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September 21, 2010 - 11:19pm
A thoughtful reader forwarded me a link to his blog post, in which he sets out a few, fairly narrow conditions under which he considers it appropriate for administrators to “tackle the faculty.” They are:--When you have a legal obligation or a mandate from further up the administrative food chain. "I know you don't like it, folks, but we have to do it."
September 21, 2010 - 11:00pm
Health care and education are the defining issues of our time. These industries share a common set of challenges around costs, access, and quality. We have the world's greatest hospitals and colleges, doctors and professors - and people from around the world continue to look to our health care and academic institutions for leadership and innovation. People working in these two sectors also share a common realization that we cannot go into the future as we have proceeded in the past. We need to find ways to bend the cost curves for health care costs and tuition.
September 21, 2010 - 10:45pm
Winnipeg, Canada I work and attend a commuter University. It’s in the heart of downtown, and in Winnipeg, downtown is not a thriving social hub. People don’t want to stay downtown after dark, nor do they tend to choose it as a place to socialize. For the most part, the campus community scurries back to their suburban neighbourhoods at the end of the day, and does their studying and socializing in those areas.
September 21, 2010 - 10:37pm
At a recent birthday party one of my daughter’s friends received a copy of the young readers edition of the book “The Omnivore’s Dilemma” by Michael Pollan. The dust jacket describes the book as “an unforgettable journey behind the scenes of your dinner”. My daughter was intrigued. It is a very readable narrative, and since she found it in the library a last week, she has carried it around constantly.
September 21, 2010 - 6:45pm
Editors' note: if you are exploring GlobalHigherEd today please be aware that we've loaded up two entries today regarding the world university rankings issue. These entries are designed to be complementary, though they clearly operate at different levels. Our sincere thanks to Pablo Achard of the University of Geneva for his very thoughtful guest entry ('Rankings: a case of blurry pictures of the academic landscape?').
September 21, 2010 - 4:15pm
One doesn't grow up wanting to be a college president. Firefighter, yes. Doctor, certainly. But college president? Even the principal's kid wouldn't have thought of it. But here I am, starting out my first academic year at Alma College, a liberal arts college I've known and admired for years. For colleges and universities, presidential transitions offer a great opportunity to answer lingering questions about identity, to determine aspirations, to recall core values.
September 21, 2010 - 1:12pm
Editors' note: this guest entry has been kindly contributed by Pablo Achard (University of Geneva).
September 20, 2010 - 10:10pm
Should professors with full-time positions at college A be allowed to teach as adjuncts at college B?
September 20, 2010 - 9:47pm
This past Sunday the New York Times magazine section was devoted to education, and especially to education and technology.
September 20, 2010 - 9:00pm
In 2006, a new way of charging university students for tuition was introduced in England (Scotland did something different). Universities were allowed to charge undergraduates fees up to £3000 a year (since uprated to about £3300), a significant increase on the previous level, but now the government would pay the fee to the university on the student's behalf, recovering it from the student through the tax system once she or he was earning a sum somewhat below the national median income.

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