Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 3:00am

The Indiana University System announced Wednesday that it would shut down its School of Continuing Studies to save as much as $4 million a year. The closure of the school, which provides online and evening classes to about 4,000 undergraduates and some non-degree programs as well, comes nearly a year after Indiana's governor, Mitch Daniels, essentially created a new online institution in the state by striking a deal to let the nonprofit Western Governors University provide courses to Indiana residents. At that time, the head of Indiana's continuing studies school said that he did not see the new arrangement creating too much overlap with the school's own market. "There's plenty of work to be done" in using online education to reach underserved Indianans, Dean Daniel J. Callison said.

Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 3:00am

A survey by a German research center found that one in three university students in Berlin would consider sex work (defined as prostitution, erotic dancing or Internet shows) to pay for tuition, Reuters reported. Four percent of the students reported that they had already used sex work to pay their expenses. Eva Blumenschein, one of the study's authors, told Reuters that reforms designed to speed up degree completion may encourage sex work. "It's possible that because educational reforms have increased student workloads, they have less time to earn money," she said. "Coupled with higher student fees, in this instance, leads students into prostitution."

Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Preston Mitchum gave a speech at his law school graduation from North Carolina Central University last week that in significant portions came from one given last year by a student at the State University of New York at Binghamton, The News & Observer reported. Mitchum said he found the speech -- whose theme dealt with being average -- on YouTube. He said he meant to credit the original, but didn't. Anthony Corvino, who gave the talk at Binghamton, said that Mitchum had called him to apologize, and that he believed the apology was sincere. Raymond Pierce, law dean at North Carolina Central, was less forgiving. "Quite frankly, I'm disgusted," Pierce told the News & Observer. "I spared no words in expressing to Mr. Mitchum how disgusted I am with this, and shocked. I mean, he is a student leader here at our law school. Plagiarism is a sad, yet unfortunate reality in higher education, we all know that. That is not to make any excuse but it is a sad and unfortunately reality. I would say, of all places, a school of law has no place for that."

Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Kye Allums, the openly transgender man on the George Washington University women’s basketball team, announced Wednesday that he will not play next season. Allums made headlines last November when he publicly came out and became the first openly transgender person to play Division I college basketball. The junior played in only eight games this past season before he was sidelined by multiple concussions. Allums wrote in a statement published by the Associated Press: “I alone came to this conclusion, and I thank the athletic department for respecting my wishes.” Allums offered no further details about his early departure from the basketball team. George Washington officials, however, confirmed that Allums has enrolled in classes for the fall semester.

Thursday, May 19, 2011 - 3:00am

Academic staff members -- including non-tenure-track faculty -- have voted to unionize at the University of Wisconsin at Superior. The vote there was the latest in a series at Wisconsin campuses to unionize, despite the drive by Governor Scott Walker and legislative Republicans to end collective bargaining by system faculty members. The unions voted in at Superior and elsewhere in the system are affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers. The vote at Superior was 89 to 5.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The Yale University fraternity that shouted “no means yes, yes means anal” during a pledge initiation last fall has been all but banned from the campus. For violating Yale’s undergraduate regulations on “harassment, coercion or intimidation” and “imperiling the integrity and values of the university community,” the campus chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon is prohibited for five years from “conducting any fraternity activities on campus,” including recruiting, and from using Yale bulletin boards or e-mail to communicate with students. The sanctions also “severely limit its use of the Yale name in connection with the DKE organization.” The committee that issued the sanctions, which is charged with enforcing the undergraduate regulations, also formally recommended that the national fraternity organization suspend the chapter for five years.

Some students face additional punishments, but those are confidential under Yale and federal privacy laws. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said it is unusual to announce the committee's findings, but because the incident made a huge stir on the campus and attracted national attention, she sent a statement to all students and faculty of the college. The university itself is under federal investigation after a student complaint under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, alleged a sexually hostile climate on campus.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Victoria Bussert of Baldwin-Wallace College links the surging popularity of musical theater to the success of shows like "Glee," and offers a reality check for aspiring stars. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association announced Tuesday that 909 teams have earned “public recognition awards” for their academic performance. These awards are given annually to teams that score in the top 10 percent in each sport using the Academic Progress Rate, an NCAA-developed score that shows how a team's athletes are faring with regard to academic eligibility to play and progress toward graduation. For the sixth year in a row, Yale University had the most teams recognized, with 23. By conference, the Ivy League had the highest number of teams honored, with 135. The next highest was the Patriot League, with 82. Four national champions from the 2009-10 season received “public recognition awards” for their academic performance: Duke University men’s basketball, Fairleigh Dickinson University women’s bowling, University of Michigan men’s gymnastics, and University of Denver women’s skiing. Full APR scores for all teams will be released May 24. Punishments for those teams with low scores will also be announced that day.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Texas Board of Regents, facing a backlash from faculty members and others over its recent suggestions about research and faculty priorities, has pledged not to try to micromanage the system. But The Austin American-Statesman reported that even as such pledges were being made, one regent was sending off requests for individual faculty members' workloads, grade averages for each undergraduate course and student evaluations of instructors. The e-mails suggest a continued focus on metrics suggested for higher education by a think tank with close ties to Republican leaders in the state.

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 - 3:00am

Major expansion plans for public higher education are relatively rare in these frugal times, but Connecticut Governor Dannel P. Malloy on Tuesday proposed an $864 million expansion plan for the University of Connecticut Health Center, The Hartford Courant reported. The plan -- which would rely on a mix of bonds, private fund raising and other revenue sources -- would expand the enrollments of the university's medical and dental schools, add faculty slots, and create additional facilities. The governor stressed the job-creation aspects of the plan -- both the construction jobs in the short term and biomedical jobs in the long term.

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