Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

April 20, 2012

With state funds in short supply, public and private higher education leaders in Iowa are sparring. The Des Moines Register reported that private college leaders were upset when Craig Lang, president of the Iowa Board of Regents, drew attention to the funds going to private college students in the state through a program not open to those at public institutions. He said that the money didn't go to "our public universities, which the people of Iowa own.” Gary Steinke, president of the Iowa Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, responded by saying: "If that was a shot across the bow, and it certainly seemed to be to me, I think that's selfish."

April 20, 2012

Albert Lord, the CEO of Sallie Mae, told industry analysts Thursday that he does not believe reports suggesting a bubble ahead for student loans, Bloomberg reported. "We don’t see anything of any evidence close to a bubble," Lord said. "This country underwent a significant financial crisis in our very recent past. It’s not really a surprise that many see bubbles around every corner." Sallie Mae expects to originate $3.2 billion in education loans this year.

April 20, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeffrey Burks of the University of Notre Dame explains the rationale behind the practice known as mark to market accounting. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

April 19, 2012

The office of the chancellor of the California Community College has announced that its review of two-tiered tuition at community colleges in the state has found that the practice would be illegal. The office has been studying the issue since Santa Monica College announced a plan -- since abandoned -- to charge more for some high-demand courses. The chancellor's office consulted with the state attorney general's office on the issue, but a spokeswoman for the chancellor's office said that no formal opinion was requested or provided. But she said that, based on the review and the consultations, the chancellor's office is "comfortable" feeling that two-tiered tuition "is not permissible and is therefore illegal" under California's education code.

April 19, 2012

Two University of Michigan graduate research assistants have filed a lawsuit against the state over a new law that bars graduate research assistants from unionizing, The Detroit Free Press reported. Republican lawmakers pushed through the legislation just as organizers appeared on the cusp of winning the right to form a union. The suit charges that the law violates the U.S. Constitution's equal protection requirements by creating a special class of workers (graduate research assistants) who are denied rights available to other workers.

April 19, 2012

Annette M. Spicuzza has announced plans to retire as police chief at the University of California at Davis, The Sacramento Bee reported. Spicuzza has been criticized for the use of pepper spray on seated, peaceful students at a protest in November. In an e-mail message, she said: "As the university does not want this incident to be its defining moment, nor do I wish for it to be mine. I believe in order to start the healing process, this chapter of my life must be closed."

 

April 19, 2012

Rudy Fichtenbaum, an economics professor at Wright State University, will be the new president of the American Association of University Professors, the organization announced late Wednesday. Fichtenbaum won 2,246 votes in the AAUP elections, nearly 1,000 votes more than Irene Mulvey, a professor of mathematics at Fairfield University, who was also competing for the post. “The current crisis calls on us to shift our focus and place our highest priority on organizing to defend our profession and genuinely reform higher education,” Fichtenbaum said in an e-mail statement after the results were announced. He has served as president of the AAUP’s Ohio Conference and has been a member of the organization’s National Council.

April 19, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Mehnaz Afridi of Manhattan College explains how many Islamic communities resisted Nazi efforts during the Holocaust. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

April 19, 2012

Franklin & Marshall College officials said Wednesday that the liberal arts college had fired its women's lacrosse coach in the wake of an investigation into a hazing complaint, Bloomberg reported. Franklin & Marshall officials said that they had dismissed Lauren Paul, whose team won a Division III national championship in 2009, and suspended a group of junior and senior players for conducting the hazing incident last year. “We make student athletes aware that there is a zero-tolerance policy against any form of hazing, and our coaches are responsible both for conveying and stewarding this policy,” Cass Cliatt, the college's spokeswoman, said in an e-mail to Bloomberg. “Not only is hazing a violation of our rules of conduct, it is against state law, and we cannot allow any activity in which students endanger themselves or others.”

April 18, 2012

Complete College America today released a report that diagnoses the failure of the current national approach to remedial education. The study, which includes self-reported data from 31 states, found that students who place into remediation are unlikely to eventually earn a degree or even complete associated college-level courses. Across all sectors, the report found that 30 percent of students who complete remediation don't even attempt credit-bearing "gateway" courses within two years.

Among the fixes proposed by the group, which is at the forefront of the college completion movement, is the report's recommendation that states and colleges end traditional remediation and instead use "co-requisite models." Under this approach, colleges place remedial students into "redesigned first-year, full-credit courses with co-requisite built-in support, just-in-time tutoring, self-paced computer labs with required attendance and the like."

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