Higher Education Webinars

Confessions of a Community College Dean

In which a veteran of cultural studies seminars in the 1990s moves into academic administration and finds himself a married suburban father of two. Foucault, plus lawn care.

September 16, 2010 - 4:32am
Last week, there was a thought-provoking post over at IHE about lessons that the nonprofit sector of higher ed could learn from the for-profit sector. It’s worth checking out.Having worked in both, I mentioned in the comments that the lower-tier nonprofits, such as community colleges, would do well to learn certain lessons from the for-profits. One really basic one is the importance of addressing a certain kind of cultural capital that elite students already have, but that community college students generally don’t.
September 14, 2010 - 9:33pm
A foreign correspondent (I’ve always wanted to write that) writes:
September 13, 2010 - 10:22pm
Sigh. The New York Times strikes again. This time it’s with a four-part colloquy of important people discussing “why are colleges so selective?”How is someone at a community college supposed to read the question “why are colleges so selective?”a. ironicallyb. as a direct slap in the facec. as yet another indication of just how provincial the New York Times isd. all of the above
September 12, 2010 - 9:18pm
As regular readers know, I’ve been a fan of Kristin Hersh’s for years. She has a new book out, Rat Girl, which is adapted version of her diary from 1985. It’s far better than that description makes it sound.
September 9, 2010 - 9:55pm
An occasional correspondent writes:
September 8, 2010 - 10:32pm
A new correspondent writes:I'm a librarian at a community college. The Library and Tutoring Center together make up the Learning Resources department and we're part of the Liberal Arts Division. The dean of our division has been in his position for (many) years. One of his primary goals since he arrived here has been the renovation of the library building to update it and reallocate much of the library's space to other support-services like the Tutoring Center, Reading Lab, and Language Lab. The construction has finally begun.
September 7, 2010 - 10:20pm
The first week of classes has a charm all its own. Students are everywhere, professors are rested and ready, nobody’s behind yet, parking is a nightmare of Biblical proportions, a few professors turn up missing at the last minute, and everyone -- everyone -- complains about the bookstore.It’s the same every year. It’s actually sort of reassuring.I can count on hearing certain things, and have already gone through most of the list for this year:“Books are too expensive!” Yes, they are.“Can you believe what some students wear in public?” No, I can’t.
September 6, 2010 - 10:16pm
A new correspondent writes:After completing my MA in Rhetoric and Writing in 2008, I started adjuncting at a community college, teaching multiple sections of academic writing. After one quarter of teaching, the economy tanked, the state slashed funding to higher ed, my college felt the squeeze, and sections were cut. As a new adjunct with no seniority, I was among the first to be told the college wouldn’t be able to offer me any teaching work in the foreseeable future.
September 2, 2010 - 8:17pm
--I don’t get the Apple tv thing. It only gets two networks, and they’re ones that I can get over the air for free. Apple, I enjoy following you guys, but you’re missing the point here. The point is to make it possible to drop cable tv, or at least to cut it back all the way to the very basics. Gaining the option of paying again to watch shows I could have tivo’d the first time they were on, on a connection I already have to keep anyway, is not a selling point. I don’t need another way to get ABC. I need another way to get Comedy Central.
September 1, 2010 - 9:49pm
In a follow-up to an earlier discussion, a correspondent wrote:

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