Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, June 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The question of whether law schools are adequately preparing their graduates for jobs after graduation -- and accurately informing them -- has been fodder for hunger-striking protesters and other critics. Now those issues are a matter for the courts, as a recent law graduate has sued California's Thomas Jefferson School of Law in state court, National Law Journal reported. The class action filed by Anna Alaburda alleges that "[f]or more than 15 years, TJSL has churned out graduates, many of whom have little or no hope of working as attorneys at any point in their careers," and that the school's placement statistics "were false, misleading, and intentionally designed to deceive all who read them." A spokeswoman for Thomas Jefferson told the legal newspaper that the institution follows American Bar Association guidelines on placement data and that its statistics are accurate. "This lawsuit is very much about a larger debate. This is part of the debate about whether it's practical to pursue a graduate degree in these difficult economic times," the spokeswoman said.

Wednesday, June 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The new edition of The Pulse podcast features the second part of an interview with Ray Henderson, president of Blackboard Learn, discussing the company's ePortfolios offerings, its Open Database Inititative, and competition from open source providers. Find out more about The Pulse here.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Backlash continues against the news that some colleges are paying big bucks for graduation speakers. Legislation has been introduced in New Jersey that would deduct from a state appropriation to a public college or university the size of any fee paid to a graduation speaker, The Star-Ledger reported. The move follows criticism of Rutgers University for paying author Toni Morrison $30,000 and Kean University for paying the singer John Legend $25,000 to appear this year. The universities say that students want big-name speakers. One of the legislators sponsoring the bill said that it should be "honor enough to be asked" to attract speakers.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Spending on "529" savings plans for college is up 75 percent in the last two years, the Los Angeles Times reported. The state-sponsored plans provide tax breaks for contributions to various investment funds. The article attributed the surge to continued concern among families about college costs, but also to renewed confidence in the possibility of making money through investments.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeanine Meyer of the State University of New York at Purchase explains the everyday importance of a basic understanding of mathematical concepts. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Five weeks after a tornado forced Shaw University to end its spring semester early, the institution started a summer session on Monday, The News & Observer reported. Student housing on campus is still not available, but Saint Augustine's College is offering housing to Shaw students, and Shaw is providing shuttles between the two campuses.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Amid reports that legislators were not willing to back a plan for the University of Wisconsin at Madison to become independent of the Wisconsin system, Chancellor Biddy Martin acknowledged Friday that the idea -- which had her strong backing -- was unlikely to pass this year, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. Martin backed the plan, arguing that Madison needs independence to thrive in an era of limited state funds. The rest of the university system, however, strongly objected, saying that the system functioned better for the state with Madison as a key part.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The leaders of the University and College Union, the primary faculty union in Britain, are backing the right of students to wear burqas, The Independent reported. Union leaders argue that this right will assure that the universities are welcoming to people of all faiths.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

A local district attorney has criticized Marquette University for its handling of two allegations of sexual assault by athletes in which the D.A. has now determined that it cannot go ahead with prosecution, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. In one case, the accused athlete had a meeting with coaching staff before authorities were notified that the allegations had been made. In both cases, delays from when the university learned of the allegations to when the police learned of them hindered efforts to build a case, officials said. Stephanie Quade, Marquette's dean of students, issued a statement following the criticism: "We're not proud of these incidents or the way in which they were handled. There have been some blunt and direct conversations with offices throughout the university, and we're working on ways to address the issues that have been raised."

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Government officials in Togo have shut the University of Lome, the country's largest university, following student protests, the Associated Press reported. Students have been demanding better food and reconsideration of a new curriculum for which they say they are not prepared.

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