Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Jim Hendler discusses efforts to fully understand the far-reaching consequences of the development of the World Wide Web. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

Don Giljum, a lecturer at the University of Missouri at St. Louis, and an uninvited observer of his labor studies course were arrested after an altercation in the class, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The uninvited observer had a camera with him. The course has been the subject of video postings by conservative bloggers -- postings that the instructors and the university have found to be distorted.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

A new WikiLeaks cable shows that the U.S. Embassy in Canada is worried about "anti-American biases" in Canadian universities, The National Post reported. The cable describes incidents observed by an embassy official taking courses at a university in Ottawa of students and faculty members criticizing U.S. policy.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

Following a faculty vote, Tufts University will note successful participation in a Reserve Officer Training Corps on graduates' final transcripts. Though Tufts does not have a ROTC unit on campus, some students train with other ROTC units in the Boston area, and that is not expected to change. But in the wake of the law authorizing the end of "don't ask, don't tell," faculty members voted to more formally acknowledge ROTC service, which has not previously been listed on transcripts. The faculty voted down a proposal that would have noted that service semester-by-semester, opting only for the designation on final transcripts.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

With the smoke not yet cleared from the U.S. Education Department's last round of negotiated rule making -- which produced a series of new regulations aimed at strengthening the integrity of federal financial aid programs and took special aim at for-profit colleges -- the agency appears ready for more. In a statement Friday, department officials said that they would soon be announcing the creation of "one or more negotiated rule making committees to prepare proposed regulations under the Higher Education Act of 1965," and that the agency would hold three public hearings this month (in Tacoma, Wash., Chicago, and Charleston, S.C.) "at which interested parties may suggest issues" for the committee(s) to consider. The announcement gave no clue about what the department might seek to explore in the new round of rule making, as the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities noted with a bit of trepidation.

Tuesday, May 3, 2011 - 3:00am

Susan Su, the president of Tri-Valley University, has been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges that the institution was a sham university operated as a front to help non-Americans obtain U.S. visas, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Authorities said that Su accepted funds -- allegedly for tuition -- in return for visa assistance, not for education.

Monday, May 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Many law schools in recent years have increased spending on merit scholarships, hoping to attract top students and to boost rankings. But an article in The New York Times noted why some of the recipients feel that the law schools are playing a game of bait and switch. Many of the scholarships have grade-point-average requirements that recipients assume they can meet, but some of the law schools use curves on grading that make it virtually impossible for a good number of scholarship recipients to hold on to their grants. This means they end up enrolling at expensive institutions, and are faced with unexpectedly high bills their second or third years.

Monday, May 2, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Alaska at Fairbanks is appealing to students to stop flushing socks down the toilets of the fine arts complex, The Daily News-Miner reported. Officials say that a recent trend of sock-flushing has caused $15,000 in damage and extra labor costs. The university recently posted signs in bathrooms, asking people not to flush socks, and 40 socks quickly turned up. University officials say that they are mystified by the trend, but those posting comments on the newspaper's website have offered several theories.

Monday, May 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Princeton University suspended a Spanish instructor four days before he killed himself, The New York Times reported. The suicide of Antonio Calvo last month left many students and some colleagues demanding more information about how the university treated Calvo. The university acknowledged that Calvo was on leave at the time of his death, and it was known that he was the subject of a review on whether he could keep his job, but little else has been clear. Documents obtained by the Times showed that the university suspended him with pay, and barred him from campus, writing to him that officials had "received information from multiple sources that you have been engaging in extremely troubling and inappropriate behavior in the workplace." The letter did not specify the nature of that behavior, but sources have said that while Calvo was popular with the undergraduates he taught, he clashed with graduate students whose teaching he supervised and sometimes considered inadequate.

Monday, May 2, 2011 - 3:00am

Amar Bose, the founder of the company with his name that makes high-end audio products, has donated a majority of the corporation's stock to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, stipulating that MIT will benefit from dividends, but will not vote on company direction. The New York Times reported that the gift has raised the eyebrows of some tax experts, who note that MIT cannot vote or sell the stock. Some experts told The Times that more detail should be released on the gift, and that it may not be fair to call it a full gift, given the limits on MIT's use of the stock.

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