Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 3:00am

Taiwan's Ministry of Education has agreed to study whether universities are avoiding fair pay for faculty members by hiring part-time professors instead of full-time professors, The Taipei Times reported. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of part-time professors at universities in Taiwan increased by 63 percent. Faculty union leaders have complained that universities are trying to save money by hiring part-timers, even though there has been enrollment growth that would pay for more full-time positions. The Education Ministry adopted a regulation last year stating that while universities may use four part-time instructors to replace one full-time professor, a university's total number of part-time faculty members cannot exceed one-third of the number of full-timers.

Chen De-hua, the deputy minister of education, told the Times: "We will take a very close look into the matter and if we decide that some universities have infringed upon the rights of teachers and students, the ministry will seek to remedy the situation and look for ways to prevent re-occurrences."
 

 

Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Anthony Jack of Case Western Reserve University explains why it’s hard to be analytical and empathetic at the same time. Learn more about the Academic Minute (and listen to the podcasts published over the holiday break) here.

Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 3:00am

With the new film "Les Misérables" winning rave reviews, it was inevitable that a college parody would emerge, focusing on the struggles of today's students.

 

 

The Boston Globe reported that Boston University students -- with majors in journalism, philosophy, theater, and anthropology and with many worries about their job prospects -- created the parody.

 

Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 3:00am

The National Association of College and University Business Officers has issued guidance for colleges on using debit cards for financial aid refunds, a fast-growing practice that has led to criticism of the companies that offer the cards, which can have high fees. The association asks colleges to encourage students to use a full-fledged bank account rather than a preloaded debit card; to offer direct deposit of refunds; to use a competitive bidding process; and to negotiate no-fee or low-fee options for students from the third-party vendors that offer the debit cards. About one-quarter of colleges said in a NACUBO survey that they already use the debit cards, and 33 percent are considering doing so.

 

Monday, December 31, 2012 - 6:00am

As politicians try to avert the fiscal cliff, Lake Superior State University wants to ban it -- the phrase at least. "Fiscal cliff" tops the university's 38th annual List of Words to be Banished from the Queen's English for Misuse, Overuse and General Uselessness. The university's press release states: "If Congress acts to keep the country from tumbling over the cliff, LSSU believes this banishment should get some of the credit."

Other words and phrases banned are:

  • Kick the can down the road
  • Double down
  • Job creators/creation
  • Passion/passionate
  • Yolo
  • Spoiler alert
  • Bucket list
  • Trending
  • Superfood
  • Boneless wings
  • Guru

The rationales for the bans -- announced each year on New Year's Eve -- may be found here. Previous lists (and a place to submit a word to ban) may be found here.


 

 

Monday, December 31, 2012 - 8:54am

A New York Times article examines the potential for conflict of interest in Quacquarelli Symonds (known as QS) operating an international rankings system for universities and also a "ratings" system -- with the latter open to those who pay for an audit. The article notes that institutions that do poorly in international rankings (which tend to give the highest marks to research universities known around the world) are evaluated on different criteria, and are then awarded stars that they can use to boast and to recruit students. Two universities in Ireland are cited as examples of institutions that paid QS and now boast five-star ratings. Several international education experts are quoted expressing skepticism about whether the stars are meaningful. But the universities say that if they attract more students, their payments to QS will be worth it.

 

Monday, December 31, 2012 - 2:18pm

Many of the details on a possible deal between the White House and Congress to avert the looming "fiscal cliff" are still unclear -- including, most crucially for higher education, what (if any) spending cuts would be included. But a possible agreement on taxes, reportedly reached today between Vice President Joe Biden and the Senate Republican leader, Mitch McConnell, would extend the American Opportunity Tax Credit for college tuition for five years.

The tax credit, originally included in the 2009 stimulus bill, provides up to $2,500, of which $1,000 is refundable. It was scheduled to expire this week without Congressional action.

If a deal is not reached to avert the tax increases, many domestic discretionary programs — including some important to higher education — will see an 8.2 percent cut in 2013. In a statement Monday afternoon, President Obama said the future of the spending cuts remains unresolved, but said he would insist on a balanced approach to avert the across-the-board cuts.

Sunday, December 30, 2012 - 7:06pm

Bowl attendance is dropping, according to an analysis released Sunday by USA Today. Through this year's first 19 bowl games, attendance is down by an average of 3,138, and six games have seen drops of at least 5,000. The article said that as bowls proliferate and some teams seem to be playing a bowl game every year, fans are unwilling to spend what it costs to travel to a second-tier bowl to root for a team that had an off year (but still won a bowl bid). Last week's Military Bowl, in Washington, had attendance of 17,835 -- the lowest for any bowl game since USA Today started tracking bowl attendance in 2004-5.

 

Friday, December 28, 2012 - 10:54am

Indian President Pranab Mukherjee on Friday gave a speech calling for better standards and an enhanced private-sector role in higher education, Outlook India reported.

Mukherjee said that while ancient India had universities that were considered world leaders, many Indians today feel that they must leave the country to obtain the best possible higher education. He said that the country's top universities need to be able to compete in the top levels of international rankings, where their absence is the subject of much discussion in the country. "We must change the reality of our universities not figuring in the list of top universities of the world. Indian universities should aim at becoming top educational institutions in the world with global standards of research, teaching and learning," he said.

Further, he said that the country need more than its public universities. "It is important that the private sector also contributes its best to the provision of higher education in India," he said. "The private sector has played a key role in higher education in other countries across the world. Many top universities including Harvard, Yale and Stanford are the result of efforts of the private sector. There is no reason why Indian private sector cannot achieve similar results."

 

Friday, December 28, 2012 - 5:37pm

Florida A&M University lacked procedures and internal controls to prevent the kind of hazing that has been blamed for the death of a student in the marching band a year ago, a state investigation has concluded. The Orlando Sentinel said that the report -- released Friday -- was "sharply critical" of the university. Among the findings: The university's police department didn't communicate with the office that dealt with student disciplinary cases. So most hazing allegations reported to the police never made their way to the officials who were in charge of student conduct issues. Further, nobody at the university tracked hazing complaints, the report found. The university's lack of anti-hazing procedures violated state regulations and state laws, the report said.

Larry Robinson, interim president at the university, said officials were reviewing the report. He stressed that the university was already working on many of the issues identified. "There are no new categories of issues we had not already come to grips with," he said.

 

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