Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

April 15, 2009 - 7:40am
 
April 13, 2009 - 11:26pm
I read aloud in my classes a lot. In children’s lit, I explain that I want my students to experience the text as the child audience often does — as an oral performance. In my Victorian literature classes, I remind my students that many Victorian novels were family read-alouds, and I read short passages frequently to force us all to slow down, to pay attention to the details of scene-setting and dialogue that, reading for plot, we may skim through.
April 8, 2009 - 11:06pm
Last night a former student took over my kitchen, riffling through my cabinets, grabbing spices -- chopping, simmering, zesting, and improvising with random vegetables and the remains of an ancient bag of rice. I did buy a nice piece of steak but otherwise I took him at his word that he could make a fantastic meal out of whatever we had on hand. And he did.
April 8, 2009 - 8:55am
 
April 6, 2009 - 10:13pm
 My sixth-grade son Nick recently had to write a “reflection” piece after finishing a sixth-grade math project. It began with a sentence something like this: “I basically just scraped by at the last minute on this one.” This was the occasion for a teachable moment at home — how aware is he of his audience? What is the purpose of the reflection piece? What, in other words, did he learn?
April 2, 2009 - 10:36pm
When the Titanic sunk on April 15 of 1911, I am sure that a young couple named William and Carroll living in the Italian section of Yonkers, New York, paid little attention to the news. They were busy with caring for their newborn daughter, my grandmother. She turned ninety eight last week, and a call from my daughter to her to wish her a happy birthday (“can we go to her party?”) led me to think about her life and of a Chinese proverb that wishes “may you live in interesting times.”
April 1, 2009 - 10:05pm
  The worst-case scenario if you are a long distance parent is that a medical emergency will happen when you aren’t home to comfort and treat your injured child. This scenario happened to me, only it wasn’t my child who was injured. It was me.
April 1, 2009 - 4:27am
I remember the day it became painfully obvious to me that I was different from the other kids in school. I was 10 years old and in fifth grade. In a break from our academic activities, our teacher Mrs. Heaton suggested we play the “telephone” (or “pass it on”) game, where one person comes up with a word or phrase and whispers it to the next person, who whispers it to the next, and so on, until the last person has to repeat the word which has inevitably changed to something silly.
March 30, 2009 - 10:03pm
 
March 26, 2009 - 8:45pm
My daughter came home the other day with words that made my Math Geek heart leap for joy. She told me that she is going to start learning “sub-crack-tion”. It seems that in the race between nature and nurture, nurture had just pulled ahead.

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