Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Harvard University has been engaged in a project to diversify the subjects of the many oil portraits that hang in libraries and various other public spaces at the university, The Boston Globe reported. A 2002 inventory found that of 750 such portraits, 690 were of white men, only two were of minority individuals, and the rest were of white women -- generally the wives of presidents, members of benefactors' families, or Radcliffe College professors. In recent years, 10 new portraits of minority individuals linked to Harvard have been added to the collection. The latest, unveiled Friday, is of Chester Pierce, a 1948 Harvard graduate who for many years was a professor of psychiatry and education and who is believed to have been the first black college student to play a football game at an all-white Southern university (the University of Virginia). A Globe slide show features some of the other portraits recently added to Harvard's collection.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Hundreds of climate scientists, organized in a new effort being announced today by the American Geophysical Union, are pledging to fight back against politicians who dispute established findings and who threaten scientists with politically motivated investigations, the Chicago Tribune reported. More than 700 researchers have agreed to participate in the campaign. "This group feels strongly that science and politics can't be divorced and that we need to take bold measures to not only communicate science but also to aggressively engage the denialists and politicians who attack climate science and its scientists," said Scott Mandia, professor of physical sciences at Suffolk County Community College in New York.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

Ontario's government has announced a new program under which 75 top international doctoral students will receive full scholarships, with the government paying two-thirds of the costs and the universities picking up the rest, The Globe and Mail reported. The program is part of a larger campaign by Ontario political and academic leaders to attract more foreign students, especially those at the very top who are also recruited by American universities. But critics of the government, Maclean's reported, are questioning the strategy, charging that it is taking away money and spots from Canadian students.

Monday, November 8, 2010 - 3:00am

The American Association of University Professors has written to George M. Philip, president of the State University of New York at Albany, urging him to reconsider plans to end all admissions to programs in French, Italian, Russian and classics. The letter notes the deep budget cuts faced at Albany and other SUNY campuses, but questions both whether these eliminations are necessary and whether faculty members were appropriately involved in the process to plan budget reductions. The letter endorses a view already expressed by faculty members there that eliminating these departments will erode the "core academic mission" of the university. The AAUP letter notes that the SUNY system is on the association's censure list for faculty layoffs in 1977. Those layoffs included an earlier round of language program eliminations at Albany, the AAUP recalls, adding: "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose." A spokesman for Albany said via e-mail on Friday: "We received the letter today amd are reviewing it. We will respond to AAUP directly, as appropriate."

Friday, November 5, 2010 - 3:00am

When President Obama heads to India this weekend, he will be accompanied by presidents from several of the many universities that are exploring possible ties to the country as it prepares to open its doors to foreign institutions, Bloomberg reported. Officials from Arizona State, Boston and Rutgers Universities are among the group, according to the news service.

Friday, November 5, 2010 - 3:00am

Utah's attorney general met with Justice Department officials this week about a possible federal investigation into whether college football's Bowl Championship Series violates antitrust laws, the Associated Press reported. Mark Shurtleff, the Utah attorney general, told that AP that while the federal officials did not commit to an inquiry, "they had done their homework."

Friday, November 5, 2010 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association on Thursday penalized the University of Michigan for major violations involving its football program. The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions placed the institution on three years' probation and backed Michigan's decision to reduce its football practice time by 130 hours over the next two years. The trouble for the Wolverines started when Rich Rodriguez became head football coach in January 2008. During his first year and a half at Michigan, Rodriguez’s team exceeded NCAA playing and practice limits — put in place to protect player safety and guaranteeing time for academics — by approximately 65 hours.

Football staff members “monitored and conducted voluntary summer workouts, conducted impermissible activities outside of the playing season, required student-athletes to participate in summer conditioning activities as a form of punishment, and exceeded time limits for athletic activities outside the playing season.” The football team also exceeded the number of NCAA allowed coaches by retaining “five quality control staff members,” who “were on the sidelines for practice and games, traveled with the team, wore the same attire as coaches, shared office space with the football staff and attended team meetings.” The NCAA determined that the institution and Rodriguez “failed to monitor” the football program and ensure that it was adhering to rules. In addition to the probation and practice restrictions for the institution, the only punishment for Rodriguez is that he must attend a NCAA rules seminar next year.

Friday, November 5, 2010 - 3:00am

A Tennessee judge on Thursday granted financially imperiled Fisk University's request that it be allowed to sell off part of its renowned art collection -- but imposed restrictions on the sale that left Fisk officials balking, The Tennesseean reported. Under the ruling, which was the latest step in a long-running saga over Fisk's attempts to sell a collection of Impressionist and Georgia O'Keeffe paintings, the judge ruled that Fisk could sell the works to another museum, but said that it had to put two-thirds of the expected $30 million in proceeds into a trust aimed at preserving the art if Fisk were to go under, the newspaper ruled. The ruling reportedly disappointed both Fisk officials and the state attorney general, which has sought to stop the sell-off.

Friday, November 5, 2010 - 3:00am

Anoka Technical College and Anoka-Ramsey Community College are two Twin Cities area colleges that are part of the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities System and both have interim presidents. On Thursday, the system announced that it would seek a single president for both colleges. Officials said that this "realignment" will not be a merger of the colleges, but rather will be an attempt to achieve better coordination and economies of scale at administrative levels.

Thursday, November 4, 2010 - 3:00am

In comments that were widely characterized as solemn and full of contrition, after what he acknowledged was a "shellacking" for which he was largely responsible, President Obama reaffirmed his belief that further spending on education and research was necessary to assure an economic recovery. At the news conference after his party lost control of the House of Representatives and barely kept its grasp on the Senate, Obama conceded that he might have to compromise on health care and other key priorities, and that the need to control the deficit would require a contraction of federal spending. But "as we bring [the deficit] down, I want to make sure that we’re not cutting into education that is going to help define whether or not we can compete around the world. I don’t think we should be cutting back on research and development, because if we can develop new technologies in areas like clean energy, that could make all the difference in terms of job creation here at home." He added: “[I]n these budget discussions, the key is to be able to distinguish between stuff that isn’t adding to our growth, isn’t an investment in our future, and those things that are absolutely necessary for us to be able to increase job growth in the future as well."

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