Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

At Madison Area Technical College, full-time faculty members can earn more than twice as much as adjuncts for teaching the same course, according to an analysis by the Wisconsin State Journal. College officials at Madison Tech and elsewhere tend to dismiss such comparisons, noting that full-time faculty have non-teaching duties. But the newspaper said that its calculations were based on the percentage of time that full-time faculty members are supposed to teach.

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Jason Scorza of Fairleigh Dickinson University explains the challenges faced by today’s veterans as they enter colleges and universities. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

A new alliance among Latin American nations is promoting an internationalization of higher education within the region as a counter to U.S. influence, Times Higher Education reported. The Bolivarian Alliance of the Americas (also known as the Alba alliance) includes Antigua and Barbuda, Bolivia, Cuba, Dominica, Ecuador, Nicaragua, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Venezuela. The alliance has been promoting universal, free higher education (sometimes drawing criticism from university leaders). Through the alliance, international student enrollments are rising in Cuba and Venezuela.

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Columbia University took a major step Friday toward the return of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps with a 51 to 17 vote of the University Senate for a resolution calling for the institution to "explore mutually beneficial relationships with the armed forces of the United States, including participation in the programs of the Reserve Officers Training Corps," The New York Times reported. Like a number of other colleges and universities, Columbia has in recent years cited the military's discrimination against gay people as incompatible with the university's values, and the federal law authorizing the end of "don't ask, don't tell" has been expected to prompt the university to welcome ROTC back. (It was removed during the Vietnam era.) Harvard University announced last month that it had negotiated to return ROTC to its campus.

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Tik Root, a Middlebury College student who was studying in Syria and was detained there while observing recent protests, has been released. A statement from Ron Liebowitz, the college's president, thanked State Department officials and members of Vermont's Congressional delegation for work to assure Root's release.

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Rising costs have led to much more scrutiny of the Pell Grant Program, but The Huffington Post noted that a key Republican may be taking criticism of a program that once had bipartisan support to a new level. Representative Denny Rehberg, a Montana Republican who is chair of the House subcommittee with jurisdiction over Education Department appropriations, compared Pell Grants to welfare in a radio interview and said that there was a major problem of people receiving the funds year after year without ever graduating. "So you can go to college on Pell Grants -- maybe I should not be telling anybody this because it’s turning out to be the welfare of the 21st century," said Rehberg. "You can go to school, collect your Pell Grants, get food stamps, low-income energy assistance, section 8 housing, and all of a sudden we find ourselves subsidizing people that don’t have to graduate from college. And there ought to be some kind of commitment and endgame."

Monday, April 4, 2011 - 3:00am

Charles McCaslin, a Southern Methodist University junior, quit his position as chair of the Texas College Republicans last week after video surfaced of him describing a hook-up and calling those opposing his preferred candidate for chairmanship of the national college Republican group "nerds and fags," The Dallas Morning News reported. The comments came in his endorsement of another candidate for the national position. McCaslin has since apologized. The video is here:

Friday, April 1, 2011 - 3:00am

Faculty members and alumni of Norfolk State University are increasingly concerned about the closed nature of the search, without any public discussion even of finalists, The Virginian-Pilot reported. University leaders have said a completely private search -- far more common at private colleges than at public institutions like Norfolk -- will yield better candidates. The university's board reportedly selected three finalists in December, offered the job to one of them and was turned down by the preferred candidate.

Friday, April 1, 2011 - 3:00am

The Apollo Group announced Thursday that the accreditor of its University of Phoenix subsidiary was intensifying a review of its recruiting and admissions practices after an initial information request "raised a number of questions about the University of Phoenix's oversight of its recruiting, admissions and financial aid practices and the ability of those practices to serve students effectively while providing them with clear and accurate information." The initial review by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools was prompted, Apollo said, by last summer's Government Accountability Office investigation into recruiting practices at Phoenix and other for-profit colleges.

The Higher Learning Commission's president, Sylvia Manning, said that the accreditor had treated the GAO inquiry like it would a formal complaint made against one of the colleges it accredits. "In this case we believe there are issues that are relevant to our criteria for accreditation and we have accordingly taken them seriously," she wrote. Manning added that the accreditor had conducted similar reviews of other HLC-accredited colleges named in the GAO report, though she declined to identify them.

Friday, April 1, 2011 - 3:00am

Sure colleges all seem to be talking about their global partnerships these days, but Bryn Mawr College has selected today -- April 1 -- to announce higher education's "first intergalactic partnership between a liberal arts college and an alien research university." The pact is with Bithnian University of Science and Technology, also known as BUST. Bryn Mawr's president, Jane McAuliffe, issued this statement on the breakthrough: "Global partnerships are so 2010. Bryn Mawr is simply beyond global, and we are boldly going where no college has gone before. Our students need to learn to be intergalactic citizens." McAuliffe's excitement over the news has apparently prompted her to adopt a Princess Leia look (see the college's home page). Bryn Mawr did note in its announcement that some students -- known as "Earthers" -- aren't happy with the alliance, and that protests are being planned. "I, for one, don’t welcome our alien overlords,” Katherine Bakke, a senior, is quoted as saying. “At Bryn Mawr we talk about students wanting to make a meaningful contribution to the world. What part of ‘world’ doesn’t the administration understand?” If you are at all confused by this news from Bryn Mawr, we refer you to today's date.

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