Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Central Oklahoma has settled a lawsuit by 12 former students and employees, who charged the former debate coach with harassment and retaliation, the Associated Press reported. The lawsuit claimed that the former coach -- Eric Marlow -- threatened to take a scholarship away from a student if she didn't have sex with him, and that he sent threatening text messages. A lawyer for Marlow declined to comment except to confirm that the suit has been resolved. Details of the settlement were not released.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

A freshman who was a pledge at Theta Chi and who was at an event with drinking Saturday night died Sunday, The Fresno Bee reported. While the cause of death has not been officially determined, alcohol is viewed as a factor. The university is suspending Theta Chi. Seven years ago, a death in another fraternity house -- following a night of drinking -- prompted the university to announce a series of new steps to prevent alcohol abuse.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s African and Afro-American Studies Department reportedly allowing athletes to take and pass no-show classes did not violate any National Collegiate Athletic Association rules, including those regarding athlete eligibility, the university said in a statement Friday. “On Aug. 23, 2012, University Counsel Leslie Strohm and Senior Associate Dean Jonathan Hartlyn provided an update to the enforcement staff,” the statement said. “The NCAA staff reaffirmed to university officials that no NCAA rules appeared to have been broken.”

NCAA eligibility rules require that, in order to compete, athletes earn at least six credit hours each term and meet minimum grade point averages, which vary depending on an institution's own standards for graduation. But the rules apparently do not address whether taking no-show classes would constitute a violation. The classes reportedly involved altered grades and little to no faculty supervision.


 

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

A feature in The Los Angeles Times describes a program at the University of La Verne in which children of migrant farm workers come to campus for a month in the summer to improve academic skills and to experience life at a college. Because many of these students don't have the stability of attending a single high school, and their families don't have much money, many face long odds against ever getting a higher education, which is why the university is focusing on reaching out to them. Adonay Montes, an assistant professor of education and the program director, said of the students: "They live the life of a college student here. We try to provide that experience so when they go back they know how to navigate the educational pipeline by being able to advocate for themselves."

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

Another faculty in Minnesota has weighed in on the November vote on the proposed amendment to the state constitution to ban gay marriage. During the first faculty meeting of the year, professors at St. Olaf College voted overwhelmingly to oppose the amendment. The college has said it will not take an official position on the issue, which another Lutheran college in Minnesota, Augsburg College, did in August.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

A new obstacle has emerged for the business school of the University of California at Los Angeles, which has been pushing a "self-sufficiency plan" for its M.B.A. program, in which it would give up state funds in return for more independence. The plan, seen as privatization by critics, has been debated for some time. A vote by the UCLA faculty in June appeared to clear the way for final approval by the University of California system.

But a committee of the systemwide Academic Senate has now tabled the proposal to approve the plan. According to the committee, the system does not currently have any policy that would allow a program that is not self-supporting to become self-supporting. Lacking such a policy, the committee declined to approve the UCLA plan. Officials of the business school could not be reached to discuss the implications of this development.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

City College of San Francisco, already facing deep budget cuts and threats that its accreditation may be removed, has yet another problem. State audits have determined that the college placed some non-academic employees in a pension system reserved for academic employees, and that inaccurate figures were used to calculate pensions for yet other employees, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Some of the employees and retirees have been told that they are being kicked out of the pension system.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Erran Carmel of American University explains the challenges time zones pose to an increasingly international workforce. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Friday, August 31, 2012 - 3:00am

Richard C. Levin announced Thursday that he will step down as president of Yale University at the end of the current academic year, at which point he will have served in that role for 20 years. He is the longest serving president in the Ivy League and in the Association of American Universities. His tenure saw significant fund-raising gains, major renovations and expansions to Yale's campus and a much improved relationship with New Haven (which had seen considerable tensions prior to Levin's presidency). The Yale announcement details these and other accomplishments.

Under Levin, Yale stuck to its policy of opposing graduate student unions, and the administration faced criticism from union advocates. Levin also strongly backed a new Yale effort to open, together with the National University of Singapore, a liberal arts college in Singapore. Many faculty members have criticized the idea (which is going forward), raising questions about human rights in Singapore and whether faculty members at Yale were given an appropriate role in deciding whether to go ahead with the project.

Friday, August 31, 2012 - 3:00am

The advanced education minister in British Columbia has sent a notice to universities, urging them to be vigilant that strip clubs may be trying to recruit students, Maclean's reported. "Students, who often feel new stresses due to new living environments and managing their own affairs for the first time, may be tempted by these monetary inducements," said the letter from the minister, Naomi Yamamoto. Her concern follows reports from Windsor, Ontario about strip club owners there offering to pay tuition for female students willing to strip -- and to maintain a B average in the courses.

 

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