Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

A new idea has emerged in the debate over whether the University of Wisconsin at Madison should be given independence from the university system and many state regulations. A key state legislator is drafting legislation that would keep the system together, but create a board for Madison that would be within the larger university system, The Capital Times reported. It is unclear whether the new idea could gain broad support.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

St. Andrews Presbyterian College, in North Carolina, may merge with Webber International University, in Florida. Both institutions are nonprofit, private and accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. SACS has moved to end accreditation of St. Andrews, but the college announced last week that SACS has agreed to extend accreditation until the end of July to permit time for the institutions to merge and seek appropriate recognition from SACS for the combined institution.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

Saudi Arabia on Sunday opened the campus of Princess Nora bint Abdulrahman University, which, with an enrollment of up to 50,000, is expected to be the nation's largest women's institution, AFP reported.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

A cheating scandal at the Upstate Medical University of the State University of New York may prevent some fourth-year students from graduating as scheduled this month, The Post-Standard reported. The cheating involved collaboration on online quizzes. Some students violated the honor code not by cheating, but by failing to report the cheating of which they were aware. University officials declined to say how many of the 154 students in the class might not graduate, but said that the figure was "more than just a handful" but less than half of the class.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 72 new members this month -- of whom 9 are women. Advocates for women in science have long complained about the relatively small number of women elected, while others have said that this reflects the overall pool of scientists, especially at the senior level. The Association for Women in Science has responded with a series of charts showing the percentages of women at senior levels of science and who win election to the National Academies. The figures suggest differing levels of progress in different science subfields, with women in engineering and applied sciences most likely to be recognized.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

Arizona State University has suspended two of its wrestling team members after video on YouTube showed them fighting with a participant in the annual "undie run" at the university, The Arizona Republic reported. While the event in which students run around the campus in their underwear is a tradition, the fighting is not, and the video has distressed many people.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

A $40 million gift being announced today by the Claremont School of Theology, a Methodist institution, will allow it to add programs to train rabbis and imams, The Los Angeles Times reported. Claremont School of Theology will now be affiliated with a new Claremont Lincoln University, which will also include the new institutions offering training in other faiths. The name of the university honors the donors of the gift, David and Joan Lincoln.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

As Internet connectivity has spread in Asia, so has distance education, which is increasingly seen as a viable alternative even in some remote areas, The New York Times reported. Experts, however, warn of lingering challenges, including the lack of Internet access in many areas, and the difficulty faced by would-be students in distinguishing between legitimate and questionable providers of distance education.

Monday, May 16, 2011 - 3:00am

Faculty members at the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay have voted 117 to 2 to unionize with an affiliate of the American Federation of Teachers. The AFT has a major organizing campaign going in the university system -- and has continued that effort despite the push by Governor Scott Walker to bar collective bargaining by system faculty members.

Friday, May 13, 2011 - 3:00am

The U.S. Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education in March sought applications for its "comprehensive" grant program, with the goal of making more than $20 million in awards. But FIPSE has now announced that there will be no grants awarded. "Congressional action on the FY 2011 budget substantially reduced funds available for grants from the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, including new grants under the comprehensive program," said a notice on the agency's website.

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