Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 4, 2014

Division I athletes are far more likely than the general population or those who were physically active non-athletes in college to have a range of serious health issues later in life, according to research published by Janet Simon, a graduate student at Indiana University at Bloomington, in American Journal of Sports Medicine. Simon found not only that the Division I athletes had more injuries that might have been related to injuries sustained while playing college athletics, but that they scored worse on depression and fatigue.

 

March 4, 2014

The best German scientists are leaving the country for research positions elsewhere, and too many of them don't return, according to a new report by the government's Expert Commission on Research and Innovation. Between 1996 and 2011, 19,000 researchers came to Germany, but 23,000 have gone abroad, the report found. Of particular concern, the commission said that the quality of those leaving the country (based on citations of work) was higher than those coming to Germany. "The best migrate, but rarely return to Germany. They remain attracted by research destinations abroad," the report said. The full report, available in German, may be found here.

 

March 4, 2014

Private college leaders in Tennessee want to make sure a proposal to provide free community college doesn't affect their students' wallets. The Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association says Governor Bill Haslam's free community college plan works by redistributing state aid money away from some four-year college students. Under the governor's plan, money to increase the aid to community college students would come by reducing aid to first-year and sophomore four-year college students. The private college plan would prevent those cuts to first and second-year four-year college students by rearranging other aid money and starting an endowment for community college aid.

March 4, 2014

The University of Northern Virginia doesn't sound like an institution to find in South Dakota. But the for-profit institution has relocated there, the Associated Press reported. Virginia authorities shut it down, citing a lack of accreditation, but now it has an address in South Dakota, seen by many as lax in regulating for-profit higher education. Northern Virginia officials could not be reached for comment.

 

March 4, 2014

In today's Academic Minute, Michael Bruno, dean and professor of engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, reveals how imaging technology can be used to educate and inform residence in the path of future storms. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

March 3, 2014

New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, a Republican, is being blocked by the State Senate over a controversial nominee to the Board of Regents of New Mexico Highlands University, The New Mexican reported. The nominee, Carl G. Foster, was formerly an adjunct at the university and he has sued an academic dean, a vice president, and the Board of Regents that he hopes to join. State senators said that they didn't like the idea of appointing to a board someone who is suing that board. Foster responded by dropping the lawsuit, but that hasn't won him support.

 

March 3, 2014

Northwood University, a private institution in Michigan, announced that it is closing its residential undergraduate programs in Texas, but is keeping its adult and graduate programs. A statement from the university said that "[t]hese significant actions will ensure its Texas operations' ongoing relevance, vitality, and financial strength to provide students with a world-class business education." The Dallas Morning News reported that the programs being closed will force about 400 students to transfer, and will cost the jobs of 60 full-time faculty and staff members.

 

March 3, 2014

Study abroad to Ukraine has been limited, and only 131 Americans studied there in 2011-12, according to information from the Institute of International Education. The Eastern European Study Abroad program, however, does have a program currently operating in Kharkiv, which is in eastern Ukraine. The program posted an update on Thursday saying that the students were doing well, that local universities were all operating, and that the program was "taking all necessary measurements to maintain a safe environment for all EESA participants." That update was posted before the Russian invasion of Crimea, however. The program did not respond to an email request for more current information on the Americans in Kharkiv.

 

March 3, 2014

The Iowa Board of Regents held a special meeting Friday at which members criticized Sally Mason, president of the University of Iowa, for a recent comment she made about sexual assault, The Gazette reported. In an interview with The Daily Iowan, the student newspaper, Mason said that completely eliminating sexual assaults is “probably not a realistic goal, just given human nature." The comment angered many at Iowa, which is among the universities being criticized for not doing enough about sexual assault, and Mason has apologized for her comment. Regent President Pro-tem Katie Mulholland said at the meeting Friday that Mason's comment had been “inappropriate," and that board members remain "very concerned" that women on campus were hurt by the comment and don't feel enough is being done. Mulholland said that Mason needed to do a better job of communicating on the issue.


 

March 3, 2014

More California State University campuses are adopting or proposing "student success fees" of $200 to $500 per semester to add sections, counseling and other services that promote degree completion, The Los Angeles Times reported. The campuses say that they need the funds, noting that the relatively good budget year they are having doesn't come close to making up for the cuts of previous years. But students and others say that these fees are paying for expenses that tuition is supposed to cover, and that the fees run counter to pledges to the state about minimizing tuition increases.

 

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