Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, May 11, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Pennsylvania has received a $225 million gift from Raymond and Ruth Perelman for its medical school, which will be renamed in their honor, The New York Times reported. The funds will support scholarships, faculty positions and research.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Saint Paul's College, in Virginia, announced Tuesday that it will eliminate its entire intercollegiate athletic program as a money-saving move, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Saint Paul's currently has seven teams for men and seven for women.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Florida's attorney general, Pam Bondi, on Tuesday announced a suit against JLF University Inc., which she said defrauded medical and nursing students by telling them incorrectly that the institution's graduates could become eligible for licenses to practice in Florida. In fact, the graduates are not eligible because the university is not accredited or approved by the state. Bondi's statement said that the owner tried at one point to let the students who made an additional payment "transfer" to a nursing program owned by his wife. The Sun Sentinel reported that JLF's main offices are in Haiti and that the phone numbers for the university had been disconnected.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011 - 3:00am

Efforts to reestablish shared governance at Idaho State University appear to have gotten off to a rocky start. Months after the State Board of Education scuttled the institution's Faculty Senate after it had voted no confidence in President Arthur Vailas, the faculty this week elected a new provisional senate charged with writing a constitution and bylaws to pave the way for a new permanent body, the Idaho State Journal reported. So far, so good. But when the leaders of the provisional senate -- many of whom were on the panel that was disbanded in February -- sought to begin work this week, they were told, to their dismay, that Idaho State administrators would not clear the way for them to do so until the fall, Phil Cole, an associate professor of physics and the provisional senate's new chairman, confirmed Tuesday.

Cole found this out, he said, when he sought a key to the Faculty Senate office, which had had its locks changed in February when administrators disbanded the panel. “We have not given an official charge to the provisional senate yet. That will happen in the fall," Provost Gary Olson wrote. "Until then, the senate is not yet in operation. The structure, scope and background information will be provided to you in the fall. We have not authorized an election of officers at this point either. I hope you have a productive summer.” The Idaho State Journal quoted a spokesman for the State Board of Education as saying that he was "surprised" that administrators were not permitting the senate to begin work. Officials at Idaho State could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

Idaho State professors got more bad news Monday, when the faculty ombudsman, John Gribas, informed his colleagues that administrators at the university had informed him that they had suspended the office -- which is designed to help faculty members resolve conflicts or problems affecting them -- until the new senate constitution and bylaws are in place. "Therefore, no ombuds office services will be available to ISU faculty during the summer 2011 session or through the 2011-2012 academic year," the office's website says. "It seems to me that this upcoming year will be one of continued transition and uncertainty, a time in which an ombudsperson’s assistance would be greatly desired," Gribas, a professor of communication and rhetorical studies, said in an e-mail to the faculty. "Therefore, until a Faculty Ombuds Office is reestablished and staffed, I encourage us all to look for ways to provide professional, supportive, and confidential assistance to our fellow colleagues in need."

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The Michigan House of Representatives has passed a budget bill for higher education that would cut funds for any institution by 5 percent for offering benefits for any partners not based on marriage (which in Michigan is not available to same-sex partners). The measure is not in a Senate version of the bill, but many senators have previously opposed domestic partner benefits, which are offered by many Michigan universities. Michael A. Boulus, executive director of the Presidents Council of State Universities in Michigan, said that the benefits are an important tool to recruit talent to the universities, in much the same way that many of the largest businesses in Michigan offer the benefits. He said that, aside from the policy question, the legislation intruded on the autonomy of the universities.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

A second legislative committee in Louisiana on Monday approved a proposal to merge Southern University at New Orleans with the University of New Orleans, The Times-Picayune reported. The measure, strongly opposed by advocates for historically black Southern, now moves to a House vote.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Federal spending on career training for adults has an enormous return on investment, and the government should be stepping up, not planning to cut, its expenditures in that area, a new report argues. The report, by the National Council of State Directors of Adult Education and the McGraw-Hill Research Foundation, comes at a time when lawmakers are beginning work on a 2012 budget that could dramatically cut spending on adult and career education.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The Executive Committee of the board of the City University of New York voted Monday evening to authorize the John Jay College of Criminal Justice to award an honorary degree to Tony Kushner, reversing a controversial board decision of a week ago. The previous vote -- prompted by a single trustee who said Kushner was anti-Israel -- angered many faculty members and other artists and intellectuals who said that Kushner's views on Israel were irrelevant to the reason he was being honored (as a playwright) and that the trustee had distorted Kushner's views. Many faculty members also criticized other CUNY officials for remaining silent while Kushner was attacked at the meeting.

At Monday night's meeting, Matthew Goldstein, the chancellor of CUNY, offered a strong endorsement of honoring Kushner. "As anyone who has experienced Mr. Kushner’s work knows, he is not afraid to provoke, to reveal emotion at the gut level, but always to the higher purpose of creating for audiences the chorus of voices and complexity of intent that define our collective humanity," Goldstein said. "His expression is grounded in compassion, empathy, and intellectual rigor. In the spirit of all great artists, he challenges orthodoxy, confronts assumptions, and tests certainties, and, in so doing, ignites our imaginations, illuminates issues and ideas, and expands our vision — whether or not we agree with him, whether or not we take exception to some of his conclusions. I believe that in many ways this is also the highest ideal of the university — a search for knowledge and understanding that values questions, dialogue, and dissent."

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Steven Cohen of Columbia University’s Earth Institute examines the necessity of incorporating an environmental sustainability component into all business and public-policy degrees. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The Texas Senate, with a strong push from Republicans, voted Monday to allow those who hold licenses for concealed weapons to carry them at public colleges and universities, the Associated Press reported. While a majority of Texas legislators have indicated support for the measure, they had been unable to schedule final votes in either legislative chamber before the Senate tally on Monday. House action is still pending. Most higher education leaders have opposed the measure.

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