Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, March 19, 2012 - 4:24am

Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, is pushing a series of controversial reforms of higher education, The New York Times reported. He has added test-based admissions at the public universities and has issued evaluations that many fear could be used to shut down some private institutions, which he has termed "garage universities."

 

Monday, March 19, 2012 - 3:00am

More than 100 top faculty members at the University of Illinois sent a new letter to the Board of Trustees seeking the dismissal of Michael Hogan as president of the university system, The News-Gazette reported. Faculty anger has been growing in recent months against Hogan, who following a meeting at which board members urged him to repair faculty relations said he would do so, and apologized for the breakdown. But a new letter suggests that the faculty leaders have not been impressed by the new efforts by Hogan. While the faculty leaders thanked the board for taking their earlier concerns seriously, they added in their new letter that it was time for a new president. It is "all the more urgent that action be taken quickly to preserve the credibility of the board in the public arena as well as internally amongst the faculty, staff and students of the university," the letter said. "A board that does not act when there is a president who is so ethically and reputationally compromised as to be unable to function is one that is, in truth, itself unable to effectively govern the institution that it stewards."

Monday, March 19, 2012 - 3:00am

U.S. News & World Report has announced that two professional schools have notified it that they provided some inaccurate information in the data collected for the magazine's latest rankings. Without providing details, the magazine said that the University of St. Thomas law school provided incorrect information about job placement and that the University of Houston education school provided incorrect information about research expenditures. St. Thomas posted information about the error. The law school said that it reported law school job placement rates at time of graduation in two places on its form -- one correct (32.9 percent) and one incorrect (80.6 percent), and that the magazine used the incorrect figure.I have e-mail out to UH to find out what it's error was -sj

Monday, March 19, 2012 - 3:00am

Spike TV has a new reality show, "American Digger," that debuts this week and anthropologists are not likely to be fans. The show is described this way in its press materials: "This new unscripted original series follows former professional wrestler turned modern day relic hunter Ric Savage, as he and his team from American Savage target areas such as battlefields and historic sites in the hopes of striking it rich and capitalizing on unearthing and selling bits of American history. The only thing standing in their way are the homeowners themselves, who Savage must convince to allow them to dig up their property using state-of-the-art metal detectors and heavy-duty excavation equipment. What artifacts they find, they sell for a substantial profit, but not before negotiating a deal to divide the revenue with the property owners."

The American Anthropological Association has sent a letter to Spike TV calling on it to withdraw or change the show. Association members are "deeply disturbed" about the show, the letter says, because its message seems to be that "it is okay to loot and destroy archaeological sites for monetary gain." The letter goes on to say that the show "will undermine critical public support for the protection, preservation and interpretation of the archaeological record."

 

Monday, March 19, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, J. Nicholas Laneman of the University of Notre Dame explains the technology behind the expanding use of wireless networks. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, March 19, 2012 - 3:00am

Jewish students, faculty members and organizations are angry at the State University of New York for changing its academic calendar so that Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur will no longer be holidays and spring break will no longer be scheduled to overlap with Passover and Easter, The Jewish Week reported. Charles Robbins, vice provost for undergraduate education, told the newspaper that the idea was to treat all religious groups the same (not offering any holidays as university holidays), while encouraging faculty members and others to be flexible with those whose observances require them to miss some classes. "We are trying to be respectful of all religions," Robbins said. "We want to be equally welcoming to everybody."

Rabbi Joseph Topek of the Stony Brook Hillel has posted on his blog a critique of the new calendar, the adoption of which he wrote is in contrast to a long history of support at Stony Brook for students of many faiths. "We are very concerned that this policy will result in large numbers of faculty and staff being unable to teach classes on major holidays and large numbers of students will miss important course work," he wrote. "New York State Education Law (Section 224-a) requires the institution to provide all students with an equivalent make up opportunity for any required work missed due to religious observance. We all know, however, that the student-teacher relationship is not an equal one, and many students are intimidated or frightened by the prospect of revealing personal information to a teacher in order to ask for make up work."

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 3:59am

Students and other experts on spring break (bartenders in spring break locales) report that students have become tamer, even "prudish" while on the vacations once known for every kind of excess, The New York Times reported. The reason? With video cameras everywhere, students fear that their exploits will be posted online in ways that will embarrass them. One piece of evidence for this trend: Only one bar in Key West is featuring a wet T-shirt contest, and it takes place only once a week.

 

 

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 3:00am

State and local funding for higher education remained almost constant in 2011, according to a State Higher Education Executive Officers Association study released today.

Instead of the marked decreases in state and local support for colleges seen the previous two years, overall funding saw a slight uptick from $87.2 billion in 2010 to $87.5 billion in 2011.

But that’s not cause for celebration, said Andrew Carlson, the association’s policy analyst. For one, that number is still considerably lower than the $88.8 billion awarded to colleges in 2008. And even though overall funding remained basically steady last year, enrollment grew. Having more students on campus means fewer government dollars per student and an increased reliance on tuition to pay university bills.

Nationally, state and local funding per full-time student fell $242 last year while net tuition revenue per full-time student increased $225. That exaggerates a long-term trend in which tuition went from supporting 23.2 percent of educational revenues in 1986 to 43.3 percent last year.

Complicating matters, Carlson said, is that next year’s numbers are projected to be worse. Enrollment is again expected to grow, while state funding dropped.

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 3:00am

Smith College will be the chief academic planning partner with a group creating a women's university in Malaysia, tentatively called the Asian Women's Leadership University. The new institution is being founded as a nonprofit by three Smith alumnae. Starting in 1916, Smith supported a then young women's institution in China, Ginling College.

Friday, March 16, 2012 - 3:00am

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is pushing a plan to merge Rutgers University at Camden into Rowan University, a plan that is hitting opposition from some on both campuses who see their missions as distinct. One talking point for supporters of the plan has been that SAT averages of Rowan are higher than those of the Camden campus, part of the state's flagship university. It turns out they aren't. The Record reported that Rowan's figures excluded the scores of disadvantaged students. When they are included (as Rutgers does and as colleges are generally required to do by those who make SAT score comparisons), Camden's SAT average is higher than that of Rowan.

 

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