Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 28, 2012

A large majority of Americans who have attended college believe higher education is a good investment (83 percent) and key to achieving the American dream, according to the results of a national opinion poll Northeastern University released on Tuesday. But an equal proportion of all respondents, including those who had not attended college, said the U.S. higher education system needs to change in order to remain competitive with those of other countries. The poll also found that most Americans believe in the growing value of online degrees. Among respondents between the ages of 18 and 30, 68 percent said an online degree will be just as recognized and accepted among employers as a traditional degree will be in the next five to seven years.

November 28, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Youngjin Yoo of Temple University explores how digital materials evolve in way their creators never imagined. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

November 28, 2012

One painting in an exhibit at Bunker Hill Community College's art gallery is drawing a lot of outrage and praise, The Boston Globe reported. The exhibit is of art inspired by the 2012 presidential campaign, and the painting in question depicts Obama as Jesus.  Michael D’Antuono, the artist, told the Globe that he is not suggesting that Obama is Jesus, but that he wanted to comment on the extent to which the president's critics have "crucified" him.

 

November 28, 2012

The University of Tulsa on Tuesday suspended its new athletics director, Ross M. Parmley, amid a federal investigation into whether he is linked to a man under federal indictment for running an illegal gambling operation, The Oklahoman reported. Parmley has admitted to federal authorities that he bet on college and professional games for years before quitting gambling in 2010. At that time, he worked for Tulsa's athletics department, but had yet to become its director.

 

November 27, 2012

Two Kentucky newspapers -- The Herald-Leader and The Courier-Journal -- recently obtained open records showing that the reported attendance at University of Kentucky football games far exceeded what some people would consider actual attendance (the number of actual tickets scanned at each game). When the journalists attempted to find the data for the last home game, they found that they couldn't get it. As The Courier-Journal reported, the university announced that it was no longer keeping attendance -- so it had no information to give out.

 

November 27, 2012

The 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order is going to the authors of a book on non-violence. Erica Chenoweth, assistant professor at the University of Denver, and Maria Stephan, a foreign affairs officer with the U.S. State Department, were honored for Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Non-Violent Conflict, published by Columbia University Press published the book in 2011. The award is worth $100,000.

November 27, 2012

The McGraw-Hill Companies has sold its education division to Apollo Global Management for $2.5 billion, the companies announced Monday. Lloyd G. (Buzz) Waterhouse, president and CEO of McGraw-Hill Education, said in an interview Monday that customers who use McGraw-Hill products and services should expect "very little" change in the short term, "and definitely not a change in service levels." Waterhouse said that the company would continue to expand in digital education, and that -- as a private company -- "we won't need to worry about short-term focus and pressures."

 

November 27, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Jeremy Green of King’s College London explains how Alan Turing’s mathematical genius continues to guide scientists more than fifty years after his death. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 27, 2012

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ordered the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit to hear Liberty University's challenge to provisions of President Obama's health care overhaul. The Fourth Circuit had dismissed Liberty's lawsuit contesting the health care law's provisions on the employer mandate to provide insurance and contraception coverage, citing the fact that the provisions had not yet taken effect. But the Supreme Court said that its ruling this summer upholding the overall health care law did not preclude Liberty's suit.

November 27, 2012

Florida Governor Rick Scott, a Republican, on Monday called for community colleges -- many of which in his state already offer bachelor's degrees -- to do so for total student costs of $10,000, The Orlando Sentinel reported. Those community colleges with bachelor's programs generally cost more than that. Texas Governor Rick Perry, a Republican, has championed the idea of the $10,000 degree and several such programs have launched in Texas. But close analysis of the programs suggests that students in other programs are subsidizing the $10,000 program students, and that the reforms have been more about pricing (for a small number) rather than college costs generally.

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