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Friday, June 21, 2013 - 3:00am

McGraw-Hill Education plans to acquire adaptive learning software maker ALEKS. The software maker and the publishing giant have worked together over the past decade on math courseware for McGraw-Hill. ALEKS also has a standalone product, which McGraw-Hill said it will continue to offer in the "near term."

The acquisition marks McGraw-Hill's first since it was acquired by private equity firm Apollo Global Management. ALEKS is one of a number of companies trying to figure out how to make education software respond to and aid students.

Friday, June 21, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Valorie Salimpoor of the University of Toronto explains the neurology behind the human love of music. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, June 21, 2013 - 4:27am

The University of Colorado Board of Regents voted Thursday to conduct a campus survey on whether there is discrimination based on political perspectives, particularly at the flagship Boulder campus, The Denver Post reported. Regents said that there was insufficient political diversity on the faculty, and that this could lead to discrimination against students based on political perspectives. Faculty leaders have said that there is no evidence of bias against students. The survey is expected to cost at least $40,000.

 

Friday, June 21, 2013 - 4:29am

A new survey of students who are mothers found that the factor they said was most crucial to their academic success was scheduling flexibility. In the survey, 77 percent cited the issue, but one third of the mothers said that their colleges were not flexible enough. The student mothers also said that they relied on career services and academic advising. The emphasis on scheduling flexibility isn't surprising, given another finding in the survey -- that 56 percent of the student mothers work 30 hours or more each week. The survey (from a national sample) was conducted for Ivy Bridge College of Tiffin University.

 

Friday, June 21, 2013 - 3:00am

The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges notified officials at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on Thursday that the university will not be put on probation or warned over academic irregularities in the university's Department of African and Afro-American Studies that came to light last year. Instead, the university will be monitored over the next year to ensure that it follows through on plans to "make whole" the degrees of individuals who took the classes where the irregularities occurred.

Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 3:00am

The American Council on Education on Wednesday launched a campaign asking college and university presidents to promote faculty career flexibility on their campuses.

"We've found time and time again that flexible workplace policies make for happier, more committed faculty, which ultimately translates to better outcomes for our institutions and our students," Molly Corbett Broad, ACE president, said in a news release announcing the National Challenge for Higher Education: Retaining a 21st Century Workforce.

The campaign aims to reduce faculty turnover, increase productivity and engagement among faculty, and to develop means for baby boomer faculty to remain involved in institutional life upon retirement (ACE noted this is particularly important given the “looming wave” of baby boomer retirements) through more flexible work models.

Ten presidents and chancellors already have signed on to the campaign as founding partners. They are:

  • John J. DeGioia, Georgetown University
  • Mildred García, California State University at Fullerton
  • Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, University of Maryland at Baltimore County
  • Linda P.B. Katehi, University of California at Davis
  • Renu Khator, University of Houston System chancellor and University of Houston president
  • William E. Kirwan, University System of Maryland
  • David Maxwell, Drake University
  • Lynn Pasquerella, Mount Holyoke College
  • Steven G. Poskanzer, Carleton College
  • Lou Anna K. Simon, Michigan State University
Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 3:00am

Three former administrators at Carlow University have sued the institution, in federal court, charging the recent elimination of jobs has had an unfair impact on older workers, and in particular on older women, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. The women who sued were 61, 65 and 73 at the time that their jobs ended. Their suit charges that 11 positions were eliminated, 6 of them held by women over the age of 60. The suit charges that the duties performed by the administrators were given to younger employees. A Carlow spokesman said that he had not seen the lawsuit and so could not comment on it.

Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Vasileios Lampos of the University of Sheffield reveals what detailed analysis of a period literature says about the spirit of the age. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 3:00am

A New York State judge has dismissed a lawsuit against Columbia University, finding that the plaintiffs did not have standing to sue over Columbia's management of a 1927 gift by Italian-American families, Bloomberg reported. The gift was used to create La Casa Italiana as a center for Italian scholarship and culture at the university. But the suit charged that the university permitted numerous programs at the center that weren't connected to the donors' intended mission. The suit was brought by the Italic Institute of America, and the judge ruled that the institute didn't have standing to sue, despite its shared interest with the donors in Italian culture.

 

Thursday, June 20, 2013 - 3:00am

California's community college system this week unveiled a new Web tool that provides average salary levels of graduates of the state's 112 two-year colleges. The Salary Surfer database includes wage data for graduates of degree and certificate programs in about 25 disciplines. It lists the median annual salary for students two years before, two years after and five years after earning a specific credential. In April the system released Web-based "scorecards" on student performance at each college.

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