Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 4:20am

James F. Jones Jr. announced Monday that he will retire next year -- a year earlier than planned -- as president of Trinity College in Connecticut, The Hartford Courant reported. Jones has been under sustained criticism from many alumni since last year, when he announced that all fraternities and sororities would be forced to become coeducational. College officials characterized the retirement decision as unrelated to the Greek uproar, but the Courant reported that many alumni critics are dubious, given the extent of anger over the Greek decision.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 3:00am

University of Southern California students are alleging that the more than 70 Los Angeles Police Department officers who responded to a noise complaint and broke up a house party early Sunday morning engaged in racial profiling, The Daily Trojan reported. While police came in with riot gear and batons, those students said, a large house party attended primarily by white students remained undisturbed. Police say some of the 400-or-so students – most of whom were black or Latino, and six of whom were arrested – became aggressive and threw bottles at them, which students denied. One student who attended the celebratory graduation party posted a petition afterward titled “Stop Racial Profiling at USC!”, which had gathered nearly 2,000 signatures as of early Monday evening. The television station KTLA reported that LAPD will investigate the allegation internally.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013 - 3:00am

Syracuse University has decided to leave the Big East Conference for the Atlantic Coast Conference, which has large payout for members. But Syracuse is bound by its contract with the Big East to pay a $7.5 million exit fee. The university is planning to allocate that bill across the institution, arguing that all parts will benefit from the eventual greater revenues from the ACC. But The Syracuse Post-Standard reported that both student and faculty groups are asking why the athletics department shouldn't pay the $7.5 million, and spare other departments cuts. A petition says: "In light of the fact that the Athletic Department is expected to receive an annual increase from the ACC in excess of $10 million per year, we endorse the resolution of the University Senate and Senate Budget Committee recommending that the $7.5 million Big East exit fee be paid fully by the Athletic Department and not out of student tuition."

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 3:00am

Japan is planning to offer scholarships for students at its universities to study abroad, The New York Times reported. The move is aimed to reverse a decline in the number of Japanese students who go abroad, and to make the country more competitive economically.

 

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 3:00am

Alumni of Pennsylvania State University, who elect some members of the university's board, voted to unseat two incumbents, The Centre Daily Times reported. The three candidates elected (one seat was empty) were all backed by Penn Staters for Responsible Stewardship, a group formed by alumni who were angry over the dismissal of the late Joe Paterno as head football coach amid the Jerry Sandusky scandal. The results were announced as the Penn State board, consistent with the recommendations of an independent review, announced a series of changes in board structure, including the removal of the university president and state governor as voting members of the board, shrinking the size of the board, and creating a process for the removal of trustees.

 

 

 

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 4:21am

When Richard Herman resigned as chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (amid a scandal over admissions procedures that favored politically connected applicants), he was awarded a salary of $212,000 a year as he took on a faculty position. But an article in The Chicago Tribune raises questions about whether he is performing the full duties of a faculty member. Herman is required to teach only two classes a year in the College of Education, not the standard four a year. And his class this semester was called off due to low enrollment -- the second time that has happened since 2011, the Tribune said. Herman lives in Chicago and said through a university spokesman that he travels to campus once a week. Herman has switched to online courses when his classes have been canceled. He declined to comment on the questions raised by the article.

 

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 3:00am

Niall Ferguson, the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University, on Saturday released an apology for comments he made about John Maynard Keynes. Ferguson said that Keynes didn't care about future generations because he was gay and did not have children. In a statement posted on his blog, Ferguson said that his comments were off-the-cuff and "as stupid as they were insensitive." Ferguson elaborated: "First, it is obvious that people who do not have children also care about future generations. Second, I had forgotten that Keynes’s wife Lydia miscarried. My disagreements with Keynes’s economic philosophy have never had anything to do with his sexual orientation. It is simply false to suggest, as I did, that his approach to economic policy was inspired by any aspect of his personal life. As those who know me and my work are well aware, I detest all prejudice, sexual or otherwise."

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 4:23am

Students and faculty members say that security officials at Providence College regularly engage in racial profiling, the Associated Press reported. Black and Latino students say that they are followed by campus security and required to produce identification in situations in which white students don't face similar demands. A college spokesman said that Providence has "moved swiftly" to deal with the concerns, and is requiring security staff members to go through "cultural competency" training.

 

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 3:00am

Throughout the economic downturn, some pundits and politicians have suggested that there is limited value to a college degree. An analysis in The New York Times, based on the latest unemployment data, suggests otherwise. The Times noted that in April, when the national unemployment rate was 7.5 percent, the rate for college graduates was 3.9 percent. Further, the number of college-educated graduates with jobs is now up 9.1 percent since the recession started. The number of those with a high school diploma, but no college degree, who have jobs is down 9 percent.

 

Monday, May 6, 2013 - 6:41am

Adjunct faculty members at Georgetown University voted late last week to unionize, becoming the third major group in the Washington area to join a burgeoning citywide organizing effort by the Service Employees International Union. Nearly three-quarters of the eligible faculty members who voted supported the union. Georgetown officials said they would support the decision of the adjunct faculty members to unionize.

Adjuncts at George Washington and American Universities are already part of the citywide bargaining unit, SEIU Local 500.

 

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