Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, April 13, 2011 - 3:00am

The membership of the Common Application is about to grow by 48 colleges, to a total of 460. While the Common Application was founded 35 years ago, half of its membership has joined in the last decade. And while the program was once associated with small liberal arts colleges, it has expanded in recent years. This year's additions include two flagship public universities -- the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Kentucky -- on top of 10 other flagships added in the past few years. Public institutions now make up 12 percent of the colleges in the program -- a record high. Another notable addition this year is Howard University, the fifth historically black college to participate.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of San Diego and the University of California at Riverside are caught up in what could be college sports' next big scandal. Federal law enforcement officials on Monday unsealed indictments of 10 people -- including former players at both universities and a former coach at San Diego -- alleging that they had engaged in a conspiracy to bribe players to fix college sports games. San Diego's president, Mary Lyons, said in a statement that "[t]hese are very serious allegations and the university is fully cooperating with the investigation."

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

A federal appeals court on Monday overturned a lower court's 2009 ruling ordering the University of Louisville to reinstate a nursing student who was expelled after she wrote on a blog about her dealings with patients. The lower court judge had concluded that the university had breached its contract with the student, Nina Yoder, but the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit ruled that the lower court had erred in that ruling because Yoder had not even alleged breach of contract before the court. The appeals panel sent the case back to the lower court to reconsider.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

Maryland's General Assembly has passed, and Governor Martin O'Malley, a Democrat, is today expected to sign legislation to allow undocumented students to pay in-state tuition rates at the state's public colleges and universities, The Baltimore Sun reported. Maryland will become the eleventh state to do so.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, California Western School of Law's James Cooper explores immigration as seen from the Mexican side of the border. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

University of Oxford officials found themselves in the uncomfortable position of publicly debating with Britain's prime minister over his assertion that the elite institution had enrolled only one black Brit in 2009, BBC News reported. Prime Minister David Cameron made his comment during a public session in answer to a question about the impact of greatly increased fees that British institutions have begun charging as part of a new approach to university financing. Cameron said: "I saw figures the other day that showed that only one black person went to Oxford last year.... I think that is disgraceful. We have got to do better than that."

University officials disputed the statement, the BBC reported, saying that only one British undergraduate from that year's class had self-identified as "black-Caribbean," but that another 26 had identified themselves as either "black-African" or "black-other," among others who characterized themselves as mixed race with some black heritage. In total, in 2009 22% of Oxford University students were from ethnic minorities, the institution said.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, one of Korea's top universities, has seen four student suicides since January, The Wall Street Journal reported, and a faculty member killed himself over the weekend, prompting more discussion of why so many have taken their own lives.

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 3:00am

La Salle University has suspended Jack Rappaport, a statistics professor at its business school, amid an investigation of allegations that he hired strippers to perform lap dances during an extra credit seminar he held on "the application of Platonic and Hegelian ethics to business," The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. Students paid $150 to attend the seminar, and the university is refunding the money. Rappaport could not be reached for comment. The incident was first reported by Philadelphia City Paper, which quoted students as saying that three dancers, wearing bikinis and high heels, performed lap dances on Rappaport and on some students. Two students who spoke anonymously to the Inquirer, however, said that while scantily clad dancers attended the class, they did not perform lap dances.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

A part-time English instructor at Olympic College in Washington has filed a formal complaint with the National Education Association, alleging that his full-time colleagues retaliated against him for speaking out against a state bill that would benefit them but hurt adjuncts. "My treatment by the [Washington Education Association] calls into question the determination and ability of the WEA to provide fair and equal representation to the overwhelming majority (10,000) of the professors who teach 'part-time' in Washington's community and technical college system," the instructor, Jack Longmate, wrote in an April 5 letter to NEA President Dennis Van Roekel. (In Washington, adjuncts are referred to as part-timers, even if some of them work full-time when all of their courses at various campuses are added together. Tenured and tenure-track professors are considered full-time.)

"The WEA has not acknowledged or addressed the serious and unmitigated conflicts of interest that exist between the part-timers, who lack any job security," continued Longmate, "and the full-timers, who have tenure and serve as their de facto supervisors."

Longmate, who was the subject of an earlier article in Inside Higher Ed, testified -- not as a union representative -- in February in front of the House Education Committee of the Washington State House of Representatives against a bill favored by the union. That bill would establish a way for the state to pay for salary increases for faculty members in the state's 34 community and technical colleges. In his letter to Van Roekel, Longmate said that his Washington colleagues censured him for coming out against a union-backed bill, demanded he resign as secretary of the campus chapter of the Association for Higher Education and rescinded his per diem and lodging for a union lobby day -- and didn't allow him a chance to defend himself. Longmate asked Van Roekel to establish a trusteeship over the Washington chapter to redress what he alleges are violations of its constitution and bylaws, and to bring in a third party to conduct an impartial investigation. Longmate contended that the issues brought forth in his complaint reflect systemic conflicts of interest between full-time and part-time faculty, and he asked the NEA to review its contracts to ensure compliance with its duty of fair representation.

The NEA was not immediately able to comment.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 3:00am

A survey of students at eight colleges and universities in North Carolina found that 17.4 percent are current users of hookahs, water pipes that have grown in popularity in recent years. Researchers at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center who conducted the study say that students seem unaware of health risks associated with the practice.

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