Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

The board of Metropolitan State College of Denver said Thursday that it would put off until next year its plan to seek legislation that would change its name to Denver State University, after the private nonprofit University of Denver expressed opposition to the idea, The Denver Post reported. Metro State officials argue that the name change is necessary to reflect the 24,000-student institution's mission and its centrality in the city of Denver. But "[t]he change would interfere with Denver University's essential communication with its many constituents," University of Denver Chancellor Robert Coombe said in a letter to legislators Monday, according to The Post.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Peru State College has rescinded an invitation to Greg Mortenson to appear on the Nebraska campus in September, citing allegations that portions of his book Three Cups of Tea are false, and that management of his charity has been questionable, The Lincoln Journal Star reported. The allegations, in a "60 Minutes" report, have stunned many colleges, where Mortenson is a popular speaker and his book is frequently assigned. "In light of the uncertainty surrounding Mortenson, we cannot set him out as an example for our students or southeast Nebraskans at this time, nor can we expect donors to continue to support his appearance," Peru State said in a statement.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

The Coalition for Educational Success, a lobbying group made up of for-profit colleges, announced Thursday that it was working to formulate "standards of responsible conduct" by which its member institutions would have to abide. The coalition includes more than 20 institutions that enroll 350,000 students, and has been at the forefront of the pushback against proposed federal gainful employment regulations.

Very few details were available Thursday about the standards, which are still being formulated and will be released within 90 days, said Penny Lee, managing director of the coalition. They would include more disclosure to prospective students on tuition costs, student debt and job placement, as well as guidelines for financial aid, enrollment and career placement, as well as a way to enforce the regulations. The standards will be compiled by two former governors, Thomas Kean, a Republican who led New Jersey for two terms in the 1980s, and Ed Rendell, who was Pennsylvania's Democratic governor from 2002 until January of this year, as well as "probably another four or five individuals from a variety of different aspects of higher education," Lee said.

Lee said the effort was intended in part to dispel criticism about for-profit colleges. "What we are trying to show and demonstrate is that this sector is a sector that plays a critical role, not only in education, but in the workforce and economy of this country," she said. The standards were described in vague terms, but Campus Progress, a liberal group, has already criticized the effort. "[I]f the Wall Street collapse taught us anything, it is that self-policing is at best ineffective, and at worst disastrous," the group said in a release.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Antonio Calvo, a Spanish lecturer at Princeton University, killed himself this month, a few days after being told he was losing his job, setting off many questions over how he was treated, The New York Times reported. Many of his students have raised questions about how he was treated, questioning why the university no longer wanted him to teach there. The Times reported, however, that some graduate students whom he had supervised urged the university not to renew his appointment. They complained about his management style and harsh comments he made about them.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

The embattled president of Florida's Edison State College will suggest today that trustees cut his comparatively large annual compensation of $832,000 by more than 20 percent, with a promise to use the savings to fund scholarships for students, The News-Press reported. The cut would lower Kenneth Walker's total compensation in 2011-12 to $653,173, from $832,125.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Wisconsin Pain & Policy Studies Group has decided to stop taking money from the drug industry, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. Over the last decade, it has taken in about $2.5 million from the industry. The decision to stop taking the money followed another article in the Journal Sentinel on criticism of the research center's findings supporting "controversial uses of narcotic painkillers" at a time that it was receiving the funds.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Research Council on Thursday released the corrected versions of its rankings of doctoral programs, including factors that had been recalculated based on various errors or omissions. The NRC website features links to the new and old versions. Most of the changes involve the subcategories being corrected, with relatively modest shifts in the overall categories. This article details the changes released on Thursday and this one details the generally skeptical reaction with which the NRC methodology has been greeted. The corrections released Thursday do not address the larger methodological issues cited by many critics.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Pepperdine University's Dyron Daughrity examines the different ways Christians around the world celebrate Easter. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

Facing criticism from local politicians and conservative groups, the County College of Morris board this week reversed a policy on undocumented students that was adopted only two months ago, The Star-Ledger reported. The New Jersey community college had voted to permit such students to pay in-state tuition rates if they graduated from high school in the United States and entered the country before the age of 16. But this week, the board voted to charge such students out-of-state tuition rates. For a full-time student, the shift increases tuition for a year from $3,450 to $9,780. The Daily Record reported that several board members were influenced by the threat of a lawsuit over the policy granting in-state tuition rates.

Friday, April 22, 2011 - 3:00am

David G. Carter, the former chancellor of the Connecticut State University System, has agreed to pay a $2,000 fine for not reporting a conflict of interest when his office approved the hiring of his wife, who had retired as a dean, as a temporary retiree rehire, The Hartford Courant reported. The rehire created a "double dipping" situation in which she was simultaneously receiving a pension and pay, and authorizing that should have been reported as a conflict, authorities said.

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