Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 11, 2012

Employees at University of Nebraska campuses will be able to sign up their domestic partners for health benefits, following a 5-to-3 vote Friday by the university's Board of Regents, The Lincoln Journal Star reported. University administrators said that extending partner benefits was the right thing to do, and was needed to recruit top faculty members. They noted that all of the other Big 10 institutions (of which Nebraska is a new member) have such policies. Critics accused the university of undermining the institution of marriage.

 

June 11, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Amy Guo of Newcastle University explains the development of technology to address issues faced by aging drivers. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 11, 2012

The Press-Enterprise describes an awkward situation recently at a high school in Riverside, California when the winner was announced for a scholarship for black students. The winner was white. The student had applied for every possible scholarship, and the application form said only that black students were "encouraged to apply," without any statement that the funds were only for black students. In fact, as materials sent to the high school indicated, the scholarship was only for black students. The original winner returned the funds.

 

June 11, 2012

The New York Times Company is closing down the Knowledge Network, its five-year-old venture into online learning, a company spokeswoman said on Friday.  The Times announced the venture with much fanfare in 2007, believing that the esteem with which it is held in higher education and especially the depth of its content would give it a leg up in the increasingly crowded distance education market (and, like many newspaper companies, hoping to generate new lines of revenue as its traditional businesses sagged). The company established partnerships with a relatively small number of colleges and other organizations to offer courses jointly as well as offering its own, but the business apparently did not take off.  

"I can confirm that after July 31, Knowledge Network courses will no longer be available online," said Linda Zebian, manager of corporate communications at the Times Company. "We’re examining our education businesses to see how we will structure them in the future to best serve readers and others who are interested in learning with The New York Times."

June 8, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Damian Cruse of the University of Western Ontario shares his research into the level of conscious awareness among coma patients. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 8, 2012

Veterans' affairs and financial aid officers hoping for a clearer understanding of the requirements of an Obama administration executive order on recruiting of veterans and service members were left wanting (and frustrated) Thursday when many were shut out of the first of several webinars at which federal agency officials planned to explain the new policies. The executive order, announced in April on a visit by President Obama to a Georgia military base, will force colleges to disclose more information about financial aid and graduation rates, as well as requiring the Department of Defense to set rules for recruiting at military installations, among other things. Listservs were ablaze Thursday afternoon with complaints from the many who had been shut out as well as from those who participated, who said most of their questions went unanswered.

Officials of the Defense, Veterans Affairs, and Education agencies apologized for the "computer glitch" that allowed more than 1,000 participants to sign up for webinar that was limited to 1,000 spaces, and scheduled a third event for next week.

June 8, 2012

Data released Thursday are likely to add to scrutiny of law schools and the question of whether applicants are being admitted who are unlikely to find career advancement worth the cost. The overall employment rate for those who graduated law school in 2011 is 85.6 percent, the lowest since 1994, according to a report issued Thursday by NALP: The Association for Legal Career Professionals. But that figure, association officials noted, doesn't reflect just how bad the job market is. Only 65.4 percent of new law grads are employed in jobs for which bar passage is required. That figure is down 9 percentage points since 2008 -- and is consistent with the reports of many law graduates that they are landing jobs for which they didn't need to go to law school (many times taking out loans to do so).

James Leipold, executive director of NALP, wrote in the report that "for members of the Class of 2011, caught as they were in the worst of the recession, entering law school in the fall of 2008 just as Lehman Brothers collapsed ... the entry-level job market can only be described as brutal. When this class took their LSATs and applied for law school there were no signs that the legal economic boom was showing any signs of slowing, and yet by the time they graduated they faced what was arguably the worst entry-level legal employment market in more than 30 years."

June 8, 2012

California's community colleges need a stronger central office, more authority for local governing boards and less decision-making power for academic senates, according to new report by a council of business and civic leaders from the state and California Competes, a nonprofit group headed by Bob Shireman, a former U.S. Department of Education official. The proposed governance changes were part of a broader range of recommendations on how to keep public higher education strong in California amid a deepening budget crisis. The report also called for a new Higher Education Investment Board, which would oversee coordination and promote efficiency across the three public systems in the state, while also absorbing the functions of the California Student Aid Commission.

June 8, 2012

Pasadena City College announced Thursday that it has placed two senior officials -- Richard Van Pelt, vice president of administrative services, and Alfred Hutchings, facilities services supervisor -- on administrative leave, pending the results of a bribery-related investigation by the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, The Los Angeles Times reported. The D.A.'s office executed search warrants at the officials' homes and offices Thursday, in an investigations of alleged solicitation of bribes involving a contract from the college. No charges have been filed and the officials could not be reached for comment.

 

June 8, 2012

The board of Florida A&M University voted 8-4 Thursday that it lacks confidence in James Ammons, the university's president, The Orlando Sentinel reported. Ammons has faced much criticism for failing to deal with widespread hazing by the university's band -- hazing that has received considerable attention since the death of a student last year. But questions have also been raised about other issues, including the university's fragile finances and audits suggesting inadequate management controls. Ammons vowed at the board meeting that he would improve. "I hear you loudly and clearly," Ammons said before the vote. " I understand there are some measures I have to take as president of this university to fix things and I'm going to fix them. This is very serious. This is very serious for the future of this university and you have my commitment to fix them and get this job done." The board did not vote to suspend or fire him.

Pages

Back to Top