Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

April 27, 2012

The vice dean of the University of Pennsylvania's graduate school of education resigned Thursday, a day after Penn officials placed him on leave amid reports that he did not actuall have the doctorate he had claimed to have, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

April 27, 2012

Northern Virginia Community College is the latest two-year institution to announce a partnership with the University of Phoenix, with the announcement yesterday of a transfer agreement. Students from the community college will get a tuition discount when they transfer to Phoenix, according to a news release. They will also be able to tap the for-profit provider's prior learning assessment offerings, which can grant college credit for prior training and work experience. President Obama, who has often been critical of for-profits, has visited Northern Virginia five times for photo ops and to give speeches. Jill Biden, the vice president's wife, is a professor at the college.

April 27, 2012

Portland State University warned students and employees on Thursday that it had suspended a graduate student and barred him from the campus after he had allegedly made "threats of violence against the PSU community," The Oregonian reported.

April 27, 2012

The Education Department just finished two rounds of negotiated rule making on financial aid issues -- one on student loan regulations and one on the rules that govern financial aid for teacher preparation programs -- but is already planning a third. The department will focus on creating new regulations to prevent fraud in financial aid programs, as well as possibly changing financial aid delivery to electronic funds transfers. The department may also "update and streamline" the rules for campus-based financial aid programs, such as Perkins Loans and Federal Work-Study, wrote David Bergeron, deputy assistant secretary for policy, planning, and innovation in the department's Office of Postsecondary Education.

Public hearings on the rule making process are scheduled for May 23 in Phoenix and May 31 in Washington, D.C.

April 27, 2012

Simplifying the Free Application for Federal Student Aid would have little effect on eligibility for need-based state grants, according to a College Board study that could allay the concerns about relying only on Internal Revenue Service data -- not a more detailed listing of a student or parent's income and assets -- when awarding financial aid. The authors of the report, "Simplifying Student Aid: What It Would Mean For States," examined the possible consequences of relying only on data transferred from the IRS, which would make filling out the complex form much less difficult for students. (Some fear that the application process itself discourages students who would qualify for need-based financial aid.)

In a sample of five states that award need-based grants, the simpler form would have little effect: the number of eligible students decreased by less than 1 percent in Kentucky and Ohio and would increase slightly in Minnesota, Texas and Vermont, the study's authors found.

April 27, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Ross Brann of Cornell University traces the similarities of Hebrew and Arabic to a time when they were considered a single language. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

April 27, 2012

Two students at the Berlin University of the Arts are offending many with an unusual project. Reuters reported that the students have built a guillotine and posted a video of themselves doing so, and are letting the public vote on whether or not to use the guillotine to kill a lamb. The video may be a stunt, as a spokeswoman for the university said that the students were not serious about killing the lamb and were only trying to create an "artistic provocation." Almost 300,000 people have voted, with a majority favoring the lamb's continued life.

 

April 27, 2012

The Kentucky Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that public colleges and universities do not have the right to bar guns in student or employee vehicles on campuses, The Louisville Courier-Journal reported. Kentucky does permit its colleges and universities to bar guns on the persons of people on campuses. But the Supreme Court said that going beyond that would be "contrary to a fundamental policy, the right to bear arms."

April 26, 2012

Twelve Native American tribes and three University of California at San Diego professors are fighting in court over the remains of two people who may have lived nearly 10,000 years ago, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported. The tribes cite federal laws that provide for the transfer of remains for traditional burials. But the professors argue that there is no evidence that the remains have a connection to the tribes, and that the remains should be preserved for research.

 

April 26, 2012

Marion Barry, the former Washington mayor who is now on the City Council, is facing criticism for comments he made at a council hearing on the budget of the University of the District of Columbia. The Washington Post reported that Barry was urging the university to train more black nurses. The controversy concerns his rationale: “[I]f you go to the hospital now, you’ll find a number of immigrants who are nurses, particularly from the Philippines,” said Barry, who has previously been faulted for comments about Asians. “And no offense, but let’s grow our own teachers, let’s grow our own nurses, and so that we don’t have to go scrounging in our community clinics and other kinds of places, having to hire people from somewhere else.” The National Federation of Filipino American Associations blasted Barry’s remarks as “racist” and “bigoted.”

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