Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 4, 2013

Scholars and others are protesting a forthcoming journal, Porn Studies, from Routledge. "While we agree that pornography and porn culture demand and deserve more critical attention, as a group of academics, activists, anti-violence experts, health professionals, and educators, we are deeply concerned about the journal’s intention and focus and about its editorial board, which is uniformly pro-porn," says a petition signed by hundreds. "Routledge is in a position of authority, and framing the editorial 'experts' on porn as pro-porn under the auspices of neutrality (which is what the journal title does) further fosters the normalization of porn and misrepresents the academic, political and ideological debates about the issue."

Times Higher Education asked editors of the journal about their reaction to the criticism, and the editors responded that they had been "especially pleased to have so many messages from academics welcoming the journal" and "delighted that we have been able to include the foremost scholars in this area on our board, and we are continuing to invite others so that we have a really good spread of academics across disciplines."

June 4, 2013

Gordon Gee, president of Ohio State University, who has been facing criticism over disparaging remarks he made about Roman Catholics and others, has withdrawn from a planned graduation speech at a Catholic high school, The Columbus Dispatch reported. A university spokeswoman said that “it's a very important, very seminal moment for the young people and so he really wanted to ensure that the appropriate focus was kept on the young people who are graduating and their families."

June 4, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Dorothy Peteet of Columbia University reveals what the Hudson River has to say about the climate of the past. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 3, 2013

Canadian universities have been seeing steady growth in international enrollments, but only minimal interest from Americans, many of whom could potentially save a lot of money and (for those in some Northern states) enroll at institutions very close to home. An article in The Globe and Mail describes new efforts by some Canadian universities seeking to attract more American students. Special scholarships and increased marketing efforts are being tried by several universities.

June 3, 2013

Saint Paul's College, a historically black institution in Virginia founded in 1888, will close at the end of this month. While college officials did not respond to reports over the weekend of an imminent closure, the Associated Press reported that the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools confirmed that it had been formally notified by the college of plans to close. The college has been in danger of closure since SACS announced a year ago that it was stripping the college of accreditation, making its students ineligible for federal aid. There had been some hope that the college would be rescued by merging with Saint Augustine's College, a historically black college in North Carolina. Both institutions were Both founded by the Episcopal Church. But last month, Saint Augustine's announced that it did not consider that plan viable.

 

June 3, 2013

Tenure-track faculty members at the City University of New York have voted overwhelmingly that they have no confidence in Pathways, a controversial curricular shift in the CUNY system designed to make it easier for students at its community colleges to transfer to four-year colleges and in two additional years earn bachelor's degrees. More than 60 percent of eligible voters participated in the no confidence vote, and 92 percent of those voted no confidence. While the goal of smooth transfer from community colleges to four-year colleges is one that is generally endorsed by faculty members and administrators alike, many professors have spoken out against the way this is being done. Some have complained about specific changes in requirements, while others have questioned whether too much control of curricular matters has shifted away from department and college faculties. "It should be clear now, if it was not before, that CUNY should not move forward with Pathways. A 92 percent vote of no confidence is a mandate for change," said a statement issued Saturday by Barbara Bowen, president of the Professional Staff Congress, the faculty union, which organized the vote.

CUNY officials have defended Pathways as a needed reform to help more students earn bachelor's degrees. The system maintains a webpage with information about the program here.

While a number of adjunct leaders at CUNY have spoken out against Pathways, some have also criticized the vote of no confidence for excluding their participation.

 

 

June 3, 2013

The University of Chicago and the Marine Biological Laboratory, in Woods Hole, Mass., are moving toward a partnership that would involve substantial collaboration but keep the laboratory a freestanding institution. The laboratory's corporation -- largely made up of scientists who currently or formerly used the facilities there -- voted to endorse the move this weekend, and that sets the stage for negotiations over a formal agreement between the boards of the two institutions. The laboratory has been looking for an affiliation that might give it a more stable financial basis, and the University of Chicago has a history of working with laboratories (such as Argonne National Laboratory) that are closely affiliated but not owned by the university. Currently much of the activity at the laboratory takes place in the summer and one possibility for a collaboration is more support that would allow for a full program of teaching and research year-round.

June 3, 2013

American Commercial Colleges, a for-profit higher education business in Texas, has agreed to pay the federal government up to $2.5 million to settle claims that it falsely certified that it was in compliance with certain requirements to receive federal student aid. A statement on the settlement from the Justice Department said that American Commercial Colleges had "orchestrated certain short-term private student loans" that the college repaid in order to appear to comply with the "90/10" rule. That rule requires that colleges seeking to participate in federal student aid programs receive at least 10 percent of their revenues from sources other than federal student aid. H. Grady Terrill, a lawyer for American Commercial Colleges, told The Lubbock Avalanche-Journal that he anticipated the institutions soon reapplying for authority to operate.

June 3, 2013

Washington University in St. Louis has agreed to stop using cats in medical training, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The university has used cats to teach medical students how to place a tube in an infant's throat. Animal-rights groups have been focusing on Washington University, saying that most other medical schools have replaced the use of cats with mannequins. The former television host Bob Barker, a longtime animal rights advocate, in April said he would pay for the mannequins if the university would stop using cats.

June 3, 2013

Some groups of Roman Catholics regularly criticize Catholic colleges and universities for not being (in the views of these groups) Catholic enough. And plenty of bishops have from time to time criticized certain commencement speakers or campus events. But in what may be a new tactic, William Peter Blatty, best known as author of the novel and film The Exorcist, on Friday filed a complaint against Georgetown University with Cardinal Donald Wuerl, who oversees the archdiocese of Washington. In the complaint, Blatty charges that Georgetown is so insufficiently Catholic that the cardinal should either force changes or force the institution to stop calling itself Catholic. The complaint has not been released, but is 198 pages and 124 "witness statements." The Cardinal Newman Society, which pushes Catholic colleges to closely adhere to what it considers to be Catholic teachings, also supplied a 120-page "dossier" on Georgetown, also not released. In a statement, Blatty said that Georgetown has become a "Potemkin village" of Catholicism.

A spokeswoman for Georgetown said that the institution has not seen the complaint and so can't comment. But Georgetown officials -- when faced with similar criticisms in the past -- have noted that Georgetown has masses every day (up to seven on Sunday) and a wide range of programs that reflect the university's Catholic and Jesuit identity.

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