Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 21, 2013

Carnegie Mellon University will team up with a New York film and television production company to create an integrative media campus in Brooklyn, the latest addition to the stable of applied sciences campuses that Mayor Michael Bloomberg has helped to create in the city. The new program, which Carnegie Mellon will create in conjunction with Steiner Studios, at Brooklyn's Navy Yard, joins the Cornell University-Technion campus created through an intense competition last year, and projects led by New York University and Columbia University.

November 21, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Helen Neville of the University of Oregon discuss a method that utilizes early childhood education to overcome socioeconomic disadvantages in educational outcomes. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 21, 2013

The American Studies Association gathers this week in Washington for its annual meeting -- and one topic of discussion will be a proposal that the scholarly group back the boycott of Israeli universities. The boycott movement has had considerable support in Europe but most American academic groups have opposed boycotts of higher education institutions as antithetical to academic freedom. To date, only one American scholarly group -- the Association for Asian American Studies -- has backed the boycott movement. Some American studies scholars are speaking out against the proposal -- and many have signed a petition urging the association not to endorse the boycott.

 

November 21, 2013

Engineering students become less interested in the public welfare during the course of their time in college, according to a study by a Erin Cech, an assistant professor at Rice University who has an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering. Her study will appear soon in the journal Science, Technology and Human Values. Cech's research was based on surveys tracking attitudes of engineering students at four colleges. She sees a "culture of disengagement" that grows during college.

 

November 21, 2013

The number of international students in Canada has increased by 94 percent since 2001, climbing to a total of 265,377 in 2012, according to a new report released this week by the Canadian Bureau for International Education. (For comparison, this is slightly less than a third of the number of international students in the U.S.) The top four countries of origin – China, India, South Korea, and Saudi Arabia – mirror those of the U.S. 

In a survey of 1,509 international students in Canada, CBIE found that 91 percent are satisfied or very satisfied with their decision to study in Canada. Nearly half (46 percent) plan to become permanent residents in Canada; another 25 percent hope to stay in Canada and work for up to three years before returning home. More than two-thirds of students described opportunities to work full-time in Canada post-graduation and to obtain permanent residency as either “very important” or “essential” factors in their decision to study in Canada.

In regards to social and cultural integration – an issue of increasing concern as the number of international students rises – 78 percent of students said they’d like more opportunities to experience Canadian culture and family life. However, nearly a third of students (31 percent) said they prefer to mix with people of their own culture. Slightly more than half of students (55 percent) said their friends primarily consist of other international students, including 23 percent who said they were primarily friends with their compatriots; seven percent said they are primarily friends with Canadian students.

The survey also probes experiences of discrimination. While 82 percent agreed with the statement that Canada is a welcoming and tolerant society, minorities of students reported experiencing racial or cultural/religious discrimination in their interactions with faculty members, institutional staff, students and the broader community.

The CBIE report also considers the issue of study abroad, and finds that Canada’s participation rate of less than 3 percent is significantly lower than that of other countries.

November 21, 2013

Daily online quizzes appear to improve academic performance of students in an introductory psychology courses, and to reduce the gap in performance between lower- and upper-middle-class students, according to a study by University of Texas at Austin professors. Details are in a new article in PLoS ONE.

November 21, 2013

The University of Nicosia, in Cyprus, announced today that it will accept Bitcoin for the payment of tuition and other fees. The university is also launching a master of science degree in digital currency, which will be offered in online and on-campus formats starting in spring of 2014. The introductory course for the program, Introduction to Digital Currency, will be offered free as a MOOC (massive open online course).

 

November 20, 2013

The U.S. Education Department announced Tuesday its plan to convene a panel of negotiators to hammer out new regulations on how colleges disburse federal student aid and rewrite a controversial rule requiring online programs to obtain permission from each state in which they enroll students.

The negotiated rule making committee is also expected to tackle the underwriting standards for PLUS loans, the conversion of clock hours to credit hours when awarding credit, and rules governing when a student can receive federal aid for repeated coursework, according to a notice set to appear in Wednesday’s Federal Register.

The department plans to appoint negotiators who represent various constituencies, including students, consumer advocates, businesses, state officials and representatives from different types of institutions. It is currently seeking nominations for members of the committee. The panel will meet for three, three-day sessions in February, March and April, the department said.

The list of topics announced Tuesday, while tentative, largely round out the remaining issues that the Obama administration had announced as regulatory priorities for its second term. The department has already announced its plan to hold a separate negotiated rule making session in January to write new campus safety rules. It is also in the process of negotiating a rewrite of the “gainful employment” rules on for-profit and community colleges that a federal judge blocked earlier this year. That committee met Tuesday for its penultimate day of negotiations and appears destined to finish its work without reaching consensus on a set of rules, leaving the department in the position of being able to impose its own rules.

November 20, 2013

A senior member of the House Education and the Workforce Committee wants to hear more about adjunct professors' working conditions. Through an "eForum" announced Tuesday, Rep. George Miller (D-Calif.) will investigate the effect of increased employment of adjunct faculty on their quality of life, as well as on student learning. In a news release, Miller said there was a "huge lack of understanding" about what it means to be adjunct.

“We should all be alarmed about what’s been happening to higher education labor over the last couple decades,” he said. “Tuition keeps skyrocketing. Yet the people doing the bulk of the work educating college students are getting less and less compensation. There are adjuncts who make between $2,000 and $3,000 per course for a semester, with no benefits. There are adjuncts on food stamps. I think the Congress should be taking a serious look at this phenomenon.”

Miller asked adjuncts to share their stories on the forum website, answering the following questions:

  • For how long have you worked as a contingent faculty or instructor?
  • How would you describe the working conditions of contingent faculty and instructors at your college or university, including matters like compensation, benefits, opportunities for growth and advancement, job stability, and administrative and professional support?
  • How do those conditions help or hinder your ability to earn a living and have a stable and successful career in higher education? What impact, if any, do those working conditions have on students or higher education generally?
  • How do those working conditions help or hinder your ability to do your job, or how do they otherwise affect students in achieving their educational goals?

Miller was among several lawmakers who last week expressed interest in hearing more about adjunct employment issues during a committee hearing on the effects of the Affordable Care Act on higher education. Their comments came following testimony by Maria Maisto, president of the New Faculty Majority, a national adjunct advocacy organization. She spoke about how many institutions have cut their maximum course loads for adjuncts ahead of the health care law taking effect, to avoid having to offer coverage to adjuncts qualifying as full-time employees, or pay a fine (as highlighted in Inside Higher Ed's recent survey of campus human resources officers. In an email, Maisto said she was "thrilled" that Miller had followed up so quickly with the eForum announcement.

"I think that this will be a terrific way for the committee to collect more information confirming what I testified about last week -- the appalling conditions of adjunct and contingent faculty and the repercussions for students and for the country, especially as the cost of college is skyrocketing," she said. "Of course we have volumes and volumes of stories and research, as well, and we will be happy to share that with the committee."
 

November 20, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Peter Dodson of the University of Pennsylvania explains how the fossilization process can make individual fossils hard to interpret. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Pages

Back to Top