Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 14, 2012

Today Inside Higher Ed introduces a new feature: a monthly contest in which we ask readers to suggest a caption for our higher ed-themed cartoons, drawn by Matthew Henry Hall. The first cartoon is here, as are the rules. We encourage your participation -- there are opportunities not just to propose pithy and clever captions yourself, but to endorse (and eventually vote on) those you like. And the contest winner will receive a signed version of the cartoon and a $100 gift certificate to Amazon.

We welcome your participation -- click here to have at it.

September 14, 2012

As participation in higher education worldwide rises and geographic barriers and boundaries fall, collaboration on some postsecondary issues has increased. But most countries and regions still operate independently on many fronts, both purposefully (because countries want to go their own way) and less so, because of inadequate communication and cooperation. That fragmentation can be particularly vexing in areas such as quality assurance, and it is a major reason for a new endeavor announced Thursday by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

Through the new CHEA International Quality Group, the council -- which represents American colleges and universities that are accredited by agencies that it recognizes -- aims to bring together colleges, accreditors, quality assurance agencies and associations from around the world to work together on dealing with quality-related issues in higher education. CHEA itself has been active in international matters, setting aside part of its annual meeting for an international forum and working with entities such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and UNESCO on issues such as diploma mills.

But Judith S. Eaton, CHEA's president, said council officials believed that the "growth in worldwide activity of our institutions, through study abroad and branch campuses, and the expanding international activity of U.S. accreditors" -- as well as the explosion of issues such as cross-border education, for-profit higher education, and massive open online courses -- made this a logical time to expand its involvement. The council does not plan either to accredit institutions or to recognize international quality assurance agencies as it does U.S. accreditors.

"We're trying to create a forum in which we and our partners around the world can work together on quality assurance issues," she said. The new entity, which will be part of CHEA, plans to convene discussions, conduct research, share news and best practices, and provide consulting services on quality assurance issues.

September 14, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Larisa DeSantis of Vanderbilt University explains the evolutionary strategy that allowed mammals to survive multiple shifts in the Earth’s climate. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

September 14, 2012

Pepperdine University has denied the request of a student for academic credit for an internship with the Marijuana Policy Project, which encourages states to liberalize medical marijuana laws and to decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot. The project issued a press release criticizing the decision and saying that it was inconsistent with Pepperdine's Christian values. "Many prominent religious leaders and organizations support marijuana policy reform, along the spectrum of medical marijuana, decriminalization, and taxation and regulation. Seemingly, the Christian message is, or should be, one of mercy, humanity, and stopping the nation’s failed war on marijuana users," said the statement. A spokesman for Pepperdine said that the student was free on her own time to work with the group, but that the university reviews requests for academic credit to be awarded for internships. In this case, he said, officials "determined that the mission of Pepperdine didn't align well enough with the organization she applied to for the internship."

 

September 14, 2012

Eleven current and former women's volleyball team members at the State University of New York at Geneseo have been arrested on charges of hazing and unlawfully dealing with a minor, The Livingston County News reported. According to authorities, eight younger members of the team were handcuffed, blindfolded and forced to drink vodka. One of the eight had to be hospitalized for alcohol poisoning. A statement from the university said that all games and practices have been called off while the investigation continues.

 

September 14, 2012

The University of California at Los Angeles announced Thursday that it was ordering an end to plans by a labor education center at the university to help create a certificate program for undocumented students. A statement from the university said the following: "UCLA has determined that the agreement between the UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education and the National Labor College (NLC), which resulted in the creation of the National Dream University certificate program, was negotiated without the necessary approvals from UCLA’s academic and administrative leadership. As a result, the agreement has been declared void and UCLA has directed the Labor Center to suspend all work on National Dream University. While these actions do not preclude any future relationships between the center and National Labor College, any agreements would require a comprehensive academic and financial plan that has approval from appropriate parties. It is important to remember that the envisioned certificate program would have been offered through the National Labor College and not UCLA; news reports suggesting that those enrolled in the program would be UCLA students are completely inaccurate."

 


 

September 14, 2012

The University of California Board of Regents on Thursday agreed to settle a suit by 21 students at the Davis campus who were pepper sprayed while they were engaged in a non-violent protest last year, The Los Angeles Times reported. University officials, as well as the lawyers for the students, declined to discuss details of the settlement. Leslie Tang Schilling, a member of the board, said the regents settled the case so they could focus on serious budget issues. Of what happened at Davis, she said that "it was a really unfortunate incident."

September 13, 2012

Concordia University-St. Paul announced Wednesday that it was dropping its undergraduate tuition and fees by a third for next year, joining a handful of institutions including the University of the South and the University of Charleston to cut their sticker price in the face of increased price sensitivity in the market. The sticker price for tuition and fees, currently set at $29,700, will be $19,700 next fall for all students, including those currently enrolled.

Administrators at Concordia said they were becoming concerned that students their traditional demographic -- middle- and lower-income students in Minnesota -- were ruling out Concordia as an option based on its price, despite the fact that after aid few students actually ended up paying that much. According to federal data, 99 percent of students at Concordia received some form of institutional aid.

Much of the student population at Concordia currently pays less than the new sticker price. The college's discount rate was 48 percent, meaning that students paid just over 50 percent of the sticker price on average. Concordia administrators said some revenue is likely to be lost by lowering the price, but that they hope to offset that by increasing enrollment.

September 13, 2012

Last fall, Occupy Student Debt, an activist group, called on students to stop paying their student loan bills as a form of protest. Now another group has called for burning those bills on Sept. 22, promising a 20-foot high "ceremonial fire" in Hollywood. Hard Block, a group that supports the goals of the Occupy movement and describes itself as a "developer and enabler of the burgeoning protest culture," has organized the event and says that an "elected official" will dump the ashes of the student loan bills on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives.

It's unclear how successful the protest will be: Occupy Student Debt promised that students would stop repaying their bills if 1 million students signed on. So far, just over 4,000 have.

September 13, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Richard Lankau of the University of Georgia reveals how some native plants are responding to an ecological shift caused by invasive species. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

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