Higher Education Webinars

Mama PhD

Mothers attempting to balance parenthood and academics.

June 8, 2009 - 9:49pm
Did you hear the news? Over-parenting is over. So decree the arbiters of lifestyle trends — or, at least, Lisa Belkin, who has been writing about parenting in the New York Times for the better part of this decade.
June 8, 2009 - 8:25am
Dear Susan,Seven years ago I started graduate school, a year after I had gotten married and moved to a brand new city. I commuted 85 miles each way daily (for most semesters) for three years. I loved my program and poured myself into it. My last year of PhD course work, I got pregnant, due the following July. But that summer also ended up including a 1200-mile move to another part of the country and our baby coming a month early and being born profoundly deaf.
June 4, 2009 - 9:54pm
When I entered graduate school, I once proudly proclaimed to someone I had just met that “I don’t want to be normal”. I have no idea what they must have thought of that statement, or of me, but it was basically true. I saw myself as changing the world, as saving the world from its economic messes with my little equations. Who wanted to settle for “normal” when they could go down in the history books?
June 3, 2009 - 9:40pm
They’re killing doctors. That’s what I thought in October, 1998 when I heard that Dr. Barnett Slepian had been gunned down in his home (in front of his family, no less) in a suburb of Buffalo, NY by an anti-abortion activist.This week, when I heard the news of Dr. George Tiller’s murder, I felt a similar sense of sick disbelief.
June 3, 2009 - 5:49am
A lot of my memory of college is a blur now, but a few things I stand out in my mind with great clarity. One such clear memory is a moment in a first-year orientation meeting, probably held one of the first days I arrived at the school. From among the descriptions of programs, facilities, people, opportunities came one message loud and clear from a faculty member: “You are all meant to be here,” she told us. “We are completely sure.
June 1, 2009 - 9:19pm
Last week Inside Higher Ed reported on an intriguing paper by Dahlia K. Remler and Elda Pema, a professor of public affairs and economics, respectively, that began to try to analyze the reasons professors engage in research “at the expense of teaching time.” In the report, titled “The Mystery of Faculty Priorities,” Scott Jaschik listed some of Remler and Pema’s preliminary conclusions, while also noting that the paper’s main contribution is to point out how understudied the issue is.
May 31, 2009 - 6:53pm
Hello,It’s still early for me, as I have no baby prospects and I'm nowhere close to finishing my PhD. But I'm a 28-year old female, halfway through my PhD, who feels a little bit isolated in an academic department that seems full of men who 'have it all' and a) very, very few women who have succeeded in landing a tenure-track position, and b) even less who have succeeded in doing so with children.
May 28, 2009 - 10:45pm
In the midst of parenting and teaching, we don’t often get to see the results of our labors. Last weekend, I got a glimpse of the results of my work, and found myself at one point in tears. I attended the wedding of a former student, and got to sit at a table with two other former students and their spouses. I must admit, they turned out quite well.
May 27, 2009 - 10:53pm
The two-income family is one area in which I received no helpful advice while growing up. I was born in the mid-1960s, raised by a stay-at-home mom and working dad, watched The Brady Bunch on TV and discovered feminism in college. I have always wanted a career, a family, and a house (one, not two...) and never really thought about the time, the money or the hours in the day necessary to make it all work.
May 21, 2009 - 9:16pm
Recently, our college president spoke to the faculty. In her speech to us, she said that some economists think that the economy may NEVER recover from the current recession. Scary words, even when heard by an economist. I must admit, however, that I am not so pessimistic about our current recession.I look at our current recession, and although I am certainly not a macroeconomist, I recognize in it the “Paradox of Thrift”. This idea says that when people increase their saving, this, while good for individuals, it is bad for the economy.

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