Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Friday, August 24, 2012 - 3:00am

The dean of business at Hampton University has since 2001 banned male students in the five-year undergraduate/M.B.A. program from wearing dreadlocks or cornrows, WVEC 13 News reported. Some students at the historically black college have criticized the rule, but Dean Sid Credle said he believes that the ban on some hairstyles has helped students get good jobs. He also rejected the idea that the styles being banned were a part of black culture. "When was it that cornrows and dreadlocks were a part of African American history?" he asked. "I mean Charles Drew didn't wear it, Muhammad Ali didn't wear it. Martin Luther King didn't wear it."

Friday, August 24, 2012 - 3:00am

Morris Brown College, a historically black college that lost accreditation in 2003 and that has struggled to stay alive since, may be on the verge of collapse due to a foreclosure scheduled for early next month, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. The college has millions in debts and only 50 students. (Its enrollment was once 3,000.) The college is planning a prayer vigil for Saturday, hoping for a plan to move forward.

 

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Bill Ripple of Oregon State University explains the important role large predators play in the health of any ecosystem. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

Colleges in the Golden State would be prohibited from requesting access to students’ social media accounts under legislation passed Tuesday by the California Senate. Gov. Jerry Brown has until Sept. 30 to sign the bill, SB 1349, into law. Similar legislation passed in Delaware last month, and another bill passed the Maryland Senate but ultimately stalled. Colleges including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Louisville have come under criticism recently for monitoring athletes’ social media activities (with the students’ knowledge) by demanding access to their accounts, requiring them to “friend” athletics department employees on Facebook, and using software to monitor who publishes words such as “drunk driving” and “drugs.” Some of the bills, including the one in California, have been counterparts to legislation prohibiting employers from regulating employees’ social media use.

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

The families of the donors who gave Columbia University $400,000 in 1927 to build Casa Italiana are suing the university, arguing that it has ignored the intent of the gift, Bloomberg reported. The purpose was to create a center for study of the Italian language and culture, the suit argues. Instead, the university has placed a research center there that, though focused on Italy, runs many programs that are "elitist and detached, European and international." Further, the suit charges that some of the programs play on Italian-American stereotypes. One such program identified in the complaint was called "What’ya mean I’m funny? Ball-busting Humor and Italian American Masculinities," A Columbia spokesman said that the university does not comment on litigation.

 

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Texas at Austin is in negotiations about joining two prominent organizations that offer MOOCs (or massive open online courses), The Texas Tribune reported. The two are Coursera and edX. Texas officials said that the outcome of the negotiations could be announced in a few weeks.

 

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

Regent University announced Wednesday that it plans to filed a trademark complaint against the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia for naming two merged institutions Georgia Regents University, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. Before the Georgia regents voted on the name, Regent University expressed concern about the plan. The Georgia system declined to comment. Georgia Regents University combines Augusta State and Georgia Health Sciences Universities.

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

A recently released poll of education leaders, including lawmakers and current and former Education Department staff, found that most think Mitt Romney's selection of Representative Paul Ryan as a running mate isn't terribly significant for education -- except for the future of the Pell Grant. "Education is not Paul Ryan's thing and he's not likely to focus on it," said one respondent, according to Whiteboard Advisors, which released the poll Wednesday. But because Ryan's budget would force changes to Pell, several suggested that program -- for better or worse -- could be a policy focus in a Romney/Ryan administration.

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

Graham Spanier, who was forced out as president of Pennsylvania State University over the Jerry Sandusky scandal, has given his first extensive interview since the turmoil became public, telling The New Yorker about his friendly relations with the late Joe Paterno and what he knew (or maintains he didn't know) about what Sandusky did. Spanier disputes many of the findings of the Freeh Report, which was commissioned by the university, and says he was not told of the seriousness of the allegations against Sandusky in the now-infamous shower incident. Spanier also suggests that the university's leaders erred in largely endorsing the findings of the Freeh Report, which he predicts will be found to be inaccurate in key ways.

 

Thursday, August 23, 2012 - 3:00am

A Christian college in Minnesota has joined a coalition opposing an amendment to that state's constitution to ban gay marriage. Augsburg College, associated with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, announced Tuesday that it had joined Minnesotans United for All Families, a coalition of organizations working to defeat the proposed amendment. (Minnesota state law does not allow gay marriage.) Minnesota state law allows organizations with nonprofit status, including colleges, to weigh in on ballot measures.

Augsburg is the second college to publicly oppose the amendment, although faculty members at other colleges have also spoken out against it. Capella University, a for-profit college, announced Aug. 3 that it opposed the amendment. "Capella is a stronger place because of our diversity, and we have made an intentional effort to create a workplace that is supportive of families of all backgrounds," the company's chairman and chief executive officer, Kevin Gilligan, said in a statement at the time. "Just as importantly, I am very concerned that this amendment will have a negative impact on the ability of Minnesota companies to attract and retain talented employees."

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top