Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

New research from the University of Bristol finds that, in Britain at least, people who own a cat are more likely than those who own dogs to have a university degree, the BBC reported. According to the study, 47.2 percent of households with a cat have at least one person with a university degree, while the figure is only 38.4 percent for those with a dog. One theory suggested for this pet gap is that the university graduates have jobs with longer working hours that may make it more difficult to care for a dog.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

A special commission to study the future of the University of California is hearing a wide range of ideas, but not all observers believe the commission is the best approach to finding the right ideas, the Los Angeles Times reported. The commission has been hearing ideas such as offering three-year undergraduate degrees, increasing the use of online education, and replacing tuition with post-graduation fees based on income. Critics, however, say that California needs a broader look at all of higher education in the state, and how it is financed.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The College Art Association is the latest academic association to report significant declines in available faculty jobs. The association's career center (which doesn't have all art faculty jobs, but which is a good tool for measuring the job market) listed 1,263 positions in the 2009 fiscal year, a decline of 28 percent from the year before. Studio art positions declined by 31 percent and art history positions by 14 percent -- with the first six months of the 2010 fiscal year showing further shrinkage of the academic job market.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Gay students and supporters at John Carroll University staged a sit-in on the basketball court prior to the start of a game last week to protest the university's refusal to add sexual orientation to the official anti-bias policy at the institution. The protest, filmed and then placed on YouTube, ended when students were escorted -- without arrests -- from the court. University officials noted that draft "community standards" being prepared by the university explicitly protect gay and lesbian students and would bar discrimination against them. Officials said that the employment policy that does not include sexual orientation is based on state and federal statutes, which do not cover sexual orientation. "Rather than rely on the limitations provided under current federal and state law, the university strives to achieve a much higher standard based upon its Jesuit and Catholic mission and teachings," said a statement from the university.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Eastern colleges seeking to increase their Latino enrollments are starting to add admissions materials and programs in Spanish, the Associated Press reported. Bryn Mawr College started a Spanish version of its Web site. And the University of Pennsylvania is conducting some college admissions sessions in Spanish. Officials said that these efforts are in large part about reaching the families of prospective students, who play an important part in students' college decisions.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Need more evidence of the disconnect between big-time college sports and the institutions to which they are appended? The University of Southern California's football team has committed one of its football scholarships for the 2015 entering class to David Sills, a 13-year-old quarterback at a middle school in Delaware, The News-Journal of Wilmington reported. Lane Kiffin, the new coach at Southern Cal, made a similar signing of a 13-year-old last year when he was at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, and that player is presumably out of luck now that Kiffin has moved on to USC. Sills told ESPN that Southern Cal has always been his "dream school." Reports that USC's admissions office is offering slots in its 2015 undergraduate class to several very talented middle school mathematicians are false.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Whether the great blizzard of 2010 was a fun adventure, a distracting annoyance or some of each all depends on where in mid-Atlantic higher education you sit.

For the Association of Community College Trustees, the timing could not have been worse. Its National Legislative Summit was scheduled to start today in Washington, with many attendees scheduled to arrive over the weekend on flights that never took off. For much of the weekend, the ACCT tried to encourage attendance, even posting photos on its Web site of association leaders shoveling snow outside the meeting hotel. But late Sunday, the association called off plans to meet this week and said it would try to reschedule for March. A majority of attendees would be unable to make it to Washington this week. Further, the announcement noted, a major goal of the meeting is for community college leaders to meet with members of Congress and government officials, many of whom will not be working in their offices today or tomorrow.

Many students in the Washington-Baltimore area got some time off from later Friday through (in some cases) today, and many weekend classes and other events were called off. Colleges generally used Web sites to let students know where they could find dining services operating. As these photographs from The Diamondback show, students at the University of Maryland at College Park held a massive snowball fight. At Shenandoah University, students built this 10-foot-plus snowman, and also volunteered in the dining halls at the cooking and cleaning jobs of employees who lived too far away to get to campus. While many students worried about finding provisions for Super Bowl parties, St. John's College announced that a ban by Annapolis authorities on vehicular travel made it impossible to get food delivered for the scheduled party to honor the completion of senior essays, and so the event planned for Sunday would need to be postponed. (All the seniors did get their essays in, however, the college reported.)

Saturday was a big standardized testing day, but many testing centers were unable to open for scheduled administrations of the ACT and the LSAT -- new dates for the exams are expected soon.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The former executive director of a foundation that encourages college enrollment says she was fired because she questioned an arrangement in which the organization pays $40,000 annually to the commissioner of higher education in Texas, Raymund Paredes, The Dallas Morning News reported. Others also question the arrangement, given that the commissioner already has a $180,000 salary for his job. But Paredes and others defend the payments from the foundation, noting that he works on its behalf and that the arrangement violates no Texas laws.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The Christian Legal Society is attracting wide support -- particularly from religious organizations -- in its U.S. Supreme Court battle over whether public colleges and universities can enforce their anti-bias rules against religious groups. In December, the Supreme Court agreed to hear a case involving the society's chapter at the Hastings College of Law of the University of California. Hastings maintains that it is within its rights to deny recognition to groups, like the society, that engage in forms of discrimination (against gay people, for example) that the university bars. But the society maintains that enforcing such rules violates its freedom of speech and religion.

Among the religious groups that filed briefs backing the society last week are the American Islamic Congress, the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, the National Association of Evangelicals, and the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. Others filing briefs on behalf of the Christian Legal Society include the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, the College Republican National Committee, and 14 states. The briefs may be found here.

The deadline for groups backing Hastings to file briefs is next month.

Monday, February 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The University of Louisville's foundation awarded a $200,000, no-bid contract to an advertising company led by a university trustee, The Lexington Herald-Leader reported. James Ramsey, president of the university and its foundation, said it was "a mistake" to award the contract in this way to an advertising business. He also said that the university's foundation has started working on tighter contracting procedures -- a project that started after the newspaper made an open records request for information about contracts.

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