Admissions

Admissions
Sep 26, 2016
American colleges and universities can't count on ever-increasing numbers of international students, panelists warn.

Surveys

Highlights: fewer colleges meeting targets for this year, a higher bar for Asians, skepticism about new standardized writing tests and a new application, mixed feelings on Hillary Clinton’s college plan and applicants’ criminal records.

Booklets

"Recruiting International Students" is Inside Higher Ed's new print-on-demand compilation of articles.

The booklet features articles about trends, debates and strategies of a range of institutions.

The compilation is free and you may download a copy here.

Inside Higher Ed will present a free webinar on Thursday, August 27, at 2 p.m. Eastern, about the themes of the booklet.

Please click here here to register or find out more.

The publication of this booklet was made possible in part by the advertising support of ETS.

Archive

June 21, 2010

A new study may revive arguments that the average test scores of black students trail those of white students not just because of economic disadvantages, but because some parts of the test result in differential scores by race for students of equal academic prowess.

The finding -- already being questioned by the College Board -- could be extremely significant as many colleges that continue to rely on the SAT may be less comfortable doing so amid allegations that it is biased against black test-takers.

June 21, 2010

Symone Gamble, 17, of Frisco, Texas, was dead-set on attending Princeton University. Then she noticed a booklet about New York University Abu Dhabi in her stacks of college mail. Intrigued, she applied. The university flew her to Abu Dhabi for an all-expenses-paid candidate weekend. “It was the first campus I went to where I felt like I could honestly be at home, even though for a girl from a town in Texas, feeling at home in a place on the other side of the globe feels a little bit out of the ordinary,” she said.

June 18, 2010

WASHINGTON -- Six years after they were first published, the data that Anthony Carnevale and Stephen J. Rose produced showing that students from the lowest socioeconomic quartile of Americans were 25 times less likely than wealthy Americans to enroll in the most selective colleges have helped to reshape public policy around higher education.

June 16, 2010

Anastasia Megan, a 13-year-old Florida girl who has nearly completed her high-school curriculum via homeschooling, tried to take dual-enrollment courses at Lake-Sumter Community College last year. She was denied entry, however, by administrators who thought she was not ready to sit alongside older students in the classroom. The Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights is now investigating whether the decision violated anti-bias law – raising an issue that comes up at other community colleges as well.

June 15, 2010

WASHINGTON -- The United States economy is in serious danger from a growing mismatch between the skills that will be needed for jobs being created and the educational backgrounds (or lack thereof) of would-be workers. That is the conclusion of a mammoth analysis of jobs data being released today by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

June 14, 2010

The question facing universities looking to compete in the booming market for online higher education is not so much how to do it, but how to distinguish themselves from the rest.

In this, Christian universities appear to have a built-in advantage. And many are seizing the opportunity to expand their footprint.

June 7, 2010

The number of families hiring private counselors to advise them on the college application process continues to grow, with one recent study estimating that 26 percent of "high achieving" students now make use of such counselors. The field is unregulated and includes many one- or two-person operations, as well as large, slick businesses that boast about their clients' track records.

June 3, 2010

As hot higher education ideas go, the three-year bachelor's degree continues to get a lot of attention and praise. Most recently, an op-ed in The New York Times made the case for three years of undergraduate study.

June 1, 2010

In higher education, change rarely happens quickly. Not so when it comes to hiring overseas agencies -- paid by the college in the form of per-student commissions -- to recruit international students. Two years ago the topic was taboo, and few colleges would publicly admit to the practice, which is illegal under U.S. law when it comes to recruiting American students.

May 27, 2010

In 1981, Grey Poupon took the nation by storm. Although the little-known Dijon mustard had been manufactured for more than a century, in the early ’80s it went from a minor six-figure business to a retail powerhouse.

Most people remember the famous TV ad in which one Rolls-Royce pulls up next to another. An aristocratic-looking passenger rolls down the back window to ask, “Pardon me. Would you have any Grey Poupon?”

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