Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Buffalo State College's Dwight Hennessy reveals that while cultures around the globe may be drastically different, the psychology of driving often transcends cultural divides. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

Kent State University, facing deep budget cuts, has limited enrollments in American Sign Language courses to those students who need the language for their majors or minors, The Ravenna Record Courier reported. Students say that the limits are discriminatory because non-majors are still permitted in introductory Spanish and other languages. But officials say that sections of those languages have been cut as well, and that there is no money for more ASL sections.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

A University of Iowa investigation has concluded that a “strenuous squat lifting workout” was the primary cause of 13 Hawkeye football players being hospitalized with rhabdomyolysis, a rare muscle disorder, in January. Findings from the investigation were presented by President Sally Mason at a Board of Regents meeting Wednesday; the report further noted that the hospitalized football players “were in no way responsible for their own injuries,” “did nothing wrong” and “did not take banned substances or engage in other risky behaviors.” The investigation also found that coaches were neither “negligent” nor “reckless” when they “planned, conducted, or supervised the strenuous workouts” that resulted in the hospitalization of the 13 players and that “unforeseen developments [occurred] without the fault of anyone involved.”

At a news conference Wednesday, Coach Kirk Ferentz said: “We have learned a little bit more about [rhabdomyolysis]. Quite frankly, I don't think anybody in this building knew much about it prior to this occurrence. We've learned a little bit more about that, but I still think there's a lot to be learned from what I know. One thing about our sports medicine department, I think they'll take this as an opportunity to learn more. The one thing we have learned, we won't do that exercise again, pretty clear at this point, until we know more.”

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The Organization of American Historians has adopted new standards for the employment of non-tenure-track faculty members, calling for departments to provide them with "clearly stated evaluation procedures," seniority benefits in hiring and pay, health insurance and other benefits, including access to funds for conference travel. On adjunct e-mail lists on Wednesday, the new standards were praised by some, but criticized by others as being too weak and not addressing larger inequities between those on and off the tenure track.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

Ohio University's president has turned down a journalism professor's appeal of an ethics finding against him, even though a Faculty Senate committee found "troubling irregularities" in the work of a campus committee that initially reported the ethics finding. The decision by President Roderick McDavis is the latest development in the convoluted case of Bill Reader, with whom McDavis sided last year in a bitter dispute over Reader's tenure case. That battle spawned an ethics inquiry into whether Reader engaged in nonviolent threats of retaliation following the tenure vote, and the communications college's ethics panel recommended that he be reprimanded. Last month, though, the Faculty Senate's Professional Relations Committee voted 6-0, with one abstention, to dismiss the ethics violations against Reader, citing procedural problems in the ethics panel's work. In a terse statement Monday, McDavis rejected the faculty panel's conclusions and backed the ethics committee's findings.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Department of Justice has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit in which for-profit colleges challenged the legality of three rules the Education Department has promulgated to tighten regulation of federal student aid. The lawsuit, filed in January by the Association for Private Sector Colleges and Universities, asks the courts to invalidate three of the dozen-plus new rules that the Education Department issued in October; the disputed regulations relate to state authorization of colleges, incentive compensation for recruiters, and misrepresentation of colleges' programs and results. In their brief asking for dismissal of the lawsuit, government lawyers argued that the Education Department was well within its legal authority under the Higher Education Act in promulgating all three rules. The New America Foundation's Higher Ed Watch blog first reported the government's response.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:00am

Canadian higher education leaders on Tuesday praised their federal government's budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year, which, unlike those put forward by its counterparts in the United States and Britain, would significantly increase spending on higher education and research. The 2011 budget would spend tens of millions of new dollars to create research chairs and invest in brain research, and provide additional funds for student financial aid and study abroad. "[T]oday’s budgetary commitments to higher education are in line with a growing consensus among Canadians that Canada’s research universities play an integral role in advancing our economy and improving the social and economic well-being of all Canadians,” said Stephen Toope, president of the University of British Columbia. “These investments are all the more notable when we are seeing significant budgetary cuts to higher education sectors in other countries."

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:00am

Students at the University of Arizona are debating a barbed-wire fence installed across a major campus area by a group that wants to protest the way the movement of immigrants is restricted, KGUN 9 News reported. Organizers said that the detours students were forced to take could prompt needed conversations about immigration issues. Some students said that they were annoyed by the inconvenience.

Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:00am
  • Annual Conference, National Association of Graduate Admissions Professionals, April 6-9, Washington, D.C.
  • 2011 Annual Meeting, American Educational Research Association, April 8-12, New Orleans.
  • A Dream Deferred: The Future of African American Education, The College Board, April 11-12, Philadelphia.
  • Annual Meeting & Exposition, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, April 13-16, Indianapolis.
  • Annual Conference, Western Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, April 17-19, Honolulu.
  • Department and Division Chair Workshop, Council of Independent Colleges, May 17-19, Baltimore, Md.
  • 51st Annual Forum, Association for Institutional Research, May 21-25, Toronto, Ont.
  • These meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar on The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education. This listing will appear as a regular feature in this space.

    To submit a listing, click here.

    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 - 3:00am

    The American Bar Association has been engaged in a long process of updating accreditation standards for law schools, and the latest draft features tougher reporting requirements on job placement, The National Law Journal reported. Under the new draft, law schools would disclose the percentage of students whose employment status is unknown after nine months, the percentage in jobs funded by the law school, the percentage in jobs requiring passage of a bar exam and the percentage in non-legal jobs. The inclusion of those changes reflects criticisms of current, minimalist reporting requirements that critics say hide the extent of unemployment of law school graduates. The new draft also maintains controversial provisions from earlier versions that would eliminate requirements that law schools have tenure systems and use the LSAT in admissions.

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