Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

May 21, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Mary-Ann Pouls Wegner of the University of Toronto reveals some recent finds from an archaeological excavation in Abydos, Egypt. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

May 21, 2012

Of those graduating with new M.B.A.s this year, 62 percent report that they had a job offer, according to a survey being released today by the Graduate Management Admission Council. That represents an increase from 54 percent last year. The most popular industries in which M.B.A. graduates looked for jobs were products and services, consulting and finance/accounting. The products and services sector yielded the fewest job offers, but also saw the highest increase in salary from pre-degree to post-degree earnings (75 percent).

May 21, 2012

The Netherlands is lifting special protection it provided for a university course in Frisian, Dutch News reported. Frisian is an official language of the country, spoken by about half of the 350,000 people who live in the province of Friesland. Currently 15 students are studying the language at Groningen University in a course that has been until now exempt from requirements that would have eliminated the program for lack of a higher enrollment level.

 

May 21, 2012

Groups representing English-language training programs for international students are objecting to a new federal interpretation requiring separate accreditation both for free-standing programs and those affiliated with colleges and universities that have their own accreditation. The Department of Homeland Security is interpreting a new law to require both types of institutions to have their own accreditation. But a joint statement from the American Association of Intensive English Programs and University and College Intensive English Programs asks for clarification to specify that programs that are part of an accredited college or university should not need separate accreditation. Accreditors review such programs, the statement says, and other federal laws recognize this accreditation.

 

May 21, 2012

E-mail records obtained by The Missoulian suggest that Jim Foley, vice president of the University of Montana, asked the then-dean of students if there was a way to punish the victim of an alleged rape for speaking out about the incident. “Is it not a violation of the student code of conduct for the woman to be publicly talking about the process and providing details about the conclusion?” Foley asked in an e-mail obtained through an open-records request. In another e-mail to the then-dean of students, Foley expressed dismay that an alleged incident involving four football players and a woman was being described in the press as a "gang rape." (University officials had been using the term "date rape.") The dean responded that the term "gang rape" was being used "because that is what it was." The U.S. Department of Justice is investigating how the university has handled a series of sexual assault allegations. Foley did not respond to requests from the newspaper for comments on the e-mail messages.

 

May 18, 2012

Angelo Armenti Jr.  was fired Wednesday as president of California University of Pennsylvania, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The Board of Governors of the state higher education system fired Armenti after he declined to resign. Officials have been studying spending accounts related to the university, but declined to discuss details on why Armenti was fired. He had been president since 1992.

May 18, 2012

The parents of two Chinese students at the University of Southern California who were shot and killed while in a parked car near the campus have sued the university, charging it misled them about safety issues, The Los Angeles Times reported. The suit says that the university incorrectly claims on its website that it is "ranked among the safest of U.S. universities and colleges, with one of the most comprehensive, proactive campus and community safety programs in the nation." After the two were murdered last month, the university continued to provide "clearly misleading" information on safety, the suit says. A lawyer for the university said that the institution is "deeply saddened by this tragic event, which was a random violent act not representative of the safety of USC or the neighborhoods around campus. While we have deep sympathy for the victims' families, this lawsuit is baseless and we will move to have it dismissed."

May 18, 2012

Employees of the eight universities of the Ivy League have donated $375,932 to President Obama's re-election campaign, and $60,465 to the campaign of his Republican opponent, Mitt Romney, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics, Bloomberg Businessweek reported. One unit of one university -- Harvard Business School -- has employees who give more to Romney than Obama ($14,000 to $11,400).

May 18, 2012

Harold Raveché, the former president of Stevens Institute of Technology, has received more than $5 million since he quit under fire for alleged financial mismanagement, The Star-Ledger reported. University officials said that they were legally obligated to pay the money, which came in the form of consulting fees, severance pay, retirement benefits and other cash.

May 18, 2012

Latino students are likelier than students from other racial groups to be deterred from enrolling in graduate school because of debt, says a report from the Center for Urban Education at the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education. The report argues that reducing undergraduate debt is essential to increasing the number of Latino students who pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics.

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