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May 5, 2010 - 9:41pm
Let us engage in a thought experiment. You are teaching a course, and you want your students to participate in an online discussion/debate around some materials. The content that you want your students to discuss and debate is the PBS Frontline episode, "College Inc." that aired May 4th. The online discussion that you want your students to participate in is the one kicked off by Dean Dad -
May 5, 2010 - 9:46am
So, I'm sitting in my chair, drinking my first cup of coffee this morning and checking my email, when it starts.Mmmmmrrrrrrrrwwwwwwwooooo! Mmmmmrrrrrwwwwooooowwwwoowwww!Damn tomcat's around again. The good news, I guess, is that he's coming around in the daytime. Last summer, it was at night. All night. With the windows open, he came through loud and clear. Or so I thought at the time.Mmmrrrwwooowww! Mmrrooww? Mmrrrup!
May 5, 2010 - 4:41am
Last night "Frontline" did a show on for-profit higher education.It was a disappointing episode in many ways.
May 4, 2010 - 9:45pm
Three predictions about how changes in the curricular mediums will alter the learning process.Prediction 1: Curricular content will be consumed in shorter chunks, across more diffuse times, and in multiple places.Prediction 2: The amount of time any given individual (student) spends consuming curricular content will decrease.Prediction 3: The total amount of curricular content consumed will increase, as prior "non-students" and "student non-consumers" evolve into curricular consumers.
May 3, 2010 - 10:45pm
A cagey correspondent writes:A former colleague of my husband (at another college) tells my husband that she was just offered a tenure track position in the new department at a small public college. She tells my husband that the spouse of a colleague of her husband got her the opportunity to apply.Let's give them fake names:Yuppy: the small local public college expanding with a new departmentBigMed: public grad school with tons of money where my husband used to be research track
May 3, 2010 - 10:39pm
It feels like it's been a while since I wrote anything about being a parent in this space. It's been a busy semester at work, and I've had a lot on my mind related to teaching and advising, I suppose. It's also the case that I'm in that delightful stage of parenting that doesn't require hands-on attention every second to keep the kids alive. My daughter sends me a facebook message periodically — or, more often, just plays another round in one of our ongoing word games online — so I know she's all right.
May 3, 2010 - 8:27pm
I don't want to push my opinion too much about Cathy Davidson's grading experiments at Duke. Not that I don't have opinions, it's just that I don't have any better answers than everyone who commented on the article - as grading is a puzzle that we all struggle with. What I'd like to add are 3 ways that technology and learning technologists can assist faculty who would like to experiment as Professor Davidson has done with finding more authentic and effective ways to use grading to promote learning.
May 3, 2010 - 7:26pm
I don't want to think about the crude oil currently spewing into the Gulf of Mexico.I'd much rather think about how Tokyo is trying out a bunch of all-electric taxicabs with replaceable batteries, so the cabs don't have to sit idle for any sort of recharging cycle.Not about how the oil flow into precious waters is now estimated at five times what it previously was, which was itself five times as fast as BP's initial estimate.
May 2, 2010 - 10:46pm
After about a year of serving as Assistant Provost, the Provost called me in and indicated that he was more than pleased with my job performance and was ready, especially given the added responsibilities I had taken on, to recommend promotion to Associate Provost. I was thrilled and very appreciative and indicated as much to the Provost. He repeated that it was well deserved and then said there was one stipulation regarding the promotion. He made it clear that this wasn’t a “requirement.” However, he also made it clear that this was more than a casual suggestion.
May 2, 2010 - 10:34pm
So Nobel laureate Michael Beard assures us all of the the inevitability and consequences of global warming, in Ian McEwan's smart and hilarious new book Solar.


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