Turpin, told Inside Higher Ed there was disagreement as to whether advising support for international students should be located within the business school (reporting to Smith) or be centrally administered (reporting to the vice provost of student life). USF has opted for the latter strategy. A new universitywide advising center is up and running.

There are 781 Chinese students at USF this fall, up from 589 one year ago. A total of 143 freshmen were admitted conditionally due to their English language levels. Turpin said that the university has actually strengthened its requirements for regular (as opposed to conditional) international admissions. In addition to requiring a Test of English as a Foreign Language Score of 79, USF has added a new requirement that students must have a score of at least 17 on each of the subsections. Students with TOEFL scores below that cutoff are admitted conditionally, and must enroll in intensive English coursework, she said.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 4:23am

Colleges in Division III of the National Collegiate Athletic Association are increasingly attracting athletics director candidates from Division I universities, USA Today reported. Officials say that they are leaving programs with much larger budgets to apply for Division III jobs out of frustration with the scandals and pressures of big-time programs.

"While I may not be dealing with multi-million dollar budgets, household-name coaches [and] me-first donors ... I am seeing the last bastion of true college athletics every day: student-athletes playing truly for the love of the game," said Scott Koskoski, athletics director of Division III Chatham University, who formerly held positions in Division I programs at the University of Denver and Temple University.

Tuesday, September 25, 2012 - 4:25am

The psychometric test used by Israeli universities to admit students has for the first time asked students to write a short composition, Haaretz reported. Educators said that they wanted a writing sample to reflect the role of writing in the university curriculum, and many students who took the test said that they were pleased to have the chance to demonstrate their composition skills.

 

Monday, September 24, 2012 - 4:25am

Cornell University officials are criticizing an e-mail sent to student leaders by an unknown person with the fake signature of David Skorton, the university's president. The fake e-mail appears to suggest a lack of interest in dealing with bias issues on the campus. Tommy Bruce, vice president for communications at Cornell, sent an e-mail to student leaders to tell them the alleged Skorton e-mail was a forgery. In a statement, Bruce said: "In a community of trust, that is Cornell, where our collective efforts should focused on improving the Cornell experience and lifting the climate on campus, this fraudulent behavior can have serious unintended consequences." The text of the fake e-mail can be found here.
 

Monday, September 24, 2012 - 3:00am

A new blog -- MLA Jobs, with the slogan "putting the AACK! back in the tenure track" -- is a parody of the sort of job postings for which job seekers hope to interview at the annual meeting of the Modern Language Association. Many of the fake ads poke fun at the increasingly complicated qualifications that departments are seeking (such as multiple, not necessarily related, specialties). Other postings take aim at recent controversies, such as the push by some trustees at the University of Virginia for the institution to expand online.

A fake ad for the university "seeks Professor of English with specialty in 'educational' technology for setting up MOOCs. Position will be responsible for attracting national attention with bombastic, unproven claims about the future of education; ideal candidate will be heavily read in David Brooks." And referring to the recent controversy over job postings that require applicants to have recent Ph.D.s, there is an ad "looking for soft, fresh faces. Stale Ph.D.s are requested to mist themselves prior to applying."

Monday, September 24, 2012 - 3:00am

The owners of the Hobby Lobby craft store chain on Friday announced that they would give a 217-acre former high school campus in western Massachusetts to the foundation for Grand Canyon University, a for-profit Christian institution. Grand Canyon will open a second on-ground campus at the site, adding to its growing campus in Phoenix and a relatively large online presence. The company hopes to enroll 5,000 students at the new campus by 2018, investing an estimated $150 million in it over five years.

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