Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

Wagner College has ended a requirement that all applicants submit either SAT or ACT scores. “We believe that the best predictor of a student’s potential to succeed at Wagner is the student’s high school transcript,” said Angelo Araimo, vice president for enrollment and planning, in a statement.

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 - 3:00am

An article in Business Week looks at why some universities (a small minority in fact) select CEOs, not academics, to lead business schools. "That kind of narrow and bounded perception of what deans do has changed really dramatically, so now in many places there is really a heightened expectation that the dean should be the public face of the school," Dan King, executive director of the American Association of University Administrators, told the magazine. "Business schools, in particular, want to present a prestigious public face. One way of presenting that image is showing they can recruit a leader who has been a successful executive in business and industry."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

A new California law requires public colleges and universities to let students from foster care -- who frequently have no place to go during the summers -- to have access to dormitories year-round, the Los Angeles Times reported. About 700 University of California students came from the foster care system, as did 1,200 at California State University campuses and several thousand at community colleges.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The Federal Bureau of Investigation on Friday admitted that it tracked Howard Zinn, the noted historian and political activist who died in January, from 1949 to 1974, and the bureau released 423 pages of records from the monitoring of Zinn. Salon noted that this monitoring took place "despite having apparently no evidence that he ever committed a crime." And TPM noted that the records indicate that a senior official at Boston University, where Zinn taught, tried to have him fired in 1970. (If you are wondering if that official might have been John Silber, the long-time BU president with whom Zinn had many disagreements, it wasn't, as Silber hadn't been hired at the time.)

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

Some University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center faculty members have been letting medical residents operate at a public hospital with less supervision and training than is standard and generally seen as necessary, The Dallas Morning News reported. While UT officials denied wrongdoing, the article cited the resignation of one faculty member in protest, and concerns expressed by other faculty members and various warnings in consultants' reports. The faculty member who quit said that the hospital had become "clinical fodder."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has brought civil charges against Samuel Wyly and Charles Wyly, two brothers, for securities fraud. While the SEC is accusing them of hundreds of millions of dollars in gains through insider trading, one charge relates to the University of Michigan. AnnArbor.com reported that Samuel Wyly's $10 million gift in 1997 came from cash he gained through securities fraud. A lawyer for the brothers has denied wrongdoing. A spokeswoman for the university said: "Mr. Wyly has been a long-time friend and supporter of the university. We're sorry to hear he is facing these difficult circumstances."

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

William Pollard is drawing mixed reviews in his first year as president of Medgar Evers College. The New York Times reported that some faculty members and leaders of the City University of New York praise his efforts, but some of his changes are angering others at the college. One dispute involves the Center for NuLeadership on Urban Solutions, which works with former prisoners. The new administration is asking a series of questions about the program, suggesting a lack of confidence that it is a national think tank. Further, administrators have angered supporters of the center by hesitating to endorse a plan to bring 300 nonviolent drug offenders to campus over the next three years, the Times reported.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

Stevens Institute of Technology appears to be moving past last year's administrative and financial turmoil, in part due to reforms pushed by New Jersey's attorney general, The Star-Ledger reported. The president whose compensation levels were criticized has stepped down and the board has instituted a series of new rules designed to assure proper oversight and greater transparency.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The U.S. Education Department has told state officials in California that the federal government will terminate its agreement with EdFund, the state agency that guarantees federal student aid, and replace it with another entity, the Sacramento Bee reported. The department's decision could threaten Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's plan to sell the troubled agency, which has been in turmoil for years.

Monday, August 2, 2010 - 3:00am

The environmental disaster in the Gulf of Mexico has revived concerns at the University of California at Berkeley over the institution's ties to BP. The oil company gave the university $500 million for energy research in 2007 -- and many faculty members questioned the deal at the time. On Friday, a rally at Berkeley drew attention to the deal in light of recent events, with those at the rally saying it was time to revisit the university's ties to BP, the Associated Press reported. But Berkeley officials said that now isn't the time to walk away from the research. "The horrible events in the Gulf should only strengthen our commitment to find alternatives to fossil fuels," Graham Fleming, vice chancellor of research, told the AP. "Why would anyone's interest be served by stopping this research?"

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top