Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, March 26, 2010 - 3:00am

Tarleton State University has rebuffed critics demanding that it halt a student production of "Corpus Christi," a play in which Jesus is depicted as gay. But the Associated Press reported that the university is moving the performance time -- originally 4 p.m. Saturday afternoon -- to 8 a.m. Saturday. In addition, only invited guests and relatives of cast members will be permitted to attend.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

The Kansas House of Representatives voted Wednesday to allow anyone in the state with a license to carry a concealed weapon to bring the weapon on campuses, KCTV News reported. The measure, which now moves to the Senate, has been opposed by higher education leaders, who say it would make campuses more dangerous and that they should be allowed to continue to ban concealed weapons.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of South Carolina could soon lose its only black board member, and with black legislators unhappy about the prospect, they are warning black football recruits to reconsider enrolling, The Associated Press reported. "We are asking young athletes to be aware ... there are folks in this state who say it's fine to play ball but not be on the governing board," the chair of the Legislative Black Caucus told the AP. Steve Spurrier, the football coach, declined to talk about the controversy.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

Shaw University has received a $31 million loan to help stabilize its finances, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. While the loan is welcome news for supporters of the historically black college, the institution is facing questions from alumni about whether board members are giving enough money or are making good on past pledges.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

Some faculty members at Canada's University of Regina are objecting to a scholarship program -- being embraced by most colleges in the country -- for the children of dead soldiers, CBC News reported. Faculty critics say that they don't object to helping these students, but singling them out -- when there are others whose parents have died or who face hardships -- glorifies war.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

Ursinus College has become the latest to make the SAT optional for applicants. Officials cited evidence that the grades in and rigor of high school courses are the best predictors of college success, and concerns about the correlation between SAT scores and family income.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

Mark G. Yudof, president of the University of California, said Wednesday that he would like to see all of the University of California campuses adopt "holistic" review of applicants, the Los Angeles Times reported. Under holistic review, personal characteristics -- such as overcoming poverty -- are considered, in addition to more traditional measures such as grades and test scores. Currently the broader review is used at the system's Berkeley and Los Angeles campuses, but Yudof said he hoped all of the campuses would adopt it. His comments came as system leaders apologized for a series of racial incidents at the San Diego and other campuses. At San Diego, only 1.6 percent of students are black.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Cincinnati largely shut down in the wake of the Kent State University killings in 1970, and when many students left the area, they missed out on their graduation ceremony. Now, the Associated Press reported, the university is welcoming back to campus those who missed the graduation and offering a special ceremony for them prior to this year's graduation.

Thursday, March 25, 2010 - 3:00am

The legislation that Congress passed last winter to stimulate the economy ratcheted up federal spending on research and development in the 2009 fiscal year, the National Science Foundation said in a report Wednesday. The NSF said that total federal R&D spending rose by 12.2 percent in 2009, to $157 billion from $140 billion in 2008. Virtually all of the increase came in non-defense spending, with most of the gain coming in health-related research and in general science research.

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday sided with a borrower whose student loans were discharged in bankruptcy without his having proven that the payments were an "undue hardship" on him, as bankruptcy law typically requires. In its unanimous, narrow ruling in the unusual case, United Student Aid Funds v. Espinosa, the court found that a bankruptcy judge was wrong to have released Francisco Espinosa from his debt without ensuring that he met the undue hardship requirement -- but that the guarantee agency seeking to collect the loans was given a chance to object, and did not in due time.

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