Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

Research that will be published today in the journal Health Affairs suggests that graduates of foreign medical schools perform as well as graduates of medical schools in the United States, as measured by mortality rates for patients with a common set of conditions. The findings could be significant given a growing debate over the quality of medical care provided by doctors who were educated outside the United States -- a group that makes up nearly 25 percent of physicians in the United States. At the same time, however, the study found that the performance of foreign medical graduates who were U.S. citizens lagged the performance of other graduates, the kind of figure that could add to scrutiny of colleges outside the United States that serve many American students.

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Georgia wins top honors this year as a "party school," according to The Princeton Review's annual rankings. While the college guide in which the rankings appear has many categories (and the student surveys that go into the methodology don't reflect cutting edge social science standards, to put it mildly), everyone pays attention to the party school category. A spokesman for the university issued a statement: “UGA has been on the Party School list for a while, but it’s one we prefer not to lead.... The University of Georgia takes student alcohol education programs very seriously and will continue to do so."

Another institution that makes the list went on the offensive. Bruce Benson, president of the University of Colorado, sent local reporters a memo questioning whether enough students are sampled to make valid judgments. "This blatant lack of transparency, combined with questionable research methods, causes us to question the veracity of the survey," Benson wrote in the letter to The Daily Camera. "Frankly, we would not allow our faculty researchers or our students to be so secretive in their research methods." Colorado's flagship campus at Boulder is #16 for party schools, but also earned #6 in the "reefer madness" category for pot use and #13 for hard liquor. Benson's defense may have backfired. The alt-weekly Denver Westword awarded Benson its "Schmuck of the Week" award for trying to trash the rankings. Wrote the newspaper: "Sorry, Bruce, but CU is one of the country's top party schools, and everyone knows it. That orgasm of cannabis consumption in Boulder every 4/20 isn't exactly a secret. Now, you may not be proud of that, but by bitching about how unfair the school's slotting is before we even know the actual number, you seem like you're protesting too much, not to mention giving the CU faithful several extra days to anticipate a list they probably had forgotten was even coming."

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

Wagner College has ended a requirement that all applicants submit either SAT or ACT scores. “We believe that the best predictor of a student’s potential to succeed at Wagner is the student’s high school transcript,” said Angelo Araimo, vice president for enrollment and planning, in a statement.

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

An article in Business Week looks at why some universities (a small minority in fact) select CEOs, not academics, to lead business schools. "That kind of narrow and bounded perception of what deans do has changed really dramatically, so now in many places there is really a heightened expectation that the dean should be the public face of the school," Dan King, executive director of the American Association of University Administrators, told the magazine. "Business schools, in particular, want to present a prestigious public face. One way of presenting that image is showing they can recruit a leader who has been a successful executive in business and industry."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

A new California law requires public colleges and universities to let students from foster care -- who frequently have no place to go during the summers -- to have access to dormitories year-round, the Los Angeles Times reported. About 700 University of California students came from the foster care system, as did 1,200 at California State University campuses and several thousand at community colleges.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Friday admitted that it tracked Howard Zinn, the noted historian and political activist who died in January, from 1949 to 1974, and the bureau released 423 pages of records from the monitoring of Zinn. Salon noted that this monitoring took place "despite having apparently no evidence that he ever committed a crime." And TPM noted that the records indicate that a senior official at Boston University, where Zinn taught, tried to have him fired in 1970. (If you are wondering if that official might have been John Silber, the long-time BU president with whom Zinn had many disagreements, it wasn't, as Silber hadn't been hired at the time.)

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

Some University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center faculty members have been letting medical residents operate at a public hospital with less supervision and training than is standard and generally seen as necessary, The Dallas Morning News reported. While UT officials denied wrongdoing, the article cited the resignation of one faculty member in protest, and concerns expressed by other faculty members and various warnings in consultants' reports. The faculty member who quit said that the hospital had become "clinical fodder."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has brought civil charges against Samuel Wyly and Charles Wyly, two brothers, for securities fraud. While the SEC is accusing them of hundreds of millions of dollars in gains through insider trading, one charge relates to the University of Michigan. AnnArbor.com reported that Samuel Wyly's $10 million gift in 1997 came from cash he gained through securities fraud. A lawyer for the brothers has denied wrongdoing. A spokeswoman for the university said: "Mr. Wyly has been a long-time friend and supporter of the university. We're sorry to hear he is facing these difficult circumstances."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

William Pollard is drawing mixed reviews in his first year as president of Medgar Evers College. The New York Times reported that some faculty members and leaders of the City University of New York praise his efforts, but some of his changes are angering others at the college. One dispute involves the Center for NuLeadership on Urban Solutions, which works with former prisoners. The new administration is asking a series of questions about the program, suggesting a lack of confidence that it is a national think tank. Further, administrators have angered supporters of the center by hesitating to endorse a plan to bring 300 nonviolent drug offenders to campus over the next three years, the Times reported.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

Stevens Institute of Technology appears to be moving past last year's administrative and financial turmoil, in part due to reforms pushed by New Jersey's attorney general, The Star-Ledger reported. The president whose compensation levels were criticized has stepped down and the board has instituted a series of new rules designed to assure proper oversight and greater transparency.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top