Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 4:19am

Pericles Lewis has been named the inaugural president of the Yale-NUS College, a new institution jointly created by Yale University and the National University of Singapore. Lewis is a Yale professor whose work focuses on British and European literature who has been involved in designing the academic programs of the new college.

 

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 3:00am

The U.S. Education Department's top-ranking postsecondary education official is heading back to campus.

Eduardo M. Ochoa, assistant secretary for postsecondary education, will leave the Obama administration to become interim president of California State University at Monterey Bay, the Cal State system announced Tuesday. Ochoa, who had been provost and vice president for academic affairs at Sonoma State University before President Obama nominated him for the Education Department job two years ago, will succeed Monterey Bay's current president, Dianne Harrison, who has been named to lead California State University Northridge.

Ochoa is the second member of Education Secretary Arne Duncan's higher education political team to leave the administration leading up to the 2012 election, following James Kvaal's decision last fall to join Obama's campaign staff. Political appointees are typically discouraged from leaving in an election year, for fear of signaling lack of confidence in the incumbent's prospects. As assistant secretary, Ochoa has had a typically broad portfolio as assistant secretary, helping carry out (and defend) the administration's gainful employment and other program integrity rules, encouraging the collection of better data about higher education performance and productivity, and urging college leaders to bring their spending and prices under control.

 

 

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 3:00am

Attorneys general in more than 20 states sent a letter Tuesday urging Congressional leaders to tighten federal rules in ways that could limit the ability of some for-profit colleges to enroll military service members and veterans using government aid. The letter, signed by 21 attorneys general and one state consumer protection official, calls on Congress to enact legislation that would count military and veterans' education aid along with Education Department student grants for the purposes of a federal rule that requires for-profit colleges to derive at least 10 percent of their revenues from sources other than federal aid. Right now military and veterans' educational aid is excluded from that total. Changes in the rule are unlikely given the current makeup of Congress.

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 3:00am

Bassel Al Shahade, who was a Fulbright Scholar from Syria pursuing an M.F.A. at Syracuse University, was killed Monday in Homs, Syria, the site of government assaults on protesters and civilians. He was killed while filming the attacks by government security forces. "This is a terrible tragedy for Bassel’s family and friends in Syria and for all his fellow students, faculty and friends here in Syracuse who knew him. His death is also a tragedy for the Syrian people, who have suffered many months of tragic violence as they seek greater freedom for their nation," said a statement from Nancy Cantor, the chancellor at Syracuse. "As a university community, we must deplore the senseless violence by Syrian government forces that took the life of Bassel, and countless others over these many months."

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, David Wilkinson of Liverpool John Moores University examines the role methane may have played in warming the Earth during the time of the dinosaurs. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Wednesday, May 30, 2012 - 3:00am

High schoolers who make overnight visits to colleges they are considering are engaging in potentially dangerous or illegal behavior, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Center for Adolescent Research and Education at Susquehanna University and the group Students Against Destructive Decisions. A survey of more than 1,000 teens who said they had been on an overnight college visit found that:

  • 16 percent reported drinking alcohol on the visit.
  • 17 percent had sex or engaged in "intimate sexual behavior" during the trip.
  • 5 percent reported using drugs other than alcohol.
  • 2 percent drove while impaired.
Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 3:00am

A new website called Not in My Country has been created to allow for reports of corruption, harassment or incompetence at universities in Uganda, The Wall Street Journal reported. The idea behind the website -- which also includes faculty ratings similar to RateMyProfessor.com in the United States -- is that a system for anonymous reporting is badly needed for higher education in the country.

 

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 3:00am

When the University of Missouri System announced on Thursday that it was shutting down the University of Missouri Press, initial response was muted. Employees of the press did not return calls, and the university said that it could not identify the faculty advisory committee for the press. The university said that it couldn't continue to subsidize the press, which currently receives about $400,000 annually.

Over the holiday weekend, however, opposition started to materialize. A Facebook page -- Save the University of Missouri Press -- appeared Monday. One post there: "As an alumnus of the University of Missouri, I am disappointed and angry to learn that you have decided to close the University of Missouri Press. Where are your priorities? What has happened to the school’s standing as the state’s flagship university? Is the institution to be known more and more only for its athletic programs? Will Truman State become known as Missouri’s university most interested in academics?" (Truman State has a university press.)

Letters to the editor are also appearing in local publications, questioning why a $400,000 subsidy would be out of the question at a university that pays its head football coach $2.7 million.

 

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 4:23am

In many states in recent years, summer enrollments have gone way up at public institutions, as students who struggle to get into sections during the regular academic year take advantage of greater availability in the summer. But in California, higher education budgets are so tight that many community colleges have cut way back on summer programs -- despite student demand, The Los Angeles Times reported. Eight community college campuses plan no summer courses this year, and the community college system's summer enrollment was down 43 percent from 2008 to 2011. A survey by Santa Monica College found that, at 15 community colleges in the Los Angeles area, only one-third of the courses offered in 2008 are going to be offered this year, representing a loss of 6,000 teaching assignments and 168,000 classroom seats.

Tuesday, May 29, 2012 - 3:00am

Graham Spanier, former president of Pennsylvania State University, on Friday sued the university to demand access to e-mail records from 1998 to 2004, The Patriot-News reported. The records were thought to have been destroyed when the university switched e-mail systems, but the e-mail files recently have been recovered. Spanier's suit says that he didn't have access to the files when he testified before a grand jury looking into alleged molestation of boys by Jerry Sandusky, a former football coach. Much of the molestation allegedly took place on Penn State's campus, and the issue of what senior administrators knew has become a major issue in the case against Sandusky and (potentially) other cases. Spanier's suit says he cannot meet with independent investigators looking into the case without access to the old e-mail messages, but Penn State says that it has been informed by a state assistant attorney general that it should not turn over the records.

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