Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Tablet ownership is increasing among college students and high school seniors, according to a survey released by the Pearson Foundation. Among college students, ownership is now 25 percent, up from 7 percent a year ago. Among high school seniors, the figure is now 17 percent, up from 4 percent. A majority of college students (63 percent) and high school seniors (69 percent) believe that tablets will effectively replace textbooks within five years. The survey was conducted in January by Harris Interactive. More than 1,200 college students and 200 college-bound high school seniors responded.

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 3:00am

A team of lawyers continued their barrage of legal actions challenging the accuracy and legitimacy of law school placement rates, threatening class actions against 20 more schools. David Anziska, the lawyer leading the group, said that the 20 schools -- like the 14 previously sued -- had misrepresented their post-graduate employment rates. He also warned that "at the end of this process, nearly every law school in the country will be sued.” The schools cited in this round include some more-visible names than the prior targets. The 20 schools are American University Washington College of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Catholic University of America's Columbus School of Law, Chapman University School of Law, Loyola Marymount University Law School, Loyola University Chicago School of Law, New England School of Law, Pace University School of Law, Pepperdine University School of Law, Roger Williams University School of Law, St. Louis University School of Law, St. John’s University School of Law, Seattle University School of Law, Stetson University College of Law, Syracuse University College of Law, University of Miami School of Law; University of St. Thomas School of Law, Valparaiso University School of Law, Western New England University School of Law, and Whittier Law School.

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 3:00am

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered Chicago State University to reinstate a former adviser to its student newspaper that the institution fired in 2008 in the wake of a series of critical articles, the Student Press Law Center reported. The judge's decision sided with Gerian Steven Moore, ruling that the public university had violated his First Amendment rights and ordering him to be reinstated to his job as executive director for communications or a similar position. The decision did not go entirely for the plaintiffs, however, as the court ruled against the newspaper's former editor, who had sought action against the former administrators who helped bring about the demise of the Tempo, the student newspaper at the time.
 

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 3:00am

Colorado's attorney general on Wednesday announced a $4.5 million settlement with Westwood College Inc., over allegations that the for-profit higher education provider engaged in deceptive business practices. Westwood will pay $2 million to the state and credit $2.5 million toward restitution for students who used the college's tuition financing plan. The state's complaint had alleged that Westwood inflated its job placement rates and misled prospective students about the average wages of graduates, transferability of course credits and the total cost of Westwood degrees. It also alleged that the college failed to disclose the terms of its student financing program.

Westwood made no admission of liability as part of the settlement. In 2009 the college agreed to a $7 million settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice related to a complaint about filing false claims for federal student aid. It is also the subject of an investigation by the Illinois attorney general. Sen. Tom Harkin, an Iowa Democrat, on Wednesday called for the college's accreditors and federal agencies to "immediately review whether the school has the sufficient institutional integrity and academic quality to continue receiving taxpayer-funded financial aid."

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Governor Rick Snyder of Michigan on Tuesday signed legislation that classifies research assistants at public universities as students who are ineligible for collective bargaining, The Detroit Free Press reported. Republican legislators and the Republican governor enacted the legislation amid a move to unionize research assistants at the University of Michigan. Union supporters and Democrats have blasted the legislation.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 3:00am

A sit-in at the German University in Cairo has entered its third week, Ahram Online reported. Students are demanding protection of their rights to dissent, following the expulsion of two students and the suspension of two others over earlier protests. Those students were protesting actions by Egypt's rulers. The university told them, in advance of the protest, that they could have a silent protest, but punished some students after they shouted their views during the demonstration.

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 3:00am

The Education Department will track the number of students completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and release the data to the public, sorted by high school,  the department announced Tuesday. The website, which lists the number of students per high school who have completed and submitted the form, is intended to help high school counselors (and others) and uses data from the Education Department's systems, the first time such data has been made available. The numbers will be updated every two weeks.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Advocacy groups, including Campus Progress, US PIRG, Rebuild the Dream and other student groups, delivered 130,000 letters from students to Congress on Wednesday, asking the lawmakers to stop the interest rate on subsidized student loans from doubling to 6.8 percent in July. President Obama has urged Congress to stop the rate increase, and Congressional Democrats have called for the change as well. Keeping the interest rate for subsidized loans at 3.4 percent would cost about $5 billion.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 4:50am

The board of Santa Monica College has approved a plan to charge a much higher price for certain courses, typically to students who enroll for them after the two-year institution has filled its allotment of state-funded courses, the Los Angeles Times reported. Under the plan, the college would create a nonprofit foundation that would charge as much as $200 a unit for high-demand courses such as English and math, compared to the standard rate of $36 (which is due to rise to $46 this summer).

College officials said they believed the program was on solid legal ground, but critics express the concern that such an approach amounts to privatizing public higher education, and a spokesman for the California Community College chancellor's office told the Times the plan did not appear to comply with state education codes.

 

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Robert J. Birgeneau announced Tuesday that he will retire as chancellor of the University of California at Berkeley at the end of 2012. He was appointed in 2004, and said that he originally hoped to lead the campus for seven years, but opted to stay due to the severe budget pressure the university has faced. Birgeneau has faced student criticism over budget cuts, and what many students believe was excessive force in dealing with protests. But he also pushed hard through private fund-raising to protect Berkeley from raids on its faculty talent.

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