Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Anders Hakansson of the State University of New York at Buffalo reveals how a substance found in breast milk could turn the tide on drug-resistant superbugs. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 3:00am

These meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar, to which campus and other officials can submit their own events. Our site also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education; please submit your news to both listings.

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 4:24am

A letter from deans at Howard University decries "financial mismanagement" at the institution, including the use of "inaccurate, misleading data" to make decisions on cuts, The Washington Post reported. The deans blame Robert M. Tarola, an independent contractor is senior vice president for administration, chief financial officer and treasurer, and questioned the "fiscal direction" in which he is leading Howard. "We believe this direction places the very survival of the university at risk,” the deans wrote in the letter addressed to Howard trustees. University officials defended Tarola, and said that he has helped improve the university's financial condition.

 

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 4:27am

An analysis by USA Today has found 265 colleges at which the odds of students defaulting on their loans are greater than the odds of freshmen graduating. Nearly half of the colleges are for-profit institutions, and about one-third are community colleges. However, smaller shares of the students at community colleges borrow, and their loans are smaller, than at for-profit institutions.

 

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 3:00am

A Stanford University alumnus with a history of major donations has given the university its largest gift ever, Stanford announced Monday. John Arrillaga's $151 million donation will support "a variety of university projects," Stanford said. Arrillaga is a real estate developer in Silicon Valley.

 

 

Tuesday, July 2, 2013 - 3:00am

Johnson University, in Tennessee, and Florida Christian College merged Monday, creating the Johnson University System. Florida Christian will now be called Johnson University Florida, and the system will also offer courses online. Current enrollment in Florida is 371, while enrollment in Tennessee is 954.

Monday, July 1, 2013 - 3:00am

St. Augustine's University announced Friday that it has reassigned two employees, both convicted murderers who have been working on a summer camp run by the university, the Associated Press reported. One of the employees was convicted of murder in 1981 and the other in 2003. The university said that there have been no complaints about their performance. ABC News, however, quoted local parents as saying that they would want to know if employees of a program involving children had been convicted in murders.

 

Monday, July 1, 2013 - 3:00am

A proposed expansion of the Erasmus program, which funds student mobility across Europe, is in the works. The Irish Presidency of the European Union announced last week that it had brokered a €16 billion (approximately $20.8 billion) deal for Erasmus +, which for the first time would support international initiatives in education, training, youth and sport under a single umbrella. Under the agreement, more than 4 million people would receive EU grants for education and training opportunities from 2014 to 2020, nearly doubling current numbers.

The agreement is pending approval by the European Parliament. 

Monday, July 1, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Glynnis Hood of the University of Alberta explains the ecological importance of the beaver. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Monday, July 1, 2013 - 3:00am

A new Gallup Poll has found that the factor adult Americans are most likely to say is most important in selecting a college is the percentage of graduates who are able to find a good job. That factor was picked by 41 percent of those polled, followed by the price of the college (37 percent) and graduation rates (16 percent). The wealthier that respondents were, the more likely they were to say that the job success of graduates was the most important factor.

The same poll also asked questions about tuition.

Asked if higher tuition rates meant that the quality of the college was higher, 25 percent strongly disagreed and another 20 percent disagreed. Only 10 percent strongly agreed, with another 13 percent agreeing.

Gallup also asked what amount would be affordable for one year of full-time tuition (not counting room, board or books). Two percent said no tuition was affordable, 15 percent said less than $5,000, 18 percent said $5,000 to less than $10,000, 26 percent said $10,000 to less than $20,000, 10 percent said $20,000 to less than $30,000, and 5 percent said $30,000 or more. 

Disclosure: Inside Higher Ed works with Gallup on our survey projects, although Inside Higher Ed was not involved with this poll. The trends found by Gallup in this poll of all adults somewhat mirror the results of an Inside Higher Ed poll conduct by Gallup of the parents of high school and junior high school students.

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