Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, July 20, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Department of Education is today proposing new, stricter rules on eligibility of students to receive federal financial aid to attend colleges and universities outside the United States. Some of the rules increase financial reporting requirements for the institutions seeking to have their students be eligible for the aid. Some rules are specific to foreign medical schools. One that could have an impact on many of them would raise to 75 percent from 60 percent the rate at which graduates must pass U.S. medical licensing exams for the institution's students to remain eligible for aid. A report released in June by the Government Accountability Office urged the department to toughen oversight of foreign medical schools that want their students to be eligible for U.S. student aid.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010 - 3:00am

A study has found that just over 5 percent of medical residency applications at a major academic medical center showed evidence of plagiarism. The study, which appears in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, analyzed the applications with new Turnitin software that is being sold to admissions offices to detect plagiarism. The prevalence of plagiarism was greater among applicants who were not citizens of the United States.

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

Three artists whose work was to have been displayed in an exhibit at Brandeis University in the fall have pulled permission as a protest of the university's policies on its own collection of art, The Boston Globe reported. The university originally planned to sell its noted collection of modern art, likely worth hundreds of millions of dollars. While the university -- facing widespread criticism -- put the plan on hold, it has yet to rule out sales. The three artists are Bill Viola, who works with videos, and the painters April Gornik and Eric Fischl. Gornik told the Globe: "Frankly, I had thought the whole controversy had been resolved and that the collection was safe and not in danger of being sold.... I didn’t realize there was so much possibility of it being sold. We’ve been very encouraged that the president of the university apparently stated that he doesn’t intend to sell the collection, but without some sort of legally binding evidence, we’ve decided to postpone the show.’’

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

A jury on Thursday awarded $545,000 to Trev Kiser, the former women's basketball coach at Clark College, in Washington State, who charged wrongful termination over his advocacy for female athletes, The Columbian reported. Clark's president, Bob Knight told the newspaper: “I would just have to say we are disappointed in the verdict. Clark College is reviewing our options. It would be inappropriate to comment further.” Knight was not at the college when Kiser was dismissed.

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

NBC News today announced "Education Nation," a week of events in September that will bring together leaders from politics, all levels of education and policy experts, focused on a two-day summit at Rockefeller Plaza. Attendees are expected to include U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, and Al Sharpton. University presidents who will be participating include Susan Hockfield, president of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Bill Pepicello, president of University of Phoenix. Several hundred people -- including students and parents -- are expected at the summit. Content from the summit and special stories on education issues will be featured on “NBC Nightly News,” “Today,” “Meet the Press,” “Your Business,” MSNBC, CNBC, Telemundo, msnbc.com and nbclearn.com. NBC announced that the effort is also being supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the University of Phoenix, the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, American Express, Raytheon, Tishman Speyer and Scholastic.

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

BP has been offering lucrative research contracts -- with signing bonuses -- to marine science researchers in the Gulf region, and the deals have alarmed scientists because of confidentiality clauses and restrictions on access that would be allowed to results, The Press-Register reported. In one case, the company tried to sign on the entire marine science of an Alabama university but was rebuffed over the confidentiality clauses, the newspaper said. One contract offer obtained by the Press-Register would have barred scientists from publishing their research, sharing it or speaking about data collected for at least three years. More than one scientist said that the financial offer was $250 an hour -- and the contract suggests that the work would be used for BP's legal defense. BP declined to comment.

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

The Educational Testing Service announced last week that it is suspending registrations in Iran for the Test of English as a Foreign Language. ETS cited the new sanctions against Iran adopted by the United Nations and the United States, which make it impossible for ETS to handle payments from Iran. The New York Times reported that many experts on international education are outraged by this news, given that the TOEFL is taken by Iranians who want to come study in the United States -- precisely those Iranians who may someday promote democracy in their home country. An official with the International English Language Testing System, a British-based system known by the acronym IELTS, which is a competitor to TOEFL, told Inside Higher Ed that IELTS continues to be offered in Iran.

Monday, July 19, 2010 - 3:00am

An abundance of articulation agreements doesn't assure easy transfer of credit from community colleges to four-year institutions. That's the conclusion of an article in The Indianapolis Star, which examined the situation in Indiana. Ivy Tech Community College, a statewide community college system, has 500 course-specific transfer agreements with 65 universities, the Star found, but it said that the agreements "can be confusing -- and they are not binding." Even when a university agrees to transfer credits, individual departments sometimes do not.

Friday, July 16, 2010 - 3:00am

The House of Representatives Appropriations Committee approved a 2011 spending bill Thursday that would increase funds for the National Institutes of Health by $1 billion and provide $5.7 billion to keep the maximum Pell Grant at its current level, closing an existing shortfall. Most other student aid programs would be held at their 2010 levels under the legislation, but Rep. David Obey, the Wisconsin Democrat who heads the panel, noted that the measure would provide the first significant increase in a decade in job training grants through the Workforce Investment Act.

Friday, July 16, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Texas Investment Management Company is worried enough about the state of the markets that it spent $500 million (about 3 percent of its value) on buying gold, The Houston Chronicle reported. Bruce Zimmerman, CEO of the fund, told the University of Texas Board of Regents this week that the move reflected "a lack of confidence in financial markets," adding that " I wish I could tell you the future looked rosy. Unfortunately, that's not our view. At best, we believe the future is uncertain."

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