Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Five University of Southern Mississippi students have been stripped of their pep band scholarships, kicked out of the band and ordered into a cultural sensitivity class for chanting "Where's your green card?" at an opposing basketball player from Puerto Rico. Caught on camera during the second round of the National College Athletic Association men's basketball tournament last week, the band members implied that Kansas State University freshman Angel Rodriguez was in the United States illegally. Rodriguez was born in San Juan, making him an American citizen.

University officials announced the punishment in a news release Tuesday. “The students have been forthcoming, cooperative, contrite and sincerely remorseful," said Joe Paul, Southern Mississippi's vice president for student affairs. "They acted rashly and inappropriately, and now see the gravity of their words and actions. This is a teachable moment, not only for these students but for our entire student body and those who work with them.”

The university issued a swift apology last week, and its athletic director met with Rodriguez in K-State's team hotel. Rodriguez, 19, accepted the apology.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, John Williams-Searle of the College of Saint Rose explains the origin of our understanding of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in the 19th-century diagnosis, Railway Spine. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Science leaders in Japan are warning that the country's universities are facing a shortage of young research talent, Nature reported. In the last 30 years, the number of science faculty members at state universities has grown from 50,000 to 63,000, but the number under the age of 35 has dropped from 10,000 to 6,800. Tight budgets have forced universities to limit hiring, leading to concerns about the future of science programs that aren't recruiting enough new professors.

 

 

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Health-care costs associated with college students' blackouts reach hundreds of thousands of dollars at large universities, according to new research in the journal Health Affairs. The study analyzed the patterns of student drinking at five universities and found that blackout-related medical problems included broken bones, head and brain injuries, and other serious problems. Based on the research, the study estimates that large universities (with more than 40,000 students) could send enough students to hospitals for blackout-related medical care to incur costs of $469,000 to $546,000 each per year. The study's authors are Marlon P. Mundt and Larissa I. Zakletskaia, both of the department of family medicine at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012 - 3:00am

Paul H. Frampton, a physicist who holds an endowed chair at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is in an Argentine jail facing cocaine charges, and he is fighting both those charges and the university's decision to suspend his salary, The News & Observer of Raleigh reported. Frampton said that the cocaine was planted in his luggage, and that he is confident he will be able to show that in court. But he said he needs his salary paid, and is frustrated that it was cut off. Frampton said that Provost Bruce Carney blocked his pay out of professional jealousy. A university spokeswoman declined to say why Frampton's pay was suspended, but university officials have noted that he is not teaching as scheduled. But Frampton said he has continued to work 40-plus hours a week in prison, and has been advising his graduate students from afar (one of his advisees confirmed this).

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Meng Zhu of Johns Hopkins University reveals the link between the strength claims on product packaging and the frequency of use after purchase. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 - 3:00am

The California State University System will close enrollment on most of its campuses for the spring 2013 semester, eliminating spots for about 16,000 would-be students, because of budget cuts imposed by the state, system officials said Monday. The statements by Robert Turnage, the system's assistant vice chancellor for budget, came in a call with reporters in advance of a trustee meeting later this week. Turnage told reporters that the system would limit enrollment next spring to all but a few hundred students who quality for transfer to one of eight campuses under a recent state law. (The campuses are Channel Islands, Chico, East Bay, Fullerton, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Bernardino and Sonoma.)

The number of students whose enrollment is blocked could rise to 25,000 in the 2013-14 academic year, Turnage said, depending on the outcome of November ballot measures that seek to raise taxes to supplement the state budget. 

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 - 3:00am

Felice Nudelman, executive director of education for The New York Times Company, was named Monday as the next chancellor of Antioch University. In her current position, Nudelman has worked to promote numerous education initiatives, including the offering of courses and the creation of educational materials and technology tools. At Antioch, she will lead a system of five geographically dispersed campuses and distance programs. Antioch College -- the undergraduate residential institution -- is now independent of the university system.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 - 3:00am

The Modern Language Association's Executive Council has issued a statement calling on doctoral programs in English to required "advanced competence" in at least one language beyond English, and to provide support for graduate students who want to study languages beyond any requirements. Most doctoral programs in English require reading proficiency in one non-English language, but the new statement suggests a higher bar may be in order.

"Those who pursue a Ph.D. in English are engaged in deep study of a language and its literary and cultural expressions," the statement says. "Most likely they will teach works in translation during their career. Knowledge of several languages and the process of language learning offer more than research tools enabling students to read primary and secondary materials in their original form. They promote consciousness of and sensitivity to both the multilingual contexts in which anglophone literatures are written and the work of translation in which contemporary writers and readers engage on a daily basis. Proficiency in more than one language promotes the cultural literacy essential to teaching in the global university of the future."

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 - 3:00am

India is expanding its ties to Russian universities, and helping to create programs at those institutions to study India, The Hindu reported. India has just signed an agreement to create a Center of Indian Studies at Kazan Federal University, the first such India-backed institute in Russia outside of Moscow. Plans are currently under way for either chairs or research centers related to India at universities in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Vladivostok and Krasnodar.

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