Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

April 1, 2013

The Orange County Register is selling three universities ads that will appear in special weekly sections that will contain "positive" news about the institutions, The Los Angeles Times reported. A memo from an administrator at the University of California at Irvine -- one of the participating universities -- said that its public relations staff would serve as "content advisors, idea generators and collaborators" on the project. The participating institutions, in addition to Irvine, are Chapman University and California State University at Fullerton. Each will pay $275,000. Register officials said that they would still make final decisions on content, and that the news pages would not be affected by the pledges about the kind of content to appear in these special sections.

Jeffrey Brody, a professor of communications at Fullerton and a former Register reporter, said that the new approach would be "wonderful for the universities," but he questioned whether this was appropriate for a newspaper. "If publishing the sections is dependent upon advertising revenue from the universities, then the Register might as well call itself a newsletter rather than a newspaper.... If this is the way Publisher [Aaron] Kushner intends to revitalize the newspaper industry, he needs to brush up on journalism ethics and principles."

April 1, 2013

Jerry Falwell Jr., the chancellor of Liberty University, is denying a report that the institution and its students are becoming more liberal. New York magazine reported that opposition to gay marriage used to be a united political belief at the university. But over the last week, while two Supreme Court cases about gay marriage captured national attention, the university was quiet on the issue and some students said that there were a range of opinions on the issue.

But the day after that article ran, Falwell sent a letter to the author of the article, stating that Liberty remains a conservative institution, even if the political mood has changed a bit. "[M]ost of our faculty, staff and students are very conservative politically and theologically. I do not see that changing at all," he write. "For example, in Liberty’s voting precinct, Romney won 93 percent of the vote and that precinct had, by far, the highest turnout in the area. Students still are very much pro-life and pro-traditional marriage just like they have always been and the ones who voted for Romney indicated those two issues were the main reasons they supported Romney over Obama. The only shift I have noticed in recent years has been more support among conservative Christians, especially young ones, for libertarians. In Virginia, only Romney and Ron Paul were on the ballot in the Republican primary and Ron Paul won at the campus precinct. So, if anything, our students are becoming more conservative on the issue of limiting the size and scope of government while remaining conservative on the social issues."

 

April 1, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Sam Sommers of Tufts University demonstrates how our behavior is often influenced by the context of our daily lives.  Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

April 1, 2013

Proposed legislation in France would ease restrictions on offering university courses in English, The Connexion reported. Currently, courses must be in French unless they are courses to teach a non-French language or offered by a visiting academic from outside France. Some educators want the option of teaching other courses in English to attract more British and American students. Many universities in European countries that are not primarily English-speaking are adding such courses. But leading French writers have launched a campaign calling the proposed changes "insulting," and the Académie Française has said that any change would "harm the status of the French language in universities."

March 29, 2013

Brenda Scheer, dean of the University of Utah architecture school, resigned on Thursday, following an 11-year tenure and a recent period of controversy, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. Scheer has been criticized for the resignation of Prescott Muir as architecture chair. Students and faculty members accused Scheer of forcing Muir out, prompting her to apologize and Muir to agree to continue in the role. But the criticism of Scheer continued.

March 29, 2013

Federal authorities have charged 11 people in the Detroit area in four separate crime rings in which people applied for student loans for which they were not eligible, costing the government more than $1 million, The Detroit Free Press reported. The schemes generally involved distance education providers where students need not be physically present in class. Those applying for the loans lacked either a high school diploma or a GED and thus were not eligible.

 

March 29, 2013

Most universities will face only minimal effects from the automatic budget cuts that went into effect at the beginning of the month, according to a report released Thursday by Moody's Investors Service. The report looked at the projected financial effect of the 5 percent cuts to domestic discretionary spending, known as sequestration, and found that only 1 percent of colleges and not-for-profits stood to lose more than 3 percent of their annual revenue as the result of the cuts.

Research universities were most likely to be hit hard by the cuts because federal funding for scientific research is one of the areas affected. While some financial aid programs -- particularly federal work-study and the Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant -- will also be cut, the Pell Grant, bedrock of need-based financial aid programs, is safe for the 2013-14 academic year.

March 29, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Robert Schwartz of Mount Holyoke College explores the historical events that inspired Victor Hugo to pen Les Misérables. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

March 29, 2013

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday unveiled a new database on consumer complaints on various financial services and products, including student loans. “By sharing these complaints with the public, we are creating greater transparency in consumer financial products and services,” said a statement from Richard Cordray, director of the bureau. “The database is good for consumers and it is also good for honest businesses. We believe the marketplace of ideas can do great things with this data.”

March 29, 2013

Journal publishers and others are investigating Benjamin A. Neil, a professor in the accounting department, for what some are calling plagiarism, The Baltimore Sun reported. A librarian who is a plagiarism watchdog notified Towson officials and others of what he saw as plagiarism, and the Sun did its own review, which it said "shows passages with identical language and others with close similarities to scholarly journals, news publications, congressional testimony, blogs and websites. In many cases, there was no attribution." Neil denied wrongdoing, saying "I don't think I've done anything wrong. The issue seems to be that I didn't put things in quotes. But I've given attribution to people."

Pages

Back to Top