Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Tuesday, September 21, 2010 - 3:00am

The ACT and the College Board have long noted that those who take strong college preparatory courses do better on the ACT and SAT, and in college. New research from ACT on Monday notes that when minority and low-income students take a college preparatory core, not only do they do better, but the average gaps between them and other students shrink.

Tuesday, September 21, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Education Department has awarded grants to 17 colleges in 12 states to help them create or expand campuswide emergency management plans or programs. The recipients are: Auburn University ($708,471), Case Western Reserve University ($568,090), Clark College in Washington ($744,402), College of Southern Nevada ($756,474), Colleges of the Fenway ($512,081), Cornell University ($587,684), Indiana University ($642,847), Joliet Junior College ($521,787), Milwaukee Area Technical College ($791,439), Missouri Southern State University ($401,981), Pikes Peak Community College ($476,355), Purdue University-Calumet ($486,281), Sullivan County Community College ($284,435), Tufts University ($503,138), University of St. Thomas ($245,694), University of Tennessee at Chattanooga ($499,252), and Western Washington University ($512,742).

Tuesday, September 21, 2010 - 3:00am

Ohio University has apologized to Ohio State University for an attack by the former's mascot on the latter's prior to a football face-off Saturday. The student who was the Ohio U. mascot has also been banned from any role with athletics. Video and commentary from Bucknuts show the Ohio mascot charging across the field in a first attack and then following up in the end zone.

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

Irish universities are facing a crisis related to budgets and quality as they have been forced to eliminate positions at a time of rising enrollments. Times Higher Education reported. In 2009, and again in 2010, the universities have cut their staffing levels by 3 percent a year, but over that two-year period, undergraduate enrollment is up 12 percent and graduate enrollment is up 6 percent.

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

Members of Congress who have signed letters opposing proposed tougher regulations for for-profit higher education have seen their contributions from the sector increase, according to an investigation by ProPublica. The nonprofit journalism organization found that members who signed letters opposing new rules have received $94,000 in 2010. For some of the lawmakers, this means much more money than they have received from the sector in the past. Rep. Donald Payne, a Democrat from New Jersey, received $6,000 in campaign contributions from for-profit higher ed from 2005 through 2009. In 2010, he received more than $20,000.

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees last week approved a $157,000 pay raise for Lee T. Todd Jr., the outgoing president of the university, and made the raise retroactive for a year, arguing that his salary had been too low and was more appropriately set at its new level of $511,000. Criticism has been widespread, not only of the actual raise (at a time when the university is facing budget cuts), but of comments by trustees defending the raise. An editorial in the Lexington Herald-Leader, for example, noted that one trustee said that "we do not pay the cleaning lady what we pay the heart surgeon."

One creative (and anonymous) response to the raise is on YouTube:

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

The National Association of Scholars in June released a report criticizing the selections colleges make for common reading assignments for freshmen, charging that colleges favor the multicultural and politically correct over the timeless ideals that have helped to build Western civilization. Many academics criticized the association's critique, saying that it oversimplified the book selections and didn't reflect the actual goals behind these reading programs. For instance, many colleges said that the association was correct in identifying a preference for living authors -- and that colleges leaned that way because they saw value in inviting those authors to campus to meet students. On Friday, the association released a list of 37 of its suggestions for books that would be good to use for common reading programs for freshmen. Dead white men do dominate the list -- with William Shakespeare getting three slots (for Julius Caesar, Richard III and Henry V). The association also recommends Augustine's Confessions, James Fenimore Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans, and Voltaire's Candide, not to mention classics by the likes of Plato and Plutarch. But those expecting only works by dead white men may be surprised to find books by a living white man (Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff); a living African author (Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart); a dead white woman (Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop); and authors who are very much a part of the African-American and American canons (Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God).

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

Pennsylvania State University on Friday announced its largest gift ever -- $88 million that will finance the construction of a hockey arena and the creation of a Division I men's hockey team. The university also will create a Division I women's hockey team.

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Minnesota-Twin Cities is getting a lot of questions about why it called off the scheduled broadcast premiere of a documentary, "Troubled Waters," which is about the Mississippi River and produced by the university's natural history museum, The Star Tribune reported. University officials say that they delayed the broadcast -- which was to have taken place on the Twin Cities public television station next month -- so that faculty members could review the documentary for possible issues of accuracy and balance. But those involved in the documentary say that it was fact-checked thoroughly. Parts of the documentary focus on environmental problems created by chemicals used by farms -- and that material is expected to be controversial.

Monday, September 20, 2010 - 3:00am

Many students at Purdue University are angry about the latest installment of a regular feature in The Purdue Exponent, the student newspaper, WLFI reported. The feature is a cartoon, "Sex Position of the Week," and the latest such cartoon is being viewed by many as suggesting that rape is such a position. The student journalists say they never intended to condone rape, but students who created a Facebook group called "Tell Purdue Exponent Advocating Rape is NOT OKAY" believe that's exactly what the newspaper did.

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top