Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

December 12, 2011

The Texas Association of Business is paying for billboard advertising that focuses on low graduation rates at community colleges, calling out institutions by name, The Texas Tribune reported. The first billboard ad ran in Austin and said of Austin Community College: "4% OF ACC STUDENTS GRADUATE IN 3 YEARS. IS THAT A GOOD USE OF TAX $? TX ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS." A new ad is focused on the community college district in Dallas.

Richard Rhodes, president of Austin Community College, said that the business group was using an inappropriate measure. He noted that only about 5.5 percent of the college's students are measured in the federal calculation of graduation rates. "People really have to understand the metrics and the data behind the metrics," Rhodes said in a college podcast. "There's a much larger story when we think about community college students and what their intent is and why they come here."

December 12, 2011

In today’s Academic Minute, Robin Bell of Columbia University explains the strange behavior of water beneath the glaciers of Antarctica. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.


 
December 12, 2011

A panel of Division I college presidents has recommended that the National Collegiate Athletic Association cut the number of football scholarships in the top competitive level to 80 from 85, restrict the number of non-coaching staff members in some sports, and bar foreign tours by teams during the summer months, all to save money. The recommendations of the Resource Allocation Working Group, one of several panels appointed by President Mark Emmert to consider significant changes in NCAA rules, are to be voted on by the Division I Board of Directors at next month's NCAA convention. The panel is also proposing that the number of scholarships awarded at any time in Division I women's basketball be reduced to 13 from 15, and that the number of grants awarded by Football Championship Series teams drop to 60 from the current 63.

December 9, 2011

Larry Sager has been scheduled to step down of the law school of the University of Texas at Austin at the end of this academic year. But The Austin American-Statesman reported that he was forced to resign Thursday, following complaints from faculty members about the allocation of funds. The disagreements centered on the use of funds from the law school's foundation.

December 9, 2011

Sara Jayne Steen, the president of Plymouth State University, sent an e-mail to students telling them they could skip classes today if they wanted to stay off campus to avoid a pro-gun protest, the Associated Press reported. Opponents of the university's gun ban have vowed to hold a protest today, and to attend the protest with loaded guns. The university plans to enforce its ban.

December 9, 2011

In today’s Academic Minute, Hollis Seamon of the College of Saint Rose explains the modern resurgence of fairy tales as a literary genre.  Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

December 9, 2011

The YU Beacon, an online student publication at Yeshiva University, has lost its university funding in the wake of a controversy over a first-person sex article by an anonymous student at the Stern College for Women, the undergraduate women's division at Yeshiva. The article, "How Do I Even Begin to Explain This," is an account of "[p]eeling off my Stern-girl exterior" and meeting a man (who normally wears a yarmulke) for sex at a hotel. The essay is tame by the standards of college newspaper sex columns, but was a shock at Yeshiva. Many of the student comments are negative. One such comment: "That story was extremely disturbing, and it too exemplified ideas that are completely contrary to the Torah. The reason this article has generated more controversy is simply because pseudoerotica has more fans than murder descriptions." Others were more sympathetic, with one student writing that "I thought this article had a lot of merit because it touched on a serious issue that exists in the modern orthodox community in general and the YU/Stern community in particular: the schism between what our educators view as reality and the reality that exists for our generation."

The home page of the Beacon announces that, in the wake of the article, "YU and The Beacon have agreed to separate." Fox News quoted a Yeshiva spokesman as saying that the student government, and not the university, made the decision to cut off funds.

December 9, 2011

The board of Florida A&M University voted Thursday to reprimand James Ammons, the president, in the wake of the hazing death of a student in the institution's marching band, the Associated Press reported. Board members also complained that Ammons had not kept them informed or dealt with the accreditation problems facing some academic programs. When the AP asked Ammons after the meeting if he had "dodged a bullet," he said "I heard the bullet loudly and clearly."

 

December 9, 2011

Virginia Tech, where the tragedy of shooting deaths is known too well, again experienced that trauma on Thursday afternoon. Students and others were encouraged to stay wherever they were -- with activities called off -- after a police officer was shot at a routine traffic stop. Reports followed of another dead body and of a search for the killer. By the end of the afternoon, news reports said that the second body was the shooter, and the university said that normal activities could resume. Final exams that had been scheduled for today have been postponed for a day.

Late Thursday, Virginia Tech identified the police officer who was killed: Deriek W. Crouse, 39, who with his wife was raising five children and step-children. He was an Army veteran who had worked for the university since 2007.

 

December 9, 2011

An article in Science explores how some Saudi universities are building their research reputations in nontraditional ways. King Abdulaziz University has hired more than 60 top researchers in the sciences, at nice salaries for part-time work, if they agree to list the university with their other institutions in identification lines in journal articles. The idea is that rankings of citations will show a sharp increase for the university. King Saud University is working to recruit researchers to affiliate in loose ways so that their discoveries will be linked to the university. Some academics quoted in the article said that they feared such efforts would detract from the real advances being made by Saudi universities.

Pages

Back to Top