Higher Education Webinars

Confessions of a Community College Dean

In which a veteran of cultural studies seminars in the 1990s moves into academic administration and finds himself a married suburban father of two. Foucault, plus lawn care.

May 16, 2011 - 8:53pm
An occasional correspondent writes:I have to write a letter from the employer perspective to the local community college president asking that he keep open a program that supports my business, despite the relatively high cost of the program. What arguments could employers make that would make you more likely to keep an expensive program open?A history of hiring your graduates?Demonstrated demand for enrollment?Offering cash and supplies to help the program continue?Any other ideas?Oooh, I like this question.
May 15, 2011 - 9:38pm
Okay, this probably wouldn’t be it. But if I had a short list, this would be on it.I would ban the “Appeal to Authority” as a rhetorical move on campus.The “Appeal to Authority” uses the status or stature of someone who holds a position as evidence for the position. It’s fairly common in advertising, where it often takes the form of the celebrity endorsement. Logicians classify it as a fallacy, which is technically correct, but it survives anyway.
May 12, 2011 - 9:40pm
A new correspondent writes:A friend of mine works at a different college than me. She is not tenured (she is in a position that is not currently tenure-track, but may turn into one). Students have told her that the chair of her dept. has made them uncomfortable on multiple occasions--inappropriate physical contact, pressuring to sign up for his courses. My friend has tried to bring this up to the dean but apparently the dean is protective of him and refuses to do anything about it. I think students have also approached the dean about the situation.
May 11, 2011 - 9:47pm
What should a college do when the two members of a two-person department are locked in a feud?Feuds can be toxic enough in larger departments, but there, a one-on-one battle can usually be subsumed under larger numbers. Department meetings may be uncomfortable, but the program can usually remain relatively unscathed.But when the entire department is two people, drowning out the conflict just isn’t an option.
May 10, 2011 - 9:29pm
Quick -- what’s the fatal flaw of for-profit higher ed?Adjuncts? Nope -- the nonprofits invented the genre, and have carried it to extremes.Online instruction? Nope -- they don’t have a monopoly on that, either.Low standards? Nope -- they didn’t invent low standards, and some of them are as immune to the charge as are many nonprofits.Employer focus? Puh-leeze. Have you seen community colleges lately?
May 9, 2011 - 9:48pm
The Department of Education has passed a rule requiring colleges that offer online courses to be licensed in every state in which they operate, if they want students to be eligible for financial aid.This is one of those cases in which a twenty-first century technology gets cut off at the knees by a twentieth- (or eighteenth-) century political structure.
May 8, 2011 - 9:34pm
A regular correspondent writes:
May 5, 2011 - 10:44pm
- With all the technological advances of the last decade, why are we still using passwords? They’re both insecure and cumbersome. Computer geeks of the world: whoever comes up with a more elegant answer than passwords has a pile of money waiting for her. I’m just sayin’.
May 4, 2011 - 10:24pm
Every so often I get a question that’s almost a guest post. In this one, a new correspondent opens a can of worms...
May 3, 2011 - 9:21pm
I’ve followed with interest the outbreak of tornadoes in the South and Midwest, especially in Arkansas. Several colleges there have had to truncate their semesters, just because the local area was so devastated. (As far as I know, direct damage to campuses themselves was not the driving reason.) First of all, my condolences to everyone who has lost people. The sheer randomness of it all makes it hard to attach any sort of sense to it.

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